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Covid-19 Live Updates: Treatment That Trump Called a ‘Cure’ Was Tested With Cells Derived From Fetal Tissue

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Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

The antibody cocktail for Covid-19 that President Trump touted on Wednesday afternoon was developed with cells originally derived from fetal tissue, a practice that the president had repeatedly condemned.

In June 2019, the Trump administration suspended federal funding for most new scientific research involving fetal tissue derived from abortions.

“Promoting the dignity of human life from conception to natural death is one of the very top priorities of President Trump’s administration,” the Department of Health and Human Services said in a prepared statement.

“Intramural research that requires new acquisition of fetal tissue from elective abortions will not be conducted,” the statement added.

Mr. Trump last week received Regeneron’s cocktail of monoclonal antibodies — essentially, antibodies synthesized in living cells and administered to help the body fight off the infection.

To develop the antibodies, Regeneron relied on 293T, a human cell line once derived from fetal tissue. At least two companies racing to produce vaccines against the coronavirus, Moderna and AstraZeneca, also are using the cell line.

Remdesivir, an antiviral drug Mr. Trump received, also was tested using these cells.

“293Ts were used in testing the antibodies’ ability to neutralize the virus,” said Alexandra Bowie, a spokeswoman for Regeneron. “They weren’t used in any other way, and fetal tissue was not used in the research.”

In a video released Wednesday, Mr. Trump praised Regeneron’s treatment, calling it a “cure” for Covid-19 and promising to provide it free to any patient who needed it. The company said on Wednesday that it had applied to the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use authorization.

Scientists noted that the trials of the antibody cocktail are far from complete, and that Mr. Trump is taking a variety of drugs that may have explained why he said he felt better.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

In July, the International Society for Stem Cell Research sent a letter to the Human Fetal Tissue Research Ethics Advisory Board at the National Institutes of Health, urging the board to allow fetal tissue to be used to develop treatments for Covid-19 and for other diseases.

“Fetal tissue has unique and valuable properties that often cannot be replaced by other cell types,” the letter said.

In August, the board rejected 13 of the 14 proposals involving fetal tissue. The approved proposal relied on tissue that had already been acquired.

Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, said on Thursday that he had been avoiding the White House since midsummer because of concerns that officials there were not taking proper precautions to guard

Coronavirus live updates: Czech Republic sees record rise in cases for 2nd straight day

An internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Wednesday night shows that the number of new COVID-19 cases recorded in the United States and the nationwide usage of intensive care units are both on the rise in week-over-week comparisons.

There were 306,965 new cases confirmed during the period of Sept. 30-Oct. 6, a 4.8% increase from the previous week. There were also 4,860 coronavirus-related fatalities recorded during the period of Sept. 30-Oct. 6, a 4.6% decrease compared with the week prior, according to the memo.

Meanwhile, the national positivity rate for COVID-19 tests increased from 4.5% to 5.4% in week-to-week comparisons. Currently, 23% of hospitals across the country have more than 80% of beds full in their intensive care units. That figure was 17-18% during the summertime peak, the memo said.

The memo, which is circulated to the highest levels of the federal government and is used to determine daily priorities for the agencies working on COVID-19 response, shows that 32 U.S. states and territories are in an upward trajectory of infections, while 8 jurisdictions are at a plateau and 16 others are in a downward trend.

In Florida, 75% of ICU beds statewide are occupied. The number of new COVID-19 deaths doubled in Duval County in week-to-week comparisons, while Sumter County recently reported a single-day positivity rate for COVID-19 tests of over 20%, according to the memo.

Kentucky reported its highest single-day rise in COVID-19 cases on Oct. 3. Nearly half of current cases in northern Kentucky are patients younger than 40, and approximately 40% of them are under 30. The total number of COVID-19 hospitalizations has been increasing statewide since the end of September, the memo said.

The seven-day COVID-19 hospitalization rate continues to rise in Minnesota, reaching its highest since June 1 at 9.8 per 100,000 population, according to the memo.

In Ohio, the number of new COVID-19 cases has more than doubled in Muskingum County between the weeks ending Sept. 27 and Oct. 4. Outbreaks have been discovered at four social clubs there, according to the memo.

Wisconsin’s seven-day COVID-19 death rate has increased 139% from Sept. 27 to Oct. 4. The seven-day COVID-19 hospitalization rate also continues to climb, with Wisconsin reporting a peak of 16.4 per 100,000 population on Oct. 4. The state saw a record high of 782 COVID-19 hospitalizations on Oct. 5, more than double the amount a month earlier. As of Oct. 4, 84% of ICU beds statewide were in use. Local health departments in the counties of Fox Valley, Door and Manitowoc report seeing so many new cases that they are unable to conduct tests or

Coronavirus in Illinois updates: Here’s what happened Oct. 5 with COVID-19 in the Chicago area

Meanwhile, President Trump staged a dramatic return to the White House Monday night after leaving the military hospital where he has been receiving an unprecedented level of care for COVID-19. He immediately ignited a new controversy by declaring that despite his illness the nation should not fear the virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans — and then he entered the White House without a protective mask

Also on Monday, the CDC said that the coronavirus can spread more than 6 feet through the air, especially in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials maintained that such spread is uncommon and current social distancing guidelines still make sense.

Here’s what’s happening Monday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

5:05 p.m.: Nearly one-third of COVID patients in Chicago-area study had an altered mental state

Nearly a third of hospitalized COVID-19 patients experienced some type of altered mental function — ranging from confusion to delirium to unresponsiveness — in the largest study to date of neurological symptoms among coronavirus patients in a U.S. hospital system.

And patients with altered mental function had significantly worse medical outcomes, according to the study, published Monday in Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology. The study looked at the records of the first 509 coronavirus patients hospitalized, from March 5 to April 6, at 10 hospitals in the Northwestern Medicine health system in the Chicago area.

These patients stayed three times as long in the hospital as patients without altered mental function.

After they were discharged, only 32% of the patients with altered mental function were able to handle routine daily activities like cooking and paying bills, said Dr. Igor Koralnik, senior author of the study and chief of neuro-infectious disease and global neurology at Northwestern Medicine. In contrast, 89% of patients without altered mental function were able to manage such activities without assistance.

Patients with altered mental function — the medical term is encephalopathy — were also nearly seven times as likely to die as those who did not have that type of problem.

4:40 p.m.: St. Viator Catholic school moves to all-remote after ‘several’ positive COVID-19 cases over weekend

St. Viator High School in Arlington Heights is shifting from all-onsite learning to all-remote following an uptick in positive novel coronavirus cases in recent days, school officials said Monday.

School officials told Pioneer Press Monday that the decision was made after several positive COVID-19 test results “among those in the school” Saturday and Sunday.

Officials declined to say whether those testing positive were students or staff, or to provide additional information.

“While we had experienced only a few isolated instances since returning to school on August 24, in the past few days the number of reports exceeded what we feel allows us to provide a safe environment for our faculty, staff and students,” school President Brian Liedlich said in a statement.

4:15 p.m.: CDC now says coronavirus can spread more than 6 feet through the air in updated guidance

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Coronavirus live updates: US case count tops 7.5 million

There were 43,563 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Tuesday, driving the country’s cumulative total past 7.5 million, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

The latest daily tally is far less than the country’s record set on July 16, when there were 77,255 new cases in a 24-hour-reporting period.

An additional 705 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded Tuesday, down from a peak of 2,666 new fatalities reported on April 17.

A total of 7,501,816 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 210,909 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.

By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July. The daily tally of new cases has gradually come down since then but has hovered around 40,000 in recent weeks.

An internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News on Tuesday night shows that the number of new cases recorded in the United States as well as the number of new deaths are both down in week-over-week comparisons.

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Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, shown here at a meeting on Monday, has said that the coronavirus death toll is likely higher than the more than 1 million fatalities officially reported.

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WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, shown here at a meeting on Monday, has said that the coronavirus death toll is likely higher than the more than 1 million fatalities officially reported.

Christopher Black/AP

About 10% of the global population may have been infected by the coronavirus, according to a senior World Health Organization official.

It’s an estimate that’s far higher than the total of global confirmed cases reported by governments. At the same time, it would mean that most of the world’s population is still vulnerable to getting infected and this pandemic is far from over, the WHO’s head of emergencies Dr. Michael Ryan said Monday.

“This varies by country, it varies urban to rural, it varies by different groups,” Ryan said. “But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk.”

The WHO’s executive board is meeting in a special session Monday and Tuesday to review the WHO’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

The meeting at the WHO’s headquarters in Geneva and online comes as the world has officially tallied more than 35 million coronavirus cases and more than 1 million fatalities.

The WHO’s Director-General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said the actual number of deaths from COVID-19 is certainly higher. “Numbers can blind us to the reality that every single life lost is someone who loved and was loved by others – someone’s mother, father, sister, brother, daughter or son,” Tedros said through a mask as he opened the meeting.

“Although all countries have been affected by this virus, we must remember that this is an uneven pandemic. Ten countries account for 70% of all reported cases and deaths, and just 3 countries account for half,” he added. Those three countries are the U.S., India and Brazil.

Tedros and other officials highlighted the WHO’s actions throughout the pandemic, from issuing guidance, to developing the first diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2, to distributing personal protective equipment in low-income countries and expanding PCR testing labs globally.

Ryan said his agency — and the world — are now heading into a difficult phase of this pandemic.

“The disease continues to spread,” he said. “It is on the rise in many parts of the world.”

Cases are spiking most dramatically now in India, but many parts of Latin America are still facing rising daily infection rates. There have been resurgences in several European nations. And in the United States, the number of new infections remains stubbornly high, with the U.S. regularly recording roughly 40,000 cases per day. This is more than Ireland has tallied over the past 9 months.

Ryan said the pandemic will continue to evolve. It may flare up in some places while it wanes in others. But he added that where the pandemic becomes more intense, or

CDC updates coronavirus guidelines to include airborne transmission

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says COVID-19 can be spread through airborne transmission, according to updated guidance on the agency’s website. The update, which is now available on the agency’s “How It Spreads” page, says that people who are more than six feet away from each can still become infected from droplets that hang in the air, especially in enclosed spaces that have poor ventilation.

The revised guidance comes after the CDC updated its website to include airborne transmission last month, but then removed the information, saying it was still under review. Now, the CDC compares the respiratory spread possibility to different infections like tuberculosis, measles, and chickenpox, all viruses that spread through airborne transmission. 

“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than six feet away,” reads the new guidance. “These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising.”

So what does this mean for the average person? The CDC still asserts that close contact with someone infected with COVID-19 is the most common way to contract and spread the disease. However, the guidance on airborne transmission confirms that going maskless in poorly ventilated areas, such as restaurants and bars, where a person with COVID-19 has been could still result in infection. 

The news comes as cases in the U.S. continue to rise. Even the White House found COVID-19 hard to escape as President Trump announced he and first lady Melania Trump had both tested positive for the virus — just hours after aide Hope Hicks tested positive. Since then, more White House officials and others close to Mr. Trump and staff have also begun to test positive, including White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany. With the U.S. still leading the world in virus cases, experts hope the updated guidelines might keep residents at home and away from crowded spaces as much as possible. 

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Eyenovia to Present Clinical Study Updates at the American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting

Optometry and ophthalmology doctors to present latest analyses and updates from studies of its MAP therapeutics for mydriasis, pediatric myopia and presbyopia

Eyenovia, Inc. (NASDAQ: EYEN), a clinical stage ophthalmic biopharmaceutical company developing a pipeline of microdose array print (MAP™) therapeutics, today announced that Drs. Siddarth Rathi and April Jasper will present the latest analyses and updates from the company’s clinical studies at the American Academy of Optometry Academy 2020 At Home Con.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201005005232/en/

On Wednesday, October 7, April Jasper, OD, medical monitor for the company’s CHAPERONE study and member of the Eyenovia Scientific Advisory Board, will provide pre-recorded updates on the CHAPERONE (evaluation of low-dose atropine for the reduction of pediatric myopia progression) and the VISION (evaluation of low-dose pilocarpine for improvement in near vision) clinical trials. Dr. Jasper will also provide an update on the company’s upcoming Mydcombi (low-dose tropicamide and phenylephrine fixed combination for pupil dilation) NDA filing with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

On Thursday, October 8 at 6 p.m. EDT, Siddarth Rathi, MD, of The Eye Institute of West Florida and medical monitor for the MIST 1 and MIST 2 studies, will present additional analyses of data from the MIST 1 and MIST 2 studies of Eyenovia’s proprietary first-in-class fixed combination microdose formulation of phenylephrine and tropicamide for mydriasis (pupil dilation). Clinical results will cover Pupil Dilation Speed with MAP™ Fixed Combination (FC) Tropicamide 1% Phenylephrine 2.5% (TR-PH)-Ophthalmic Solution.

About Eyenovia

Eyenovia, Inc. (NASDAQ: EYEN) is a clinical stage ophthalmic biopharmaceutical company developing a pipeline of microdose array print (MAP™) therapeutics. Eyenovia’s pipeline is currently focused on the late-stage development of microdosed medications for presbyopia, myopia progression and mydriasis. For more Information, please visit www.eyenovia.com.

About MicroPine for Progressive Myopia

MicroPine (atropine ophthalmic solution) is being evaluated in the CHAPERONE Phase 3 clinical study for reduction in pediatric myopia progression. Progressive myopia is estimated to affect close to 5 million children in the United States who suffer from uncontrolled axial elongation of the sclera leading to increasing levels of myopia and in some cases major pathologic changes such as retinal atrophy, myopic maculopathy, retinal detachment, posterior subcapsular cataract, glaucoma and visual impairment. MicroPine has been developed for comfort, hygiene and ease-of-use in children. Microdose administration of MicroPine is anticipated to result in low systemic and ocular drug exposure. A recent therapeutic evidence assessment and review by the American Academy of Ophthalmology indicates Level 1 (highest) evidence of efficacy for the role of low dose atropine for progressive myopia (Ophthalmology 2017;124:1857-1866; Ophthalmology 2016; 123(2) 391:399).

Feasibility Dose-finding Atropine Studies: ATOM 1; ATOM 2; LAMP (Independent Collaborative Group Trials)

About MicroLine for Presbyopia

MicroLine (pilocarpine ophthalmic solution) is a pharmacologic treatment for presbyopia which will be evaluated in the VISION 1 and VISION 2 Phase 3 clinical studies. Presbyopia is the non-preventable, age-related hardening of the natural lens, which causes a gradual loss of the eye’s ability to accommodate or focus on nearby

Live Covid-19 Global Updates – The New York Times

Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

In photos and videos released by the White House, there was hardly any sign that President Trump is sick, and painting in the broadest of strokes, his doctors offered a fairly rosy portrait of his condition.

But to some outside experts who examined that portrait closely, some things seemed off.

How much, for example, should people make of the president’s fluctuating oxygen levels? And why did his doctors decide to begin treatment with a steroid drug?

Too some infectious disease experts, there were signs that Mr. Trump may be suffering a more severe case of Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, than his physicians have acknowledged.

“This is no longer aspirationally positive,” Dr. Esther Choo, a professor of emergency medicine at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, said of the doctors’ statements. “And it’s much more than just an ‘abundance of caution’ kind of thing.”

Based his doctors’ account, Mr. Trump’s symptoms appear to have rapidly progressed since he announced early Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Mr. Trump had a “high fever” on Friday, and there were two occasions when his blood oxygen levels dropped, his doctors said, including to a level that can indicate that a patient’s lungs are compromised. The symptom is seen in many patients with severe Covid-19.

The president’s medical team also said that he had been prescribed dexamethasone. The drug is a steroid used to head off an immune system overreaction that kills many Covid-19 patients. And it is generally reserved for those with severe illness.

“The dexamethasone is the most mystifying of the drugs we’re seeing him being given at this point,” said Dr. Thomas McGinn, physician in chief at Northwell Health, the largest health care provider in New York State.

The drug, he said, is normally not used unless the patient’s condition seems to be deteriorating.

“Suddenly, they’re throwing the kitchen sink at him,” Dr. McGinn said. “It raises the question: Is he sicker than we’re hearing, or are they being overly aggressive because he is the president, in a way that could be potentially harmful?”

Of course, given the patient, there may be another explanation.

Some experts raised an additional possibility: that the president is directing his own care, and demanding intense treatment despite risks he may not fully understand. The pattern even has a name: V.I.P. syndrome.

Credit…Alex Wroblewski/Reuters

As President Trump and some of his associates test positive for the coronavirus, the number of new cases reported each day across the United States has been slowly rising.

The country is at a key moment in the pandemic, and spread of the virus could worsen significantly through the autumn, experts fear, as colder weather forces people indoors. Every day, some 43,000 new cases

Westfield Mayor Updates Coronavirus Cases

WESTFIELD, NJ — Westfield Mayor Shelley Brindle said in an update on Friday night that the town had confirmed three new coronavirus cases since the last update on Tuesday, bringing the total among residents to 394 since the beginning of the pandemic.

This case total is up only 11 since Tuesday, Sept. 15, when Brindle reported a total of 383 cases.

She said that in the past week, one case was associated with a reported “cluster” among employees at a bar/restaurant in Scotch Plains.

“As announced last week, I will be using Friday updates strictly for the purposes of reporting weekly data from the Department of Health, with my more expansive updates to continue every Tuesday going forward,” Brindle noted.

Past coronavirus statistics

The total fatalities remain at 43 since the most recent death on June 3.

During the last week of August, Brindle announced that Westfield had gone a week without a new covid case. Then, there was an uptick.

Here are some other recent Westfield coronavirus and reopening updates:

HOW TO GET TESTED

  • Union County has added mobile walk up test sites in addition to the testing site located at Kean University. Testing is free for Union County residents and is by appointment only with no car required; participants must wear masks and observe social distance. Any Union County resident can make an appointment for a test, whether they have symptoms. To pick a location, date and time, and to make an appointment online, visit ucnj.org/coronavirus-update/walk-up.

  • Union County residents who need to make an appointment by phone can call 908-518-4307 for assistance. Non-profit organizations and other community groups can call the Union County Office of Emergency Management at 908-654-9881 to request a visit from the Mobile Test Unit.

SCHOOLS

  • Westfield High School closed its on-site education for two weeks in September after a number of students were reported to have the virus. Some parents complained that school sports were canceled as well.

ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT/DINING

  • See past Westfield Patch stories about Halloween and Addamsfest events.

  • Tickets for the Westfield 300 Summer Movie Series are free but require advance registration here.

  • Read about updated Quimby Street events, rules, and street closings here.

  • Indoor dining is allowed at 25 percent capacity. For a list of rules, click here.

  • To read about outdoor dining in Westfield, click here.

  • Gov. Murphy recently signed an executive order allowing gyms, health clubs, and indoor amusement facilities to reopen at 25 percent capacity effective Sept. 1. Equipment must be adjusted to allow a minimum of six feet of distance, and must be sanitized between uses. Everyone must wear masks. More details can be found here.

NATIONAL TRENDS

HOW TO GET HELP WITH HEAT, RENT, AND MORE

  • During the State of Emergency in New Jersey, no tenant is permitted to be evicted from their home or apartment for the inability to pay rent. Talk to your local mayor’s office if you are experiencing difficulties.

  • The CARES act has made money available to help with rent in

Covid-19 Live Updates: Trump Releases Video From Hospital

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President Trump released a video update on his health from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The message came after a day of confusing reports.

On Saturday, President Trump released a four-minute video from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., where he is receiving inpatient care for the coronavirus, to say that he is “starting to feel good.”

Wearing a blue jacket, cuff links and an American flag pin but no necktie, the president looked much paler than he did during his debate in Cleveland on Tuesday with former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Thanking the staff at Walter Reed, Trump said that he “wasn’t feeling so well” when he arrived at the hospital on Friday, but that he felt “much better now.”

He congratulated himself for his job performance and said, “I think I’ll be back soon.”

The video, released Saturday evening, contrasted with what Mark Meadows, the president’s chief of staff, had told reporters earlier in the day outside the hospital. “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning,” Mr. Meadows said. “And the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care.”

For a president who often serves as his own spokesman, the video’s release may have been a way to reclaim the narrative from doctors who have offered conflicting reports of the president’s health, and from statements made by his own White House staff.

According to people close to the president, he was furious about Mr. Meadows’s comments. With only a month remaining until the Nov. 3 election, there is precious little time to recast the president’s current health problems in a positive light before the nation decides whether to give him a second term in office. Mr. Trump has canceled previously scheduled public appearances, and it is unclear whether he will be able to rejoin the campaign trail.

No matter the tone of the video, the public has been left without a clear picture of the president’s health. Military doctors on Saturday morning offered a rosy picture of the president’s medical condition at a televised news conference outside Walter Reed. Afterward, Mr. Meadows told reporters that the president’s health was more worrisome, though he asked that that assessment not be attributed to him by name.

Soon, however, it became clear that Mr. Meadows was the source of the information once a video posted online captured him approaching the pool reporters outside Walter Reed after the doctors’ televised briefing and asking to speak off the record.

Mr. Meadows later tried to walk back his comments. “The president is doing very well,” he told Reuters. “He is up and about and asking for documents to review.” He called into Fox News on Saturday night, knowing the president was most likely watching, and praised his “unbelievable courage” and “unbelievable improvement.” But he also confirmed that Mr. Trump’s condition on Friday was worse than originally described. “Yesterday morning we were real concerned with