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Dentist reveals how much toothpaste you should REALLY put on a toothbrush

Are you RUINING your teeth by using too much toothpaste? Dentist reveals the amount you REALLY need when brushing – and warns that too much can cause stains and ‘pits in the teeth’

  • Dr. Gao Jye Teh, a graduate of King’s College in London, has gone viral with a TikTok video about toothpaste
  • He says the amount of toothpaste shown in ads is more than people need
  • For kids under age three, just a smear is the right amount
  • Anyone age three or older should use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste
  • Dr. Gao warned that people who use too much can ingest large amounts of fluoride, a mineral that helps to prevent tooth decay, but also causes staining
  • ‘Fluoride, when ingested in large amounts, can cause a cosmetic condition known as dental fluorosis on the developing teeth,’ he explained

A Malaysian dentist has shocked TikTok users by revealing how much toothpaste people should really be putting on their toothbrushes — and it’s a lot less than most people think.

Dr. Gao Jye Teh, a graduate of King’s College in London, has gone viral with a video in which he shows that the amount of toothpaste often used in commercials is actually too much.

Instead, he says, anyone over age three only needs a dollop of toothpaste as big as a single pea.

Surprising: Dr. Gao Jye Teh , a graduate of King’s College in London, has gone viral with a video revealing how much toothpaste people should use

Surprising: Dr. Gao Jye Teh , a graduate of King’s College in London, has gone viral with a video revealing how much toothpaste people should use

'The amount of toothpaste used in commercials is way too much,' he says after he squeezes out a long line of toothpaste over all the bristles on a toothbrush

‘The amount of toothpaste used in commercials is way too much,’ he says after he squeezes out a long line of toothpaste over all the bristles on a toothbrush

In his TikTok video, which has been viewed over six million times, Dr. Gao first squeezes out a long line of toothpaste over all the bristles on a toothbrush.

‘The amount of toothpaste used in commercials is way too much,’ he writes.

He then shows that children under age three only need a tiny smear of toothpaste.  

‘They might have trouble not swallowing the excess fluoride toothpaste,’ he explained to Buzzfeed, noting that too much can be detrimental to little kids, whose adult teeth are still developing underneath their gums, 

As for anyone over age three, not that much more is necessary: just a pea-sized amount is perfect.

Children under age three only need a tiny smear of toothpaste

'They might have trouble not swallowing the excess fluoride toothpaste,' he explained

Children under age three only need a tiny smear of toothpaste. ‘They might have trouble not swallowing the excess fluoride toothpaste,’ he explained

Ta-da! As for anyone over age three, not that much more is necessary: just a pea-sized amount is perfect

Ta-da! As for anyone over age three, not that much more is necessary: just a pea-sized amount is perfect

‘This is because fluoride, when ingested in large amounts, can cause a cosmetic condition known as dental fluorosis on the developing teeth. The cosmetic implications range from mild discoloration to yellow and brown stains to obvious pits in the teeth,’ he said.

Using less can prevent this from happening — and a pea-sized amount is

Trump seeks to put COVID-19 behind him, get back to election campaign

By Andrea Shalal

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Donald Trump is no longer a transmission risk for COVID-19, his doctor said late on Saturday, as the U.S. president seeks to put his bout with coronavirus behind him and return to the campaign fray.

Trump, trailing his Democratic challenger Joe Biden in opinion polls, addressed supporters from a White House balcony on Saturday afternoon. He urged a crowd of hundreds of largely Black and Latino supporters to help get out the vote in the Nov. 3 election.

His physician Sean Conley said in a statement later that Trump had taken a test on Saturday showing he was no longer “a transmission risk to others,” and there was no longer evidence “of actively replicating virus.”

The White House had no immediate comment on whether Conley’s statement meant Trump had actually tested negative for the coronavirus.

Trump first revealed that he had tested positive on Oct. 2, and spent three days in hospital. The White House has not disclosed when Trump last tested negative.

Trump is eager to get back on the campaign trail after an absence of more than a week. He plans to travel to the key battleground state of Florida on Monday, followed by rallies in Pennsylvania and Iowa on Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively.

“I’m feeling great,” he told the crowd.

The president’s illness has cast a spotlight on the pandemic, which has infected nearly 7.7 million people in the United States and killed over 213,000. His administration has faced criticism for its handling of the crisis, and for its lax approach to mask-wearing and social distancing in the White House. At least 11 close Trump aides have tested positive for coronavirus.

Speaking firmly and with no sign of the raspy throat evident in recent interviews, Trump delivered a shorter-than-usual campaign speech.

He attacked Democrats as pursuing a “socialist” or even “Communist” agenda, and hailed his own record in fighting crime and boosting the U.S. economy, while flag-waving supporters cheered and chanted, “We love you.”

Democrats and some commentators criticized Saturday’s event for potentially exposing a new batch of supporters to the virus and for using a federal building as an election prop.

Asked about it in New Castle, Delaware, Biden said he hoped the president and his supporters were taking precautions.

“They should be socially distant and wearing masks,” he said. “It’s the only responsible thing to do.”

Trump standing alone at the event, was not wearing a mask as he spoke. In the crowd, most were wearing masks but not following social distancing guidelines.

Trump repeated past calls for states to reopen their economies even as new cases hit a two-month high on Friday. A Reuters analysis showed more than 58,000 infections were reported and hospitalizations in the Midwest hit a record for a fifth successive day.

Opinion polls show Biden with a substantial lead nationally, although with a narrower advantage in some of the states that may decide the election outcome.

(Reporting by Andrea Shalal and Jason

Trump put on steroid recommended for severe Covid-19 cases, even as doctors share upbeat outlook

  • President Trump’s doctors said that they had begun treating him with a steroid that has shown promise for critically ill patients but may cause harm to those with less severe cases of Covid-19. 
  • The revelation, which came as part of an upbeat briefing on the president’s condition, raised further questions about Trump’s health as the 74-year-old wrestles with the virus.
  • White House physician Sean Conley said the president’s medical team had begun treating the president with dexamethasone.



a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building: Acting White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows holds the door for Sean Conley(front C), Physician to US President Donald Trump, and other members of the President's medical team as they arrive to give an update on the President's health at Walter Reed Medical Center during treatment for a COVID-19 infection October 4, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.


© Provided by CNBC
Acting White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows holds the door for Sean Conley(front C), Physician to US President Donald Trump, and other members of the President’s medical team as they arrive to give an update on the President’s health at Walter Reed Medical Center during treatment for a COVID-19 infection October 4, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.

President Donald Trump’s doctors said Sunday that they had begun treating him with dexamethasone, a steroid that has shown promise for critically ill patients but may cause harm to those with less severe cases of Covid-19. 

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The revelation, which came as part of an upbeat briefing on the president’s condition, raised further questions about Trump’s health as the 74-year-old wrestles with the virus that has killed more than 200,000 Americans.

Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, an infectious diseases physician at the Boston University School of Medicine, said the steroid treatment suggests that Trump has a level of inflammation that warrants the use of steroids despite the fact that the drug also suppresses the immune system. 

“That they made a conscious decision that the benefit of giving steroids outweighs the risk implies a higher degree of severity than what we knew on Friday and Saturday,” Bhadelia said in an email.

Another expert, Dr. Vin Gupta, said the doctors’ disclosures may indicate that Trump could be suffering from pneumonia.

“The treatment the doctors report they administered suggest the president has COVID pneumonia of at least mild severity,” said Gupta, a member of the faculty at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

The briefing took place outside the Walter Reed military hospital in Bethesda, Md., where the president has been treated since Friday. 

White House physician Sean Conley said the president’s medical team had begun treating the president with dexamethasone. The course of treatment came in response to two incidents in which Trump’s blood oxygen levels dipped below normal levels in recent days. 

Conley also said that Trump could be discharged as soon as Monday and said his health was improving.

Bhadelia said she generally would not discharge someone who was just put on steroids.

The Trump medical team’s announcement complicated assessments of how dire the president’s case is, particularly in light of the caginess that has surrounded details about the president’s health.

Video: Medical experts unsure why Trump was given experimental treatment (MSNBC)

Medical experts unsure why Trump was given experimental treatment

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UP NEXT

According to the World Health Organization, dexamethasone has been shown to reduce 28-day

Andrew Cuomo on coronavirus response: ‘I put my head on the pillow at night saying I saved lives’

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday appeared to boast of his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, declaring during a conference call: “I put my head on the pillow at night saying I saved lives, that’s how I sleep at night.”

The Democratic received some pushback online, with many pointing to his March 25th mandate to send coronavirus patients to nursing homes from hospitals – a decision some say factored in to nearly 6,000 deaths.

In this Sept. 29, 2020 photo provided by the Office of New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, Gov. Cuomo delivers a COVID-19 update during a briefing in New York City. 

In this Sept. 29, 2020 photo provided by the Office of New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, Gov. Cuomo delivers a COVID-19 update during a briefing in New York City. 
(Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo via AP)

The mandate required nursing homes to take in patients so long as they were medically stable. The nursing homes were further prohibited from testing incoming residents for the virus before they arrived.

More than 6,300 COVID-positive patients were admitted to nursing homes between March 25 and May, according to a report from the New York state health department. The high number of admitted patients has been widely blamed for the state’s official care home death toll of more than 6,600.

An analysis from the state health department determined that there was no causal link because “the timing of admissions versus fatalities shows that it could not be the driver of nursing home infections of fatalities.”

Still, Cuomo’s mandate stoked the ire of a lot of nursing homes. Rob Astorino, a Republican candidate in the 40th district State Senate race told 77WABC’s Lidia Curanaj that the nursing home owners he spoke to “were upset by Cuomo’s directive.”

TED CRUZ, CHRIS CUOMO GET INTO SLUGFEST AFTER SENATOR RIPS GOV. CUOMO’S COVID RESPONSE

“They were overwhelmed with sick patients, understaffed, and lacking in the proper PPE as well as equipment to treat and protect others from catching the virus.”

Pressed on the matter Wednesday during the conference call, Cuomo rejected the premise that the number of nursing home fatalities was linked to his March 25th mandate.

“The premise of your question is just factually wrong, the virus preys on senior citizens,” Cuomo said.

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As of Thursday, the virus has claimed some 33,159 deaths out of 76,754 cases recorded in New York since the pandemic began, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University.

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