Showing: 1 - 10 of 18 RESULTS

Former Trump doctor Ronny Jackson questions Biden’s mental fitness for office

Ronny Jackson, the former White House physician-turned-GOP congressional candidate, suggested on Tuesday that Democratic nominee Joe Biden is mentally unfit for office, citing what he called cognitive decline.



a man wearing a suit and tie looking at the camera: Former Trump doctor Ronny Jackson questions Biden's mental fitness for office


© Getty
Former Trump doctor Ronny Jackson questions Biden’s mental fitness for office

The remarks from Jackson, who has not evaluated Biden, came during a phone call organized by President Trump’s campaign and are part of a sustained effort by Trump’s allies to highlight Biden’s gaffes on the campaign trail, arguing they make him mentally incapable of serving as commander in chief.

Jackson said Tuesday that he was speaking as a “concerned citizen” and not as a Republican congressional candidate.

“As a citizen of this country, I watch Joe Biden on the campaign trail and I am concerned that he does not – am convinced that he does not have the mental capacity, the cognitive ability to serve as our commander in chief and head of state,” Jackson told reporters on the call.

“I really think that he needs some type of cognitive testing before he takes over the reigns as our commander in chief, if that is in the cards,” Jackson added.

Jackson later acknowledged, in response to a question from a reporter, that he has never treated or evaluated Biden and said he was not making a medical assessment of Biden’s mental health.

“I am not making a medical assessment. I actually don’t even practice medicine at this point. I am not doing that,” Jackson said. “I am not trying to remotely diagnose him with anything. I have not accused him of having Alzheimer’s or anything of that nature. I have not made that statement.”

Jackson mentioned a handful of instances from Monday when Biden, who was campaigning in Ohio, could not remember the name of Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and mistakenly said he was running for the Senate, not the White House.

In a response to Jackson’s comment, Biden spokesman Andrew Bates said in a statement, “I refer you to the first debate.”

Trump and his campaign have been targeting Biden’s mental fitness for months, during which time Biden has built a sizable lead in national polling and an advantage in key battleground states. Trump, meanwhile, has little time to turn his campaign around as Republicans grow concerned about potentially losing the White House and Senate.

Trump’s performance in the first debate against Biden was widely panned by Republicans as a missed opportunity that put scrutiny back on the president instead of Biden. Doug Heye, a former communications director for the Republican National Committee, said the attack on Biden’s gaffes would have been more effective if Trump had executed it during the debate.

“If this is going to be a central part of your theme for your campaign, then you have to attack this tactically. There is no better opportunity for that than the first debate,” Heye told The Hill. “Doing that on a conference call is not going to move the needle.”

On Monday evening, Trump, who

COVID-19 Antibodies Raise Unanswered Clinical Questions

While monoclonal antibody treatment may hold promise for COVID-19, its clinical benefit has yet to be proven, said experts from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

In a media briefing, IDSA experts discussed that while manufacturers of monoclonal antibody treatment, Regeneron and Eli Lilly, both applied for emergency use authorization (EUA) from the FDA to treat COVID-19, the data on both so far have yet to demonstrate any impact on patient care.

Reviewing the data, Adarsh Bhimraj, MD, co-chair of the IDSA COVID-19 Treatment and Management Guidelines Expert panel, noted how the endpoints of both trials examined decreases in viral load for patients. He characterized these as surrogate endpoints, or “disease-oriented endpoints,” which are only meaningful if they translate into patient-oriented outcomes, such as preventing death or disability.

“Curing the virus is not the same thing as curing the patient and making them better,” he said.

Bhimraj even compared these antibody therapies to the saga of hydroxychloroquine, which was also shown to have “a very fast reduction in viral load” in early studies, “but randomized controlled trials did not translate into patients getting better or not dying.”

Helen Boucher, MD, member of the IDSA Board of Directors, said she wanted to support the FDA in their efforts to make evidence-based decisions about EUAs, saying they wanted to keep “everyone assured when we make recommendations, they’re believable and everyone can feel good about them.”

Bhimraj pointed to the situation with convalescent plasma, which received an EUA outside the context of a randomized clinical trial.

“We don’t have clinical trial data and it’s been used in thousands and thousands of people,” he said. “An EUA is important, but … what are the consequences … of an EUA and what are the collateral effects, especially when other therapies exist?”

He emphasized how important it was to “let science and let objectivity … determine the decision-making rather than any kind of political pressure.”

Boucher noted that the difference between having enough data for an EUA application was different than having enough data for a decision to be made. She suggested if the FDA wanted more data, it could convene an advisory committee to help in the decision-making process, “but it’s not a requirement, as far as I know.”

She added that even if an EUA is issued, that’s only half the battle, given how much manufacturers would need to scale up to meet demand.

“Any kind of authorization or approval doesn’t necessarily mean the drug is available to anyone who needs it,” Boucher said.

Using the example of 50,000 people who may be infected with COVID-19 on any particular day, even 20% of those patients ending up in the hospital would require more product than the companies are prepared to produce right now. Boucher said it would take “months” to manufacture enough to treat everyone in this country who needs it.

Cost is potentially another issue, with the other existing COVID-19 treatments potentially being much less expensive. Boucher said the steroid, dexamethasone, costs

Hospitalizations up; 11 state records; WHO questions lockdowns

CLOSE

Since the coronavirus pandemic started, the United States has recorded more than 7.6 million cases of COVID-19 and 213,000 deaths.

USA TODAY

Coronavirus hospitalizations were continuing a dangerous trend in the United States while Brazil and India each reached ominous milestones as the global pandemic showed little sign of retreating Sunday.

Hospitalizations, which peaked at nearly 60,000 across the nation in July, had fallen by more than half last month. But since dipping below 29,000 on Sept. 20, the number of people being treated in hospitals each day has crept higher, to almost 35,000.

And a USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Saturday shows 11 states set records for new cases for a seven-day period – Alaska, Colorado, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota and Utah. The U.S. has recorded its fourth consecutive day of more than 50,000 new COVID-19 cases, a streak not seen in two months.

The U.S. has now reported more than 7.7 million cases and almost 215,000 deaths since the first U.S. case was confirmed Jan. 21. Record numbers of deaths over a seven-day period were reported in Kansas and North Dakota.

US reports more than 50K cases for third straight day: 9 states set record

The world is not faring much better. 

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to unveil tougher restrictions Monday, including a three-tier system based on severity of cases in each region of England. Graham Medley, professor of infectious disease modelling at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the director of the Center for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, warned that “thousands will die” unless Britain can alter the trajectory of the disease.

“We are clearly in a difficult position,” Medley tweeted. “The level and rise of infections, admissions and deaths puts us in a similar position to early March. (But) we know the harms that ‘lockdown’ will bring. Very, very hard choices.”

Trump’s doctor: President no longer a risk for transmitting COVID-19

Dr. David Nabarro, the World Health Organization’s special envoy on COVID-19, urged world leaders this week to stop “using lockdowns as your primary control method” for blunting a virus surge.

“We in the World Health Organization do not advocate lockdowns as the primary means of control of this virus,” Nabarro told “The Spectator.” Nabarro said lockdowns can only be justified “to buy you time to reorganize, regroup, rebalance your resources, protect your health workers who are exhausted. But by and large, we’d rather not do it.”

In Brazil, the death toll surpassed 150,000 on Saturday night, second only to the U.S., according to the data amassed by Johns Hopkins University. President Jair Bolsonaro has followed President Donald Trump’s lead in downplaying the virus, ignoring social distancing guidelines and encouraging boisterous political demonstrations.

And like Trump, Bolsonaro has contracted the infection, surviving a bout with COVID-19 in July.

In India, health officials reported that total infections have surpassed 7 million. That total is second only to

Trump dodges tough questions on his health during rambling interview on Tucker Carlson’s show

Donald Trump; Tucker Carlson
Donald Trump; Tucker Carlson

Donald Trump and Tucker Carlson Photo illustration by Salon/Getty Images

Donald Trump’s appearance on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News show, less than a week since the president returned from being hospitalized for COVID-19, revealed very little about Trump’s health or infectiousness. Yet unintentionally,  the president seems to have dropped some clues about the seriousness of his condition during the rambling, tangent-ridden interview.

The interview on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” was conducted by Dr. Marc Siegel, a Fox News contributor who has defended Trump’s poor handling of the American coronavirus outbreak, compared the pandemic to the flu and in 2016 raised concerns about the neurological health of then-Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton despite never having examined her in person.

Carlson set a hagiographic tone for the segment at the beginning, describing Trump’s supposed “remarkable turnaround” before allowing Siegel to conduct the interview. The two were not in the same room: Siegel was in a studio and Trump was in the White House, being filmed separately. Trump and Siegel’s conversation wandered, from Trump blaming China for the virus and repeatedly mentioning Regeneron (a company that gave him an experimental drug and with which he has personal ties) to describing himself as “very strong,” offering to donate his plasma and claiming that he has improved faster and better than others who have had COVID-19.

Despite these attempts to project that he was “virile,” Trump admitted that the disease had made him feel “tired,” adding that “my life is based a little bit on energy and I didn’t have it.” While downplaying his symptoms, however, Trump promised to freely give away the drugs that he has previously claimed constituted a “cure” for him. (Curiously, Trump has been consistently opposed to universal healthcare policies that might make such drugs free and accessible, though he was treated by the military healthcare system that has been likened to an exclusive form of universal healthcare).

Related Articles

Trump also stated that was “medication-free.” “I’m not taking any medications as of eight hours ago,” he claimed.

Trump also claimed that his Secret Service agents did not mind his Walter Reed hospital drive-by, which involved close physical contact with the security detail. Some current and former Secret Service agents interviewed by CNN were “frustrated” by Trump’s publicity stunt. “We’re not disposable,” one said.

Trump declined to say if he had received a test for the virus today that might definitively say if he had cleared the virus from his system. “I have been retested and I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet …. I’m at either the bottom of the scale or free,” the president said. Based on reports of infections, the CDC recommends that those who have had COVID-19 refrain from being around others until at least 10 days since their first symptoms appeared and 24 hours since their fever waned without the use of “fever-reducing medications.”

Trump also denied experiencing any of the psychological symptoms that frequently accompany dexamethasone, the steroid that he

Pelosi Unveils 25th Amendment Bid, Questions Trump’s Fitness | Political News

By LISA MASCARO, AP Congressional Correspondent

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled legislation Friday that would allow Congress to intervene under the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to remove the president, insisting it’s not about President Donald Trump but inspired by the need for greater congressional oversight of his White House.

Pelosi has been raising questions about Trump’s mental fitness since his COVID-19 diagnosis and demanding more transparency about his health. The bill would set up a commission to assess the president’s ability to lead the country and ensure a continuity of government. It comes one year after Pelosi’s House launched impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“This is not about President Donald Trump — he will face the judgment of the voters,” Pelosi said at a press conference at the Capitol.

Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, with no hopes of the bill becoming law, the rollout was quickly dismissed as a stunt by Trump’s team and top allies.

“It’s an absurd proposal,” said White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Fox.

“Absolutely absurd,” said Senate Majority Leader McConnell during an appearance in Shepherdsville, Kentucky.

The president’s opponents have discussed invoking the 25th Amendment for some time, but are raising it now, so close to Election Day, as the campaigns are fast turning into a referendum on Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Pelosi said Trump needs to disclose more about his health after his COVID-19 diagnosis and when, exactly, he first contracted COVID as others in the White House have become infected. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more have tested positive for the virus, which shows no signs of abating heading into what public health experts warn will be a difficult flu season and winter.

The legislation that would create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment, which was passed by Congress and ratified in 1967 as a way to ensure a continuity of power in the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

It says the vice president and a majority of principal officers of the executive departments “or of such other body as Congress” may by law provide a declaration to Congress that the president “is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” At that point, the vice president would immediately assume the powers of acting president.

“Let Congress exert the power the Constitution gave us,” Pelosi said Friday standing before a poster of the amendment.

Pelosi was joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a constitutional scholar, who has proposed similar bills in the past.

“In times of chaos we must hold fast to our Constitution,” he said Friday.

Raskin said the commission would be launched “only for the most extreme situations.”

But, as Congress showed by impeaching — and acquitting the president over the past year — the legislative branch is determined to exert itself at times as a check on the executive branch.

“Congress has a role to play,” Raskin said.

Trump says he “feels great”

Nancy Pelosi unveils 25th Amendment bid, questions Trump’s mental fitness

Washington — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled legislation Friday that would allow Congress to intervene under the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to remove the president, insisting it’s not about President Donald Trump but inspired by the need for greater congressional oversight of his White House.

Pelosi has been raising questions about Trump’s mental fitness since his COVID-19 diagnosis and demanding more transparency about his health. The bill would set up a commission to assess the president’s ability to lead the country and ensure a continuity of government. It comes one year after Pelosi’s House launched impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“This is not about President Donald Trump — he will face the judgment of the voters,” Pelosi said at a press conference at the Capitol.

Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, with no hopes of the bill becoming law, the rollout was quickly dismissed as a stunt by Trump’s team and top allies.

“It’s an absurd proposal,” said White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Fox.

“Absolutely absurd,” said Senate Majority Leader McConnell during an appearance in Shepherdsville, Kentucky.

The president’s opponents have discussed invoking the 25th Amendment for some time, but are raising it now, so close to Election Day, as the campaigns are fast turning into a referendum on Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Pelosi said Trump needs to disclose more about his health after his COVID-19 diagnosis and when, exactly, he first contracted COVID as others in the White House have become infected. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more have tested positive for the virus, which shows no signs of abating heading into what public health experts warn will be a difficult flu season and winter.

The legislation that would create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment, which was passed by Congress and ratified in 1967 as a way to ensure a continuity of power in the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

It says the vice president and a majority of principal officers of the executive departments “or of such other body as Congress” may by law provide a declaration to Congress that the president “is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” At that point, the vice president would immediately assume the powers of acting president.

“Let Congress exert the power the Constitution gave us,” Pelosi said Friday standing before a poster of the amendment.

Pelosi was joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a constitutional scholar, who has proposed similar bills in the past.

“In times of chaos we must hold fast to our Constitution,” he said Friday.

Raskin said the commission would be launched “only for the most extreme situations.”

But, as Congress showed by impeaching — and acquitting the president over the past year — the legislative branch is determined to exert itself at times as a check on the executive branch.

“Congress has a role to play,” Raskin said.

Trump says he “feels great” after being hospitalized and is back at

House Speaker Pelosi unveils 25th Amendment bid, questions President Trump’s fitness

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled legislation Friday that would allow Congress to intervene under the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to remove the president, insisting it’s not about President Donald Trump but inspired by the need for greater congressional oversight of his White House.Pelosi has been raising questions about Trump’s mental fitness since his COVID-19 diagnosis and demanding more transparency about his health. The bill would set up a commission to assess the president’s ability to lead the country and ensure a continuity of government. It comes one year after Pelosi’s House launched impeachment proceedings against Trump.“This is not about President Donald Trump — he will face the judgment of the voters,” Pelosi said at a press conference at the Capitol.Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, with no hopes of the bill becoming law, the rollout was quickly dismissed as a stunt by Trump’s team and top allies.“It’s an absurd proposal,” said White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Fox.”Absolutely absurd,” said Senate Majority Leader McConnell during an appearance in Shepherdsville, Kentucky.The president’s opponents have discussed invoking the 25th Amendment for some time, but are raising it now, so close to Election Day, as the campaigns are fast turning into a referendum on Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.Pelosi said Trump needs to disclose more about his health after his COVID-19 diagnosis and when, exactly, he first contracted COVID as others in the White House have become infected. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more have tested positive for the virus, which shows no signs of abating heading into what public health experts warn will be a difficult flu season and winter.The legislation that would create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment, which was passed by Congress and ratified in 1967 as a way to ensure a continuity of power in the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.It says the vice president and a majority of principal officers of the executive departments “or of such other body as Congress” may by law provide a declaration to Congress that the president “is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” At that point, the vice president would immediately assume the powers of acting president.“Let Congress exert the power the Constitution gave us,” Pelosi said Friday standing before a poster of the amendment.Pelosi was joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a constitutional scholar, who has proposed similar bills in the past.“In times of chaos we must hold fast to our Constitution,” he said Friday.Raskin said the commission would be launched “only for the most extreme situations.”But, as Congress showed by impeaching — and acquitting the president over the past year — the legislative branch is determined to exert itself at times as a check on the executive branch.“Congress has a role to play,” Raskin said.Trump says he “feels great” after being hospitalized and is back at work in the White House. But his doctors have given mixed signals about his diagnosis and treatment. Trump …

In 25th Amendment bid, Pelosi questions Trump’s fitness to serve

WASHINGTON — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is questioning President Donald Trump’s fitness to serve, announcing legislation Thursday that would create a commission to allow Congress to intervene under the 25th Amendment to the Constitution and remove the president from executive duties.

Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, Pelosi said Trump needs to disclose more about his health after his COVID-19 diagnosis. She noted Trump’s “strange tweet” halting talks on a new coronavirus aid package — he subsequently tried to reverse course — and said Americans need to know when, exactly, he first contracted COVID as others in the White House became infected. On Friday, she plans to roll out the legislation that would launch the commission for review.

“The public needs to know the health condition of the president,” Pelosi said, later invoking the 25th Amendment, which allows a president’s cabinet or Congress to intervene when a president is unable to conduct the duties of the office.

Trump responded swiftly via Twitter.

“Crazy Nancy is the one who should be under observation. They don’t call her Crazy for nothing!” the president said.

The president’s opponents have discussed invoking the 25th Amendment for some time, but are raising it now, so close to Election Day, as the campaigns are fast turning into a referendum on Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more infected by the virus that shows no signs of abating heading into what public health experts warn will be a difficult flu season and winter.

Trump says he “feels great” after being hospitalized and is back at work in the White House. But his doctors have given mixed signals about his diagnosis and treatment. Trump plans to resume campaigning soon.

Congress is not in legislative session, and so any serious consideration of the measure, let alone votes in the House or Senate, is unlikely. But the bill serves as a political tool to stoke questions about Trump’s health as his own White House is hit by an outbreak infecting top aides, staff and visitors, including senators.

In a stunning admission, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Thursday that he had stopped going to the White House two months ago because he disagreed with its coronavirus protocols. His last visit was Aug. 6.

“My impression was their approach to how to handle this was different from mine and what I insisted we do in the Senate, which is to wear a mask and practice social distancing,” McConnell said at a campaign stop in northern Kentucky for his own reelection.

On Friday, Pelosi along with Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a constitutional law professor, plan to roll out the legislation that would create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment, which was passed by Congress and ratified in 1967 as way to ensure a continuity of power in the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

It says the vice president and a majority of principal

Pelosi unveils 25th Amendment bid, questions Trump’s fitness

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled legislation Friday that would allow Congress to intervene under the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to remove the president, insisting it’s not about President Donald Trump but inspired by the need for greater congressional oversight of his White House.

Pelosi has been raising questions about Trump’s mental fitness since his COVID-19 diagnosis and demanding more transparency about his health. The bill would set up a commission to assess the president’s ability to lead the country and ensure a continuity of government. It comes one year after Pelosi’s House launched impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“This is not about President Donald Trump — he will face the judgment of the voters,” Pelosi said at a press conference at the Capitol.

Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, with no hopes of the bill becoming law, the rollout was quickly dismissed as a stunt by Trump’s team and top allies.


“It’s an absurd proposal,” said White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Fox.

“Absolutely absurd,” said Senate Majority Leader McConnell during an appearance in Shepherdsville, Kentucky.

The president’s opponents have discussed invoking the 25th Amendment for some time, but are raising it now, so close to Election Day, as the campaigns are fast turning into a referendum on Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Pelosi said Trump needs to disclose more about his health after his COVID-19 diagnosis and when, exactly, he first contracted COVID as others in the White House have become infected. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more have tested positive for the virus, which shows no signs of abating heading into what public health experts warn will be a difficult flu season and winter.

The legislation that would create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment, which was passed by Congress and ratified in 1967 as a way to ensure a continuity of power in the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

It says the vice president and a majority of principal officers of the executive departments “or of such other body as Congress” may by law provide a declaration to Congress that the president “is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” At that point, the vice president would immediately assume the powers of acting president.

“Let Congress exert the power the Constitution gave us,” Pelosi said Friday standing before a poster of the amendment.

Pelosi was joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a constitutional scholar, who has proposed similar bills in the past.

“In times of chaos we must hold fast to our Constitution,” he said Friday.

Raskin said the commission would be launched “only for the most extreme situations.”

But, as Congress showed by impeaching — and acquitting the president over the past year — the legislative branch is determined to exert itself at times as a check on the executive branch.

“Congress has a role to play,” Raskin said.

Trump says he “feels great” after being hospitalized and is back

Is six feet really a safe distance? Experts answer questions

CLOSE

This is how often you should wash your cloth face mask.

USA TODAY

Medical researchers are constantly learning new information about the coronavirus, leading to improved treatments and practices. At the same time, many questions remain unanswered, such as whether those who get infected develop immunity and, if so, for how long.

More concerning for public health experts is the abundance of misinformation about COVID-19, fueled in part by what they say are mixed messages from the federal government. On Monday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially recognized airborne transmission of the virus, after briefly acknowledging in September what the scientific community had been arguing for months, then taking down the guidance from its website days later.

Misconceptions about the potential severity of a disease that often doesn’t manifest any symptoms and the belief that it only threatens old, infirm folks are among the notions medical professionals want to dispel.

USA TODAY spoke to some of them seeking to clarify some common doubts:

Is six feet really a safe distance?: That’s more a rule of thumb than a hard-and-fast instruction. Much the determination depends on the level of ventilation and whether people are wearing masks. Six feet apart from others is generally safe outside, but not always inside.

“Under certain conditions, particularly indoors and in areas with poor airflow around un-masked people infected with COVID-19, the virus can be transmitted via an airborne route via so-called aerosols (very fine particles suspended in air),’’ said Dr. Benjamin Singer, pulmonary and critical care specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. “These particles can hang in the air and transmit over distances greater than six feet.’’

Mixed reaction: Americans have ‘conflicting’ feelings about President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis

What type of masks should the general public use?: Surgical masks, which are inexpensive and readily available, and cloth masks made out of thick cotton are effective at limiting the virus’ spread. They provide some protection for the wearers but more for those around them. Neck gaiters and masks made of stretchy fabric are not deemed as effective at preventing spread of infectious droplets.

Is indoor dining safe?: Experts still consider it risky, despite measures such as limiting the number of diners and keeping them distanced.

“One of the biggest risks with indoor dining is everyone has their masks off, and if the ventilation isn’t great, you can get sick,’’ said Dr. Eric Cioe-Peña, director of Global Health at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, New York, and an emergency room physician, adding that he would eat at restaurant outdoors but not indoors.

Does sanitizing door handles and high-touch surfaces make a difference?: Not much. Cioe-Peña calls it “mostly theater,’’ pointing out there are limited circumstances under which people can get infected from those surfaces.

Said Singer: “Available data do not point toward surfaces as major transmitters of infection, although routine sanitation of high-touch surfaces still makes common sense.’’

Can I get together safely with family and friends?: Yes, but preferably outdoors, in