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Executive Medicine of Texas puts the Spotlight on Alzheimer’s Disease

Deaths from Alzheimer’s disease are increasing exponentially, but gaining little attention from the general public due to the Covid19 pandemic and other issues. Executive Medicine of Texas is working diligently to change the narrative and place focus on education and prevention of this terrible disease. Their first move, is hosting the first Alzheimer’s and the Arts Event, which will showcase the film “Have You Heard about Greg?”

DALLAS (PRWEB) October 13, 2020

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, since the year 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s have increased by 146%. This is while deaths from heart disease have decreased by 7.8%. Alzheimer’s Disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the US, claiming more lives than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.

“Our patients are concerned about their brain health and so are we,” says Mark Anderson, MD and one of the founders of Executive Medicine of Texas. “Years ago we made cognitive testing part of our routine executive exams. Shockingly, we’ve seen a significant number of patients, younger than ever, who are complaining of some sort of cognitive disruption. As a physician, it’s alarming.”

The Alzheimer’s and the Arts Event is the first of many efforts that Executive Medicine of Texas will be pushing to raise awareness for the disease. “This is a special event,” states Judy Gaman, their CEO, “because we’re focusing on education while raising money for the Alzheimer’s Association and the Guzman 23 Foundation.” Gaman, who knows from family experience just how devastating this disease can be, is championing the effort. “Having people like Steve Ecclesine, Greg O’Brian, and Warren Honeycutt involved so heavily in the Alzheimer’s and the Arts event brings it to a whole new level.

Steve Ecclesine, a Hollywood producer with over 700 films and TV shows to his credit is the producer of the film Have You Heard about Greg? He will be at the event for a Q&A session directly following the premier event. The film, showcasing the life of Greg O’Brian as he battles Alzheimer’s, has not yet been released. “I’m very interested to receive feedback from the audience and share the story of how this documentary came to be. Out of all the films I’ve worked on, this one is near and dear to my heart.” Those attendees who wish too will receive a chance to give on-screen testimonials about the films impact that will become part of the films marketing efforts.

Greg O’Brian’s highly acclaimed internationally award-winning book On Pluto: Inside the Mind of Alzheimer’s, is the first book written by an investigative reporter who’s actually inside the mind of Alzheimer’s. Much like the book, the film, Have You Heard about Greg? shows what Greg and others have learned about the disease and uses science, faith, hope, and humor to broach a topic that needs much more attention.

Warren Honeycutt, six-time Mr. America Fitness finalist, media fitness expert and author of the book How the Health Are You? has also worked tirelessly on this project and will be at

Soaring virus infection puts more French cities on alert

PARIS (AP) — Four French cities have joined Paris and Marseille in the maximum alert status to fight the spread of the coronavirus, and it appeared likely that the list would soon grow as infections soar.

Bars shut down and other severe measures are ordered under maximum alert.

Lyon, Grenoble and Saint-Etienne in the southeast and Lille in the north moved to maximum alert on Saturday when health authorities reported nearly 26,900 new daily infections in 24 hours. There were just under 5,000 new hospitalizations over the past week, with 928 of them in ICUs, and the positive rate for the increasing number of COVID-19 tests climbed to 11%. Nearly 32,690 coronavirus deaths have been counted in France, but the actual number is likely higher due to deaths at home and incomplete reporting from hospitals or rest homes.

While France girded itself for a climb in critical numbers, a consultation by the National Order of Nurses published Sunday suggested that a significant number feel tired and fed up, with 37% saying that the coronavirus pandemic is making them want to change jobs.


Nearly 59,400 nurses responded to the Oct. 2-7 internal survey on the impact of the health crisis on their working conditions, out of 350,000 in the Order of Nurses. A spokesman for the order, Adrien de Casabianca, described the survey as a “consultation” without the classic methodology of a poll.

The numbers painted a grim diagnosis of the profession and suggested that French medical facilities may not be keeping pace with the growing need, despite lessons that should have been learned from the height of the virus crisis last spring.

Of nurses in public establishments, 43% feel that “we are not better prepared collectively to respond to a new wave of infections,” according to the survey. The figure rises to 46% for nurses in the private domain. And about two-thirds of respondents say their working conditions have deteriorated since the start of the crisis.

Burnout looms, the survey shows, with 57% of respondents saying they have been professionally exhausted since the start of pandemic, while nearly half saying there’s a strong risk that fatigue will impact the quality of care patients receive.

For 37% of the nurses responding, “the crisis … makes them want to change jobs,” and 43% “don’t know if they will still be nurses in five years,” according to the survey.

The National Order of Nurses notes that 34,000 nurses’ jobs in France are currently vacant.

Nurses and other health professionals in France and elsewhere have sporadically demonstrated for higher salaries, better working conditions and more personnel, even during the pandemic. They were given small salary hikes in France starting this fall.

“Today, nurses must deal with a growth in COVID-19 cases and feel unarmed to do so,” the president of the National Order of Nurses, Patrick Chamboredon, said in a statement accompanying the survey.

With nurses “indispensable” to the functioning of the health system, “we cannot accept that,” he said.

The head of the

Supreme Court puts on hold Trump administration request to reimpose medication abortion restrictions

“While COVID-19 has provided the ground for restrictions on First Amendment rights, the District Court saw the pandemic as a ground for expanding the abortion right recognized in Roe v. Wade,” wrote Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., who was joined by Justice Clarence Thomas.

Alito said the court has “stood by” while officials imposed restrictions on religious activities and “drastically limited speech, banning or restricting public speeches, lectures, meetings, and rallies.”

The court’s action in this case cannot be squared with that, Alito wrote.

Chuang ruled in July that requiring an in-person visit to obtain the medications needed to induce abortion was unduly burdensome. There is no requirement that a woman take the medication in a clinic setting, and most take the pills that end a pregnancy in its early stages at home.

At the request of abortion providers and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Chuang imposed a nationwide injunction against the Food and Drug Administration directive.

After a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit refused to put Chuang’s order on hold, acting solicitor general Jeffrey B. Wall went to the Supreme Court.

Instead of agreeing with the government’s petition, the court’s order issued Thursday night directed Chuang to “promptly consider a motion by the government to dissolve, modify, or stay the injunction, including on the ground that relevant circumstances have changed.”

The case took on added significance because it was the first abortion order issued after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the court’s most outspoken advocate for abortion rights.

The unsigned order and compromise decision may indicate the court was deadlocked, although only Thomas and Alito declared their views.

Wall told the court that, even in the pandemic, the government had not changed its views on how the drugs should be dispensed.

“The FDA has made, and continuously adhered to, the judgment that these requirements mitigate serious health risks associated with the drug, which can increase if the patient delays taking the drug or fails to receive proper counseling about possible complications,” Wall wrote.

Abortion providers told the court that there was no reason an in-office visit was necessary.

The rules “force patients seeking early abortion care and their health care providers to unnecessarily risk exposure to a life-threatening disease by mandating that patients travel to a health center for the sole purpose of picking up a pill and signing a form,” Julia H. Kaye of the American Civil Liberties Union wrote in a brief to the court.

Medication abortions require taking two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol, up to 10 weeks into a pregnancy. They have been in use since 2000, and in 2016 the FDA eliminated the requirement that the first drug be administered in a hospital, clinic or doctor’s office. FDA experts said it was just as safe for a woman to take the medications at home.

But the FDA did not relax the requirement that women pick up the pills in person and sign for

President Trump Is Getting an ‘Unprecedented’ Mix of COVID-19 Treatments. That Puts Him On the Cutting Edge of Coronavirus Care

U.S. President Trump waves from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center.
U.S. President Trump waves from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center.

U.S. President Trump waves from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020. Credit – Alex Edelman—AFP/Getty Images

With each day since U.S. President Donald Trump reported that he tested positive for COVID-19, his doctors have added a new major therapy to treat the disease, for a total of three at this point.

On Friday—the same day that Trump said he tested positive—the President received an experimental combination of two monoclonal antibodies to help his immune system fight the coronavirus infection, according to his physician, Sean Conley. The next day—after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center—he received the drug remdesivir, which blocks the coronavirus’s ability to make more copies of itself. Remdesivir is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but has received emergency use authorization for treating COVID-19. On Sunday—day three—Trump’s doctors revealed he’s also taking dexamethasone, a corticosteroid typically administered to control the inflammatory response common in more advanced stages of the disease.

While the monoclonal antibodies are designed to be used in non-hospitalized patients early in their infection—as the President apparently was when he received them—remdesivir was originally only authorized for hospitalized patients who are moderately to severely ill and in intensive care. That authorization has only recently been expanded, on Aug. 28, to include any hospitalized patient. Still, even hospitalized patients who may not need intensive care and receive remdesivir are generally further along in their disease than the President appears to be. Furthermore, patients who receive the drug are generally enrolled in trials, so researchers can learn more about its safety and effectiveness. In rare exceptions, doctors can apply for compassionate use outside of these studies, which is presumably what Trump received. (In the early months of the pandemic, many doctors applied for this special dispensation until larger studies were established to increase access to the medication after it showed encouraging results.)

“The thing that is odd is that in most trials people usually have symptoms eight, nine or 10 days before they are enrolled in the trial,” says Dr. Walid Gellad, director of the center for pharmaceutical policy and prescribing at the University of Pittsburgh, about remdesivir. “From that standpoint, it’s a little unprecedented that anyone so early [in their disease] would be receiving it.”

Similarly, dexamethasone, a steroid approved to reduce inflammation and suppress overactive immune reactions triggered by autoimmune diseases, is also recommended for patients long into their battle with COVID-19 and who are showing more severe symptoms. The steroid seems to reduce the inflammation that can compromise respiratory tissues and ultimately make it difficult for patients to breathe. But both the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization recommend dexamethasone only for hospitalized patients who need supplemental oxygen or are on a ventilator. The NIH guidance specifically advises

Donald Trump’s positive coronavirus test puts him in the company of Boris Johnson and Jair Bolsonaro



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: HERTFORD, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 04: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson shakes hands with US President Donald Trump onstage during the annual NATO heads of government summit on December 4, 2019 in Watford, England. France and the UK signed the Treaty of Dunkirk in 1947 in the aftermath of WW2 cementing a mutual alliance in the event of an attack by Germany or the Soviet Union. The Benelux countries joined the Treaty and in April 1949 expanded further to include North America and Canada followed by Portugal, Italy, Norway, Denmark and Iceland. This new military alliance became the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO). The organisation grew with Greece and Turkey becoming members and a re-armed West Germany was permitted in 1955. This encouraged the creation of the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact delineating the two sides of the Cold War. This year marks the 70th anniversary of NATO. (Photo by Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images)


© Steve Parsons/Pool via Getty
HERTFORD, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 04: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson shakes hands with US President Donald Trump onstage during the annual NATO heads of government summit on December 4, 2019 in Watford, England. France and the UK signed the Treaty of Dunkirk in 1947 in the aftermath of WW2 cementing a mutual alliance in the event of an attack by Germany or the Soviet Union. The Benelux countries joined the Treaty and in April 1949 expanded further to include North America and Canada followed by Portugal, Italy, Norway, Denmark and Iceland. This new military alliance became the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO). The organisation grew with Greece and Turkey becoming members and a re-armed West Germany was permitted in 1955. This encouraged the creation of the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact delineating the two sides of the Cold War. This year marks the 70th anniversary of NATO. (Photo by Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump is not the only leader on the world stage to have contracted coronavirus.

His positive test, announced in the early hours of Friday, puts him in the company of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro and Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin.

Of those, Johnson fell the most gravely ill after he tested positive for the virus at the end of March. He spent a week in hospital, with three nights in intensive care and, on being discharged admitted “things could have gone either way” for him. Even after leaving the hospital, he had to spend time recuperating at his official country residence, Chequers.

Johnson’s illness, at the height of Britain’s first wave of infections, complicated the government’s response, not least because the virus spread through the government’s ranks in Westminster.

Trump and his wife Melania, who has also tested positive for the virus, may be asymptomatic or have only mild symptoms, as was the case with Britain’s health minister Matt Hancock.

At 74 years old and overweight, Trump — who has spent months playing down the severity of the pandemic as US deaths have surpassed 207,000 — falls into the highest risk category for serious complications from the disease. But the first lady, age 50, is likely to be at a lower risk of serious illness.

Johnson tweeted his best wishes to Trump and the first lady, saying he hoped “they both have a speedy recovery from coronavirus.”

The US President and first lady can expect to receive the best care the country can offer. But some fear that the full picture is not being given.

Even when the British Prime Minister was in hospital, daily briefings from Downing Street breezily proclaimed he was in “good spirits” when in fact — by Johnson’s own account later — the situation was significantly more serious.

Disregard for masks, distancing

In Brazil, populist leader Bolsonaro, like Trump, spent months downplaying the threat from coronavirus, like Trump, dismissing it as just a “little flu” and assuring his compatriots they had little

CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta puts Trump’s odds of surviving COVID-19 at ‘greater than 90 percent’

President Trump tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night, and “obviously, given the president’s age and his pre-existing illnesses, he’s going to be at increased risk from this disease,” CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta said on Friday morning’s New Day. “Still, the odds are very much in his favor … greater than 90 percent, 95 percent chance that he will get through this.”

We know that his age, 244 pounds of weight, heart disease, and cholesterol level put Trump at higher risk, Gupta said. “When you’re at his age, 65 to 74, it’s about a five times greater likelihood that somebody will be hospitalized for this, as compared to somebody younger.” But we don’t know lots of other important information, he added, like whether he has symptoms or when he was infected, and “we still don’t have full vision on his past medical history,” including the story behind “that strange visit to Walter Reed back in November.”

Either way, Trump now has to isolate — not quarantine, isolate — for up to 14 days now, Gupta advised. and everyone he’s been in contact with will “need to be quarantined, not just tested.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson “kept on working for several days and then it got worse over time,” George Stephanopoulos said on Friday’s Good Morning America. ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton said Trump will likely avoid the worst but not get off scot free: “About 80 percent of people infected with COVID-19 do not require hospitalization. That doesn’t mean, though, that their disease course will be mild. It just means that they can be managed in a home environment. And we also know that 45 percent of those infected — up to 45 percent — will show no symptoms.”

More stories from theweek.com
Could Trump have infected Biden with COVID-19 at the debate? Yes, but it’s unlikely.
Late night hosts have a pretty good idea why Trump shockingly refuses to condemn white supremacists
Trump flew to New Jersey for a fundraiser, reportedly after learning Hope Hicks had COVID-19 symptoms

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