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Kamala Harris Says She Wouldn’t Trust a Vaccine Trump Recommended

Citing the Trump administration’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, Kamala Harris said that she’d happily take a vaccine that doctors and scientists recommend — but absolutely not one touted by Donald Trump.

Asked at Wednesday’s vice-presidential debate whether she would take a vaccine approved by the Trump administration before or after the election, Harris said she’d be the “first in line” to take the vaccine if health experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci recommended it.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us that we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it, absolutely. But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it, I’m not taking it,” Harris said.

Also Read: New England Journal of Medicine Blasts Trump Administration’s ‘Dangerously Incompetent’ Pandemic Response

Harris’ one-liner didn’t happen in a vacuum of course. They come after the Trump administration has in recent weeks tried to speed up the process of vaccine production to come out before the election. For instance this week when it tried to overrule FDA guidelines for the safe development of a vaccine in a transparent attempt to have a vaccine before the election. However, the FDA ultimately prevailed and the safer guidelines will prevent a vaccine from being rushed out.

Vice President Mike Pence responded that Harris should “stop playing politics with people’s lives” and accused Harris of “undermining” a vaccine.

Kamala Harris on a coronavirus vaccine: “If the doctors tell us that we should take it, I’ll be the first in line … but if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it, I’m not taking it.”#VPDebate pic.twitter.com/XkXoj4tM1C

— The Recount (@therecount) October 8, 2020

Read original story Kamala Harris Says She Wouldn’t Trust a Vaccine Trump Recommended At TheWrap

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Trump put on steroid recommended for severe Covid-19 cases, even as doctors share upbeat outlook

  • President Trump’s doctors said that they had begun treating him with a steroid that has shown promise for critically ill patients but may cause harm to those with less severe cases of Covid-19. 
  • The revelation, which came as part of an upbeat briefing on the president’s condition, raised further questions about Trump’s health as the 74-year-old wrestles with the virus.
  • White House physician Sean Conley said the president’s medical team had begun treating the president with dexamethasone.



a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building: Acting White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows holds the door for Sean Conley(front C), Physician to US President Donald Trump, and other members of the President's medical team as they arrive to give an update on the President's health at Walter Reed Medical Center during treatment for a COVID-19 infection October 4, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.


© Provided by CNBC
Acting White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows holds the door for Sean Conley(front C), Physician to US President Donald Trump, and other members of the President’s medical team as they arrive to give an update on the President’s health at Walter Reed Medical Center during treatment for a COVID-19 infection October 4, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.

President Donald Trump’s doctors said Sunday that they had begun treating him with dexamethasone, a steroid that has shown promise for critically ill patients but may cause harm to those with less severe cases of Covid-19. 

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The revelation, which came as part of an upbeat briefing on the president’s condition, raised further questions about Trump’s health as the 74-year-old wrestles with the virus that has killed more than 200,000 Americans.

Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, an infectious diseases physician at the Boston University School of Medicine, said the steroid treatment suggests that Trump has a level of inflammation that warrants the use of steroids despite the fact that the drug also suppresses the immune system. 

“That they made a conscious decision that the benefit of giving steroids outweighs the risk implies a higher degree of severity than what we knew on Friday and Saturday,” Bhadelia said in an email.

Another expert, Dr. Vin Gupta, said the doctors’ disclosures may indicate that Trump could be suffering from pneumonia.

“The treatment the doctors report they administered suggest the president has COVID pneumonia of at least mild severity,” said Gupta, a member of the faculty at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

The briefing took place outside the Walter Reed military hospital in Bethesda, Md., where the president has been treated since Friday. 

White House physician Sean Conley said the president’s medical team had begun treating the president with dexamethasone. The course of treatment came in response to two incidents in which Trump’s blood oxygen levels dipped below normal levels in recent days. 

Conley also said that Trump could be discharged as soon as Monday and said his health was improving.

Bhadelia said she generally would not discharge someone who was just put on steroids.

The Trump medical team’s announcement complicated assessments of how dire the president’s case is, particularly in light of the caginess that has surrounded details about the president’s health.

Video: Medical experts unsure why Trump was given experimental treatment (MSNBC)

Medical experts unsure why Trump was given experimental treatment

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According to the World Health Organization, dexamethasone has been shown to reduce 28-day

Donald Trump’s Dexamethasone Treatment Is Recommended Only for Patients on Oxygen, Ventilators

Dexamethasone, the steroid physicians administered to President Donald Trump as part of his COVID-19 treatment this weekend, is only recommended for coronavirus patients who are mechanically ventilated or require supplemental oxygen, according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines.



text: A box of dexamethasone tablets is pictured at a pharmacy in Cardiff, United Kingdom, on June 16 in this photo illustration. On Sunday, White House physician Sean Conley said President Donald Trump received the steroid drug as part of his COVID-19 treatment this weekend.


© Matthew Horwood/Getty
A box of dexamethasone tablets is pictured at a pharmacy in Cardiff, United Kingdom, on June 16 in this photo illustration. On Sunday, White House physician Sean Conley said President Donald Trump received the steroid drug as part of his COVID-19 treatment this weekend.

The agency’s recommendations about dexamethasone appear alongside a wider set of guidelines regarding the effectiveness of corticosteroids in treating COVID-19 patients. Its guidance relies on findings included in a preliminary report from a large clinical trial that evaluated the effects of dexamethasone in more than 2,100 individuals hospitalized with COVID-19.

The report indicated dexamethasone lowered mortality rates in hospitalized patients who required supplemental oxygen upon admission, and concluded that administering the drug to those patients, and those who require ventilation, was ultimately beneficial. It recommended against using the treatment for COVID-19 patients who do not require supplemental oxygen.

News of Trump’s latest treatment, which White House physician Sean Conley confirmed on Sunday, fueled public suspicions about the president’s condition and whether his administration is being honest about it. Trump first announced he and the first lady tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday morning. While an initial statement from Conley suggested both Trumps would carry out their quarantine and recovery at the White House, the president was later admitted to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, to receive more consistent care.

World Reacts To Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Testing Positive For Coronavirus

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Several updates from Conley on Friday and Saturday emphasized Trump was doing well, and the president said the same himself in a video message shared to Twitter Saturday afternoon. However, questions were raised when Conley confirmed that the president’s medical team chose to initiate treatment using antiviral drug Remdesivir upon Trump’s hospital admission. Remdesivir is not formally authorized for widespread use as a COVID-19 treatment by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), although it was approved for emergency use in hospitalized patients.

Despite the overwhelmingly positive updates from administration officials regarding Trump’s health, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told Fox News his colleagues were “real concerned” about the president’s condition on Friday during an interview the following night. “He had a fever, and his blood oxygen level dropped rapidly,” Meadows shared Saturday evening, adding that Trump showed signs of “unbelievable improvement” since then. He noted the next 48 hours would be critical in terms of the president’s care.

Conley provided more details about Trump’s health status and medical treatment during a news briefing on Sunday. The physician said Walter Reed medical staff administered supplemental oxygen to the president after he was admitted. He also acknowledged that in a Saturday press conference he omitted information about Trump taking oxygen Friday at the

Weekly Testing for NHS Staff Recommended



These are the UK coronavirus stories you need to know about today.

UK COVID-19 Update: Weekly Testing for NHS Staff Recommended

The Commons Health and Social Care Committee’s latest report into the handling of COVID-19 recommends routine testing of NHS staff to help keep services running.

The report also warns of tens of thousands of avoidable deaths within a year because of disruption to non-COVID services, such as cancer care.

In a news release the MPs said “a compelling case” has been made for staff testing “and they are yet to understand why it cannot be introduced”.

In a statement, Committee Chair Jeremy Hunt expressed pride in the “heroic contribution” of frontline NHS staff but the pandemic “massively impacted normal NHS services, something that could have been mitigated with earlier infection control measures in hospitals and clearer communication to patients whose care was disrupted.

“Weekly testing of NHS staff has been repeatedly promised in hotspot areas – but is still not being delivered. Failure to do so creates a real risk that the NHS will be forced to retreat into being a largely COVID-only service during a second spike.”

BMA Council Chair Dr Chaand Nagpaul said the report showed the need for “a credible plan to dig us out of the trenches”.

Latest Local Lockdowns

Liverpool, Warrington, Hartlepool, and Middlesbrough are the latest areas in England to come under local lockdown restrictions.

Liverpool’s cases are 268 per 100,000 population.

Residents are being urged not to mix with people from different households indoors and to avoid non-essential travel.

Test and Trace

The latest data for England’s Test and Trace system for 17 to 23 September show a 61% increase in positive tests from the previous week.

Turnaround times have improved with 70.6% of in-person swab tests received the next day compared with 52.9% the previous week.

Of those transferred to contact tracing, 71.3% were reached. Overall, 71.6% of identified contacts were reached.

In today’s daily data another 6914 UK positve tests were reported and 59 deaths.

There are 2276 COVID-19 patients in hospital and 332 ventilator beds are in use.

Meanwhile, The Guardian reported that nurses and other health professionals will no longer play a part in England’s NHS 111 COVID-19 call handling.

The decision followed an audit in July after concerns were raised about the quality of some calls, and a number of “clinical incidents” that “may have resulted in harm”.

Is Case Growth Slowing?

Imperial and Ipsos MORI’s REACT study’s latest data suggest that while cases remain high in England, recent measures may be starting to slow the growth in cases.

Between 18 and 26 September 84,610 swab tests were analysed. 

  • 363 people tested positive

  • 55 in every 10,000 people had the virus

  • 1 in every 100 18-24 year olds had the virus

  • 411,000 people were infected on any single day

  • R was estimated at 1.1

Imperial’s Professor Paul Elliott commented: “While our latest findings show some early evidence that the growth of new cases may have slowed, suggesting