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Fitness tech company JAXJOX raises $10M as it gets ready to ship AI-enabled workout system



The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)


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The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)

JAXJOX, the Redmond, Wash.-based fitness technology company, has raised $10 million in a new funding round to help pay for the research and development of its signature InteractiveStudio workout equipment.

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The Series A round included investors Dowgate Capital Ltd. and entrepreneur Nigel Wray, and brings total funding to $17 million for the 3-year-old company.

JAXJOX is getting set to release its InteractiveStudio smart gym, a home fitness system that includes digitally adjustable weights, AI-enabled connected tech built into the equipment, and live and on-demand classes.

With connected tech built into individual pieces of free-weight equipment, such as a smart kettlebell, users don’t have to stand a certain distance from a screen to have form and motion tracked.

“By monitoring performance metrics and using AI, we can give users a more holistic view of their health and provide recommendations on improving their wellbeing,” founder and CEO Stephen Owusu said in a news release. “We believe that, for users, tracking power generated while lifting will become as important as tracking your heart rate while running.”

The InteractiveStudio is available for pre-order on the JAXJOX website and retails for $2,199 with a $39 monthly subscription. The system will also sell as part of an exclusive retail partnership this fall with Best Buy.

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Ready To Upgrade Your Workouts? Our Fitness Guide Is On Sale for Prime Day

If you clicked on this story, there’s a good chance you care about your fitness. Instead of having a professional trainer, fancy gym membership, and hours to commit to exercising, you have to a full-time job and bills to pay. And, as you get older, you might not be able to do some of those grueling workouts from your twenties.



a man in a blue shirt: On October 13, Amazon shoppers can save big on Men's Health "Muscle After 40" fitness guide as a limited time lightning sale. Learn more about this deal here.


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On October 13, Amazon shoppers can save big on Men’s Health “Muscle After 40” fitness guide as a limited time lightning sale. Learn more about this deal here.

You want to get in shape, but where do you start?



text: Muscle After 40: Build Your Best Body Ever in Your 40s and Beyond


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Muscle After 40: Build Your Best Body Ever in Your 40s and Beyond

$24.95

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We know how hard it is to find a workout you like—and to stick with it—so we created a fitness guide called “Muscle After 40” to help. The best part: You can snag the entire guide for just $17.56 on Tuesday October 13, starting at 7 a.m. EST as part of this Amazon lightning deal

Gallery: 25 Workouts You Can Do Right Before Bed (Mom.com)

Targeted for men over 40 years-old, our guide features a streamlined, 12-week plan that proves it’s possible to get in great shape at any age.

These workouts are designed to build muscle and combat sarcopenia, a loss of muscle tissue that usually occurs after 40 years-old. Our multi-joint exercises ensure you hit every muscle, while our occasional isolation movements will help you get results without pulling a muscle. Most of our workouts consist of shorter, more frequent bursts, you can always take your workout to the next level with some extra repetitions.

Not only will you see results by the end of the 12-week program, but you’ll also be one step close to getting the body of your dreams.

The only catch is that, if you’re interested you have to shop now. In just a few hours the guide is going back up to full price (at 1:20pm EST to be exact). Whether you want to up your workout routine or find an exercise plan that actually works, our book makes getting in shape easy and affordable.

Try 200+ at home workout videos from Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Prevention, and more on All Out Studio free for 14 days!

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Trump says he’s ready to ‘kiss everyone’

President Trump in his return to the campaign trail in Florida on Monday evening boasted he has recovered from COVID-19 and is impervious to the disease that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

The president, who tested positive on Oct. 1, also indicated he is unconcerned about being contagious and told the audience gathered at Orlando Sanford International Airport that he would be happy to engage in some close contact. 

“One thing with me, the nice part, I went through it, now they say I’m immune. … I feel so powerful,” Trump said. “I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys, and the beautiful women, and the — everybody. I’ll just give you a big fat kiss.”

Trump spoke for about an hour. While his remarks were short by the standards of his past rallies, which are often about 80 minutes long, it was far longer than any of the brief videos he released while recovering from the virus or his first live speech, which took place at the White House on Saturday and lasted less than 2 minutes. 

The president’s return to the campaign trail came shortly after the White House medical team announced that he tested negative “on consecutive days.” Trump’s return to public events came exactly 10 days after the White House said his symptoms first appeared, which is the period of isolation recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.

Trump, who was treated with steroids and experimental drugs, became ill after his campaign and the White House hosted a series of events that ignored masks and social distancing measures designed to stop the spread of the virus. Over a dozen people linked to those gatherings also tested positive, including senior members of the president’s campaign team and White House staff.

The White House has declined to reveal precisely how many staffers have fallen ill. Trump’s team has also repeatedly refused to say when he last tested negative prior to his diagnosis, raising the possibility that the testing regimen supposedly in place at the White House was not followed and also making it impossible to say whether the president traveled to events while contagious. 

Even after the cluster of cases at the White House, Trump’s Florida rally still didn’t include standard measures designed to minimize risks of coronavirus spread. Guests were packed together and many did not wear masks. 

On stage, Trump, as he has for months, criticized lockdowns and quarantine measures as detrimental to the economy. He encouraged people to ignore them if they choose.

“The cure cannot be worse than the problem itself,” Trump said of the lockdowns.“If you want to stay, stay. Relax. Stay. But, if you want to get out there, get out.”

Donald Trump
President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)

The president also suggested keeping distance from others was never an option for him.   

“I don’t have to be locked up in my basement and I wouldn’t allow that to happen

Trump, downplaying risk, says he’s ready to ‘kiss everyone’ at his first campaign trail rally since COVID-19 diagnosis

President Trump in his return to the campaign trail in Florida on Monday evening boasted he has recovered from COVID-19 and is impervious to the disease that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

The president, who tested positive on Oct. 1, also indicated he is unconcerned about being contagious and told the audience gathered at Orlando Sanford International Airport that he would be happy to engage in some close contact. 

“One thing with me, the nice part, I went through it, now they say I’m immune. … I feel so powerful,” Trump said. “I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys, and the beautiful women, and the — everybody. I’ll just give you a big fat kiss.”

Trump spoke for about an hour. While his remarks were short by the standards of his past rallies, which are often about 80 minutes long, it was far longer than any of the brief videos he released while recovering from the virus or his first live speech, which took place at the White House on Saturday and lasted less than 2 minutes. 

The president’s return to the campaign trail came shortly after the White House medical team announced that he tested negative “on consecutive days.” Trump’s return to public events came exactly 10 days after the White House said his symptoms first appeared, which is the period of isolation recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.

Trump, who was treated with steroids and experimental drugs, became ill after his campaign and the White House hosted a series of events that ignored masks and social distancing measures designed to stop the spread of the virus. Over a dozen people linked to those gatherings also tested positive, including senior members of the president’s campaign team and White House staff.

The White House has declined to reveal precisely how many staffers have fallen ill. Trump’s team has also repeatedly refused to say when he last tested negative prior to his diagnosis, raising the possibility that the testing regimen supposedly in place at the White House was not followed and also making it impossible to say whether the president traveled to events while contagious. 

Even after the cluster of cases at the White House, Trump’s Florida rally still didn’t include standard measures designed to minimize risks of coronavirus spread. Guests were packed together and many did not wear masks. 

On stage, Trump, as he has for months, criticized lockdowns and quarantine measures as detrimental to the economy. He encouraged people to ignore them if they choose.

“The cure cannot be worse than the problem itself,” Trump said of the lockdowns.“If you want to stay, stay. Relax. Stay. But, if you want to get out there, get out.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)


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President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)

The president also suggested keeping distance from others was never an option for him.   

Video: President Trump: White House doctors said I can’t spread the virus anymore

Trump claims he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was ready to return to the campaign trail despite unanswered questions about his health on the eve of a Florida rally meant to kick off the stretch run before Election Day.

His impending return comes after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it. The president insisted he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and added to the unknowns about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures.” “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he was no longer considered a transmission risk. The memo did not declare Trump had tested negative for the virus.


But sensitive lab tests — like the PCR test cited in the doctor’s statements — detect virus in swab samples taken from the nose and throat. Some medical experts had been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

His return to full-fledged rallies will be in Florida on Monday, a comeback that comes with the president facing stubborn deficits in the polls. The Trump campaign and White House has not indicated that any additional safety measures will be taken to prevent the transmission of the virus among those traveling on Air Force One, at the event site or at rallies scheduled for Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week.

Campaign officials have signaled that Trump will be traveling nearly every day the rest of the campaign, and sometimes making more than one stop, an aggressive schedule for a 74-year-old who was hospitalized just days ago.

On Sunday, Trump asserted in a tweet that he had “total and complete sign off from White House Doctors” to fully return to the campaign trail, insisting he can no longer spread the disease to others and was impervious to getting sick again.

That’s far from certain, and Twitter later flagged his tweet with a fact-check warning.

While there’s evidence that reinfection in unlikely for at least three months even for those with a mild case of COVID-19, very few diseases leave people completely immune for life. Antibodies are only one piece of the body’s defenses, and they naturally wane over time.

“Certainly it’s presumptuous to say it’s a lifetime,” said Dr. Albert Ko, an infectious disease specialist and department chairman at the Yale School of Public Health.

As to whether Trump could still be

Trump Insists He’s Free of Virus, Ready for Campaign Trail | Political News

By JONATHAN LEMIRE, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was healthy enough to return to the campaign trail, a day after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it.

Trump, who was poised Monday to host his first rally after his COVID-19 diagnosis, declared he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and comes amid a series of outstanding questions about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News. “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he was no longer considered a transmission risk. The memo did not declare Trump had tested negative for the virus.

But sensitive lab tests — like the PCR test cited in the doctor’s statements — detect virus in swab samples taken from the nose and throat. Some medical experts had been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

The memo followed Trump’s first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus at a military hospital. Hundreds of people gathered Saturday afternoon on the South Lawn for a Trump address on his support for law enforcement from a White House balcony.

Trump took off a mask moments after he emerged on the balcony to address the crowd on the lawn below, his first step back onto the public stage with just more than three weeks to go until Election Day. He flouted, once more, the safety recommendations of his own government days after acknowledging that he was on the brink of “bad things” from the virus and claiming that his bout with the illness brought him a better understanding of it.

His return was a brief one. With bandages visible on his hands, likely from an intravenous injection, Trump spoke for 18 minutes, far less than his normal hour-plus rallies. He appeared healthy, if perhaps a little hoarse, as he delivered what was, for all intents and purposes, a short version of his campaign speech despite the executive mansion setting.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, adding that he was thankful for their good wishes and prayers as he recovered. He then declared that the pandemic, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans, was “disappearing” even though he is still recovering from the virus.

In either an act of defiance or simply tempting fate, officials organized the event just steps from the

Trump insists he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail

President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was healthy enough to return to the campaign trail, a day after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it.

Trump, who was poised Monday to host his first rally after his COVID-19 diagnosis, declared he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and comes amid a series of outstanding questions about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News. “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”


In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he was no longer considered a transmission risk. The memo did not declare Trump had tested negative for the virus.

But sensitive lab tests — like the PCR test cited in the doctor’s statements — detect virus in swab samples taken from the nose and throat. Some medical experts had been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

The memo followed Trump’s first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus at a military hospital. Hundreds of people gathered Saturday afternoon on the South Lawn for a Trump address on his support for law enforcement from a White House balcony.

Trump took off a mask moments after he emerged on the balcony to address the crowd on the lawn below, his first step back onto the public stage with just more than three weeks to go until Election Day. He flouted, once more, the safety recommendations of his own government days after acknowledging that he was on the brink of “bad things” from the virus and claiming that his bout with the illness brought him a better understanding of it.

His return was a brief one. With bandages visible on his hands, likely from an intravenous injection, Trump spoke for 18 minutes, far less than his normal hour-plus rallies. He appeared healthy, if perhaps a little hoarse, as he delivered what was, for all intents and purposes, a short version of his campaign speech despite the executive mansion setting.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, adding that he was thankful for their good wishes and prayers as he recovered. He then declared that the pandemic, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans, was “disappearing” even though he is still recovering from the virus.

In either an act of defiance or simply tempting fate, officials organized the event just steps from the Rose Garden, where exactly two weeks ago the

Trump Tells Sean Hannity He’s Ready for In-Person Events After Hospitalization (but Keeps Coughing)

Ben Gabbe/Getty; Win McNamee/Getty Sean Hannity (left) and President Donald Trump

Sounding more hoarse than usual and occasionally interrupting himself to cough and clear his throat, President Donald Trump called into Sean Hannity’s Fox News show on Thursday night to give an update on his diagnosis with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and sound off — in Trump fashion — on other topics.

“I think I’m going to try doing a rally on Saturday night, if we have enough time to put it together,” said Trump, less than a day before aides said that he would actually speak with supporters at the White House instead.

Trump, 74, then quickly changed the subject when the Fox News host asked if he had been tested for COVID-19 since his diagnosis a week ago.

“Well what we’re doing is, probably, the test will be tomorrow,” the president said. “The actual test, because there’s no reason to test all the time. But they found very little infection, or virus — if any … I didn’t go into it greatly with the doctors.”

As viewers noted, Trump audibly cleared his throat and coughed at least twice during the interview, sometimes appearing quite hoarse.

The moments were notable in the context of his recovery: White House doctors have said Trump is doing well enough to return from the hospital to finish his treatment, though the medical team previously gave a conflicting account of his health and admitted to projecting optimism.

Since returning home from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Trump has said his treatment course made him improve drastically, and fast. His doctors said he received steroids, an antiviral and experimental antibodies but noted Monday he may be “entirely out of the woods.”

RELATED: Trump Calls Coronavirus Diagnosis ‘a Blessing from God’ as Doctors Say His Health Is ‘Stable’

Calling into Hannity’s show on Thursday, when he wasn’t speaking about COVID-19 — a highly contagious virus that Trump has publicly downplayed since it began sweeping across the country early this year — the conversation veered widely.

At one point, Trump falsely claimed Democrats in California want to “ration water … to take care of certain little tiny fish.”

During another segment, the president attacked Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, whom authorities said was the intended victim of a foiled kidnapping plot. And he called Sen. Kamala Harris a “monster.”

The president also spoke about the fate of the remaining debates between him and Democratic nominee Joe Biden, which have been mired in controversy since the debate commission announced that the next event, on Oct. 15, would be held virtually out of health concerns.

“I’m not gonna do a virtual debate — sit behind a computer screen,” Trump told Hannity. “And that gives him the answers, because they’ll be handing him the answers.”

The president’s medical team has said his health is in stable condition, though it’s unclear if Trump might still be contagious — making any in-person debates or events particularly precarious (for both Trump, who

Is Trump ready to hit the campaign trail? Here’s what doctors say

Just days after receiving oxygen therapy for Covid-19, US President Donald Trump is busy giving long TV interviews and says he’s eager to return to the campaign trail. 

But is he risking his recovery by taking on too much too soon, and could he still infect others? 

– Each case is unique – 

According to Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease and critical care doctor as well as scholar at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, there is a wide variation between patients in terms of the speed of their recovery.

“Some people are able to resume their activities of daily living pretty quickly. There are other people to take some weeks before they’re back to their baseline,” he said.

In general, “for someone in their 70s who was hospitalized with Covid, I would say it takes a couple of weeks to get back to their baseline.

“But because he’s the president, he has a lot of people assisting him with his activities of daily living. He probably doesn’t carry his groceries in, he doesn’t drive a car.” 

Trump was hospitalized for three nights on October 2 and has been in the care of the White House medical unit — which can provide hospital-level care — since October 5, four days ago.

Doctor Mangala Narasimhan, senior vice president of critical care at Northwell Health, New York, said patients of Trump’s age who had needed oxygen for Covid pneumonia often continue to experience “severe fatigue and myalgia, which are muscle pains and aches,” for some time after.

Both doctors stressed it is very difficult to know precisely where Trump is in his recovery, since his medical team and others around him have provided opaque and at times conflicting updates.

– Danger of coming back too soon – 

A well-known danger from over-exertion following disease is that it wears down the immune system.

“He needs his immune system to fight the virus — that’s why you’re always told to stick to rest and drink fluids, because your immune system needs to be at its optimum,” said Narasimhan.

She added this was particularly crucial for older patients who are more susceptible to experiencing a second viral replication phase where symptoms such as fevers and chills return.

Trump’s full medical history and underlying conditions aren’t fully known, but one thing we are aware of is that he has mild heart disease that could be aggravated, said Adalja.

Narasimhan added that Trump’s medical team hasn’t released key lab values, from which doctors could infer more information. 

These include “inflammatory markers” that would indicate how he was recovering from the inflammatory phase of the disease, and certain blood values that would reveal how likely he is to develop clots as a result of the virus.

“People tend to form clots, and depending on what his blood levels are of certain things, you would want to make sure that at 30 days afterwards that he is on medicine that would prevent clots,” she said.

“There’s all kinds

Gilead Drug Shows Promising Results In Treating COVID, Ready For Distribution Says CEO

KEY POINTS

  • Gilead’s coronavirus treatment redemsivir was found to reduce recovery time in patients by several days
  • Redemsivir and other drug treatments could serve as stopgap measures until a proper vaccine is ready and approved
  • The Trump administration and Congress re-entered negotiations about a stimulus package to help a U.S. economy hit hard by the pandemic

Final results from Gilead Sciences’ latest remdesivir trial showed the antiviral drug was effective in treating coronavirus patients and cutting recovery time by at least a week.

Gilead’s CEO said, given the positive results, the company was ready for mass production and distribution of the drug.

As of Friday, Johns Hopkins said the U.S. has over 7.6 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and 212,805 reported deaths from it. The latest trial was conducted for nearly a month and involved over 1,062 patients hospitalized for coronavirus. Half of the patients were given remdesivir while the other half were given placebo as part of the randomized, double-blind trial. Trial sites were located in the U.S., United Kingdom, Denmark, Mexico, Japan, Germany, Greece, Korea, Spain, and Singapore.

Average recovery time for people given remdesivir was found to be shortened by five days. While overall data showed the drug was not significant in reducing mortality, it appeared effective in lowering the mortality rate among patients on oxygen.

“Our data show that remdesivir was superior to placebo in shortening the time to recovery in adults who were hospitalized with COVID-19 and had evidence of lower respiratory tract infection,” the final report in the New England Journal of Medicine said.

Gilead CEO Daniel O’Day said the company was pleased with the results and ready for distribution, if and when the drug is approved.

“These results are meaningful,” O’Day told CNBC. “They’ll definitely help patients around the world who have the misfortune of entering the hospital to get better, and I’m really pleased to say that we have ample supply.”

Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said while remdesivir, alone, is likely not enough to treat coronavirus, this data is a good sign in battling the pandemic.

“I think combined with the antibody drugs, which should be coming onto the market soon based on the data that we’ve seen, this is a pretty effective treatment regime in advance of a vaccine,” Gottlieb told CNBC.

While a drug like remdesivir, or the antibody treatment developed by Eli Lilly, serve as a stopgap means of addressing coronavirus, a vaccine will still be needed to serve as a long-term answer. The hope is that a vaccine will be approved and ready for distribution by the end of December, with timetables having life get back to some degree of normalcy by summer 2021.

Some of the vaccines furthest along include:

  • Moderna and the National Institute of Health’s mRNA vaccine, currently in Phase 3 trials
  • China’s CanSino Biologics and Russia’s Gamaleya Research Institute have vaccines in limited approval, though experts warned these were likely rushed and could still be harmful
  • AstraZeneca and the