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A Canadian spin studio followed public health guidelines. But 61 people still caught the covid-19.

Now, despite appearing to have complied with public health regulations, at least 61 people linked to the studio have tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

“They had done all sorts of things to remove the potential for spread,” Richardson told reporters. “Unfortunately, gyms are a higher-risk place because of the fact that generally people are taking off their masks, they’re breathing at a higher rate.”

Although Hamilton requires masks to be worn in most public settings, the law includes an exemption for anyone “actively engaged in an athletic or fitness activity.” In keeping with that policy, the studio, SPINCO, allowed riders to remove their masks once clipped into their bikes, and told them to cover up again before dismounting.

In a recent Instagram post, SPINCO’s owners said that they had been “hesitant” to reopen after getting the green light in July, and would not resume classes “until it is safe to do so.” Health officials have said that the studio is temporarily closed and cooperating fully with the investigation.

“We took all the measures public health offered, even added a few, and still the pandemic struck us again!’” the owners wrote. SPINCO has more than a dozen locations across Canada.

As of Tuesday, 44 cases linked to specific classes were detected, Richardson said. An additional 17 instances of “secondary cases” were found among other contacts.

The city will reexamine gym protocols, Richardson added Tuesday, but in the meantime, “what seems to be the case is that you need to wear that mask” even though government guidelines do not strictly require it.

“It’s still a good idea to do it, in terms of keeping others safe,” she said.

People should also avoid “classes where you’ve got that kind of yelling or coaching over music.”

She declined to use the term “superspreader” to describe the event but said it is a “very large outbreak.”

“It is concerning that it is extended beyond the initial cases who were related to the classes but gone into of course their household contacts and other contacts,” she said. “We continue to look at what does it mean, what do we need to understand about exercise classes?”

The outbreak offers further evidence of the dangers of people gathering indoors without masks, as health experts warn that cases could spike further in the coming months as winter weather sets in and outdoor gatherings and exercise classes will be harder to maintain.

In August, South Korea confirmed dozens of cases linked to a single Starbucks in the city of Paju where many customers did not wear masks. The store employees, who wore masks, were not infected. The outbreak prompted Starbucks to limit its indoor seating in the country and encourage masks among patrons.

In other instances, mask usage has been credited with preventing potential outbreaks. In May, after the reopening of a hair salon in Missouri that required masks, two stylists — who had worked with more than 100 clients — tested positive for the virus. But masks were

Public health warns of COVID-19 exposure at Trenton dentist’s office

Hastings Prince Edward Public Health is warning residents of the possibility of exposure to COVID-19 at a Trenton dentist’s office after a second person linked to the business has tested positive for COVID-19.

According to the health unit, two cases of the disease were linked to You Make Me Smile Dental Centre on Division Street last week. Despite these cases, the public health unit says there is low risk of exposure at the dentist’s office.

Read more:
Kingston, Belleville public health offer support to local back to school plans

As the second case has been identified, public health is asking anyone who visited the dental centre between Sept. 28 and Oct. 6 to self-monitor and to get tested if symptoms develop. If you do have symptoms and get tested, you must self-isolate for 14 days from the last visit to the dental centre, regardless of the results, the health unit said. You do not have to self-isolate unless you are showing symptoms.

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Public health said it will follow up with those considered to be at a higher risk of exposure.

“While HPEPH does not typically disclose the location of COVID-19 cases in order to protect individuals’ privacy, this information is disclosed when needed in order to meet public health objectives such as reducing the risk of further transmission,” the public health unit said in a press release Wednesday.

Read more:
No COVID-19 outbreak at Queen’s University, KFL&A medical officer of health says

The office closed voluntarily on Oct. 7 and will remain closed until Oct. 21.

There are currently six active cases of COVID-19 in the Hastings and Prince Edward regions, with 61 total cases since the pandemic began, of which 50 people have recovered and five have died.




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Trump’s rapid recovery from Covid-19, while welcome, ‘amplifies’ public misunderstanding of disease

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing in Washington, D.C.

Erin Scot | Pool | Reuters

Health officials have struggled to convey the seriousness of Covid-19 to many Americans. President Trump’s rapid recovery from the disease, while welcome by all, makes the challenge even more difficult, Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases acknowledged.

Trump’s quick bounce-back from his infection will likely underscore the mistaken belief some people have that the disease does not present significant health risks, Fauci said in an interview with STAT.

“We’re all glad that the president of the United States did not suffer any significant consequences of it,” Fauci said. “But … because he is such a visible figure, it amplifies some of that misunderstanding that people have that it’s a benign disease and nobody has anything to worry about.”

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The wide range of clinical manifestations of the disease — some people experience no symptoms, while others have everything from flu-like symptoms to life-threatening and even fatal pneumonia and blood clots — makes conveying the dangerousness of Covid-19 incredibly challenging, he said.

“It’s just a lot of understandable mixed signals, that it’s either serious or it’s not serious. It’s deadly or it’s not deadly. To me, that’s been the bane of trying to get a message across to people,” he said.

“It’s a problem that goes well beyond the president’s illness.”

Trump, who was considered at high risk of having severe Covid-19 because of his age, weight, and sex, was hospitalized for four days earlier this month after testing positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes Covid-19. First lady Melania Trump also tested positive for the virus; White House doctors described her case as milder than the president’s. She did not need to be hospitalized.

The president required supplemental oxygen on at least two occasions before he was taken by helicopter to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 2. In the four days he was there, Trump was treated with an experimental antibody cocktail, the antiviral drug remdesivir, and the steroid dexamethasone.

He has since resumed work, holding a rally Monday in Florida where he declared himself to be immune to Covid-19, and heading to Iowa, a Covid-19 hot spot, on Wednesday. He has also tweeted that people should not let fear of the disease run their lives, asserting that he feels better now than he did 20 years ago.

Trump also continues to insist the virus will soon disappear, even though daily infection numbers are climbing in most parts of the country. So far in the pandemic, more than 7.8 million Americans have been infected and more than 215,000 have died.

Since movement restrictions were eased in the summer, many cases have occurred in young adults, a demographic group that rarely dies from the disease. Fauci and others have struggled to find a way to persuade people

Amid rising Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations, local leaders and public health experts worry of a coming surge

With 33 states reporting a rise in new Covid-19 cases and a nationwide uptick in hospitalizations, local officials worry this could be the beginning of the coming surge experts have warned about.



a person standing in a parking lot: A medic prepares to transfer a patient on a stretcher from an ambulance outside of Emergency at Coral Gables Hospital where Coronavirus patients are treated in Coral Gables near Miami, on July 30, 2020. - Florida has emerged as a major new epicenter of the US battle against the disease, with confirmed cases recently surpassing New York and now second only to California. The state toll has leapt over the past week and more than 6,500 people have died from the disease there, according to health officials. More than 460,000 people have been infected with the virus in Florida, which has a population of 21 million, and a quarter of the state's cases are in Miami. The US has tallied a total of 151,826 deaths from COVID-19, making it the hardest-hit country in the world. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)


© CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP/Getty Images
A medic prepares to transfer a patient on a stretcher from an ambulance outside of Emergency at Coral Gables Hospital where Coronavirus patients are treated in Coral Gables near Miami, on July 30, 2020. – Florida has emerged as a major new epicenter of the US battle against the disease, with confirmed cases recently surpassing New York and now second only to California. The state toll has leapt over the past week and more than 6,500 people have died from the disease there, according to health officials. More than 460,000 people have been infected with the virus in Florida, which has a population of 21 million, and a quarter of the state’s cases are in Miami. The US has tallied a total of 151,826 deaths from COVID-19, making it the hardest-hit country in the world. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)

In Colorado, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock said Covid-19 cases are rising at a “concerning rate,” while the city’s seven-day average daily case rates are as “high right now as they were at the height of the pandemic back in May.”

The seven-day average of hospitalizations also rose about 37% in a little more than a week, he said during a Monday news conference, and warned residents could soon see tighter Covid-19 restrictions if the city’s numbers continue to trend in the wrong direction.

Officials across the country warn of similar patterns. White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx last week warned the Northeast was seeing “early surggestions” of alarming trends. Kentucky’s governor said recently the state is seeing a third major escalation in infections. In Wisconsin, a field hospital is opening this week in response to a surge of Covid-19 patients — days after the state reported record-high numbers of Covid-19 cases, hospitalizations and daily deaths.

The US is now averaging more than 49,000 new infections daily — up 14% from the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. And last week, the nation recorded more than 50,000 new cases for at least four days in a row. The last time that happened was in early August.

“I think we’re facing a whole lot of trouble,” Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNBC on Monday. “We’ve got to turn this around.”

That doesn’t have to mean another lockdown, the infectious disease expert has previously said. Instead, it means more people heeding to safety guidelines like wearing masks and social distancing.

Otherwise, the US could be in for a devastating winter. Researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project more than 135,000 Americans could die within the next three months.

Healthcare professionals ‘deeply afraid’

Hospitalizations nationwide are also on the rise. At least 10 states have recorded record-high hospitalization

UVDI Announces UV-C Device Presentations at the 16th World Congress on Public Health 2020

Ultraviolet Devices, Inc. (UVDI), a global leader in UV-C surface disinfecting and indoor air quality products, today announced its first Italian hospital studies demonstrating the advanced effectiveness of the UVDI-360 Room Sanitizer will be presented at the 16th World Congress on Public Health 2020, taking place October 12 – 16, 2020. The novel research, conducted by Dr. Gabriele Messina, Associate Professor of Public Health, University of Siena, at the Rugani Hospital Monteriggioni in Siena, demonstrates the UVDI-360’s ability to inactivate pathogens in the hospital environment as part of varied cleaning protocols, in multiple high-risk locations and at different disinfecting cycle times.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201011005076/en/

Researchers from the University of Siena will present “Six ultraviolet minutes for cleaner operating theatres” at the 16th World Congress on Public Health 2020. (Photo: Business Wire)

Presentations from Dr. Messina and his Team at the University of Siena include:

(1) one poster sharing preliminary data of a cross-sectional study measuring overall pathogen reduction on high-touch surfaces in hospital rooms pre-and-post use of the UVDI-360 Room Sanitizer as a supplement to terminal cleaning. Preliminary findings conclude 83% of sites sampled had 0 CFU following the use of the UVDI-360 Room Sanitizer.

(2) a second poster sharing preliminary data of a cross-sectional study demonstrating overall pathogen reduction in operating rooms in six minutes with the UVDI-360 Room Sanitizer used in multiple protocols: with no manual cleaning, manual cleaning in-between operating room use and as a supplement to manual terminal cleaning.

(3) an oral presentation sharing research demonstrating 3-and-4-log reductions of Candida auris at 2.44 meters using the UVDI-360 Room Sanitizer.

(4) a third poster illustrating a simulation model of microbe distribution on surfaces to inform future UV-C testing.

Title: Six ultraviolet minutes for cleaner operating theatres
Track:
Health Technology Assessment
Abstract: #DJ-15

Title: Analytical approach for a better control of environmental contamination
Track:
Hospital hygiene (including AMR), healthcare-associated infections (HAI)
Abstract: #DN-18

Title: A simulation model of microbe overlapping for the correct estimation of UV-C device log-reduction
Track:
Healthcare Technology Assessment
Abstract: #DJ-14

Oral Presentation: Tuning a UV-C device to challenge new threats in the sanitization setting of healthcare facilities
Date and Time:
October 13th, 12:15-13:15

Poster abstracts are accessible via the World Congress website, https://wcph2020.com/. The poster presentations may be accessed through UVDI’s website following their presentation.

About UVDI

UVDI’s Mission is to make a cleaner, safer, and healthier world through advanced UV-C solutions that disinfect the air and surfaces in the environments we live, work, and play in. Founded in 1949 by Louis Veloz, UVDI designs and makes next-generation germicidal Ultraviolet light solutions in California applying over 70 years and three generations of family craftsmanship and care. The UVDI-360 Room Sanitizer is now used globally in over 25 countries in the world’s leading hospitals, where it has been proven in peer-reviewed, published studies to reduce Healthcare-Associated Infections and inactivate the highest-risk pathogens. UVDI is proud to be a certified Minority

Shenzhen-listed traditional medicine makers ride high on endorsement by public face of China’s fight against coronavirus



a man cutting a cake: A traditional Chinese medicine pharmacy in Weinan City, in China’s northwest Shaanxi Province. The overall industry has stalled, with only 17 out of 68 TCM makers recording year-on-year growth in revenue in the first half of 2020. Photo: Xinhua


A traditional Chinese medicine pharmacy in Weinan City, in China’s northwest Shaanxi Province. The overall industry has stalled, with only 17 out of 68 TCM makers recording year-on-year growth in revenue in the first half of 2020. Photo: Xinhua

Two Shenzhen-listed makers of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Shijiazhuang Yiling Pharmaceutical and Tianjin Chase Sun Pharmaceutical, have reaped stunning gains this year, riding on endorsements by the public face of China’s successful fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

Yiling reported a 57 per cent jump in net profit to 714 million yuan (US$106 million) for the first half of 2020, while its stock price surged by as much as 245 per cent between January and mid April, hitting its highest level since it went public in 2011. Chase Sun recorded 2.8 billion yuan in revenue for the first half, a 22 per cent increase compared with the same period last year.

Their fortunes came even as growth in the overall TCM industry stalled, with only 17 out of 68 TCM makers listed in China recording year-on-year growth in revenue in the first half of 2020, according to companies’ earnings reports.

Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China.

Behind Yiling and Chase Sun’s success is their close association with Zhong Nanshan, a top mainland Chinese medical expert famous for leading the country’s coronavirus containment efforts. A pulmonologist who has also studied in the UK, Zhong is a supporter of TCM and has frequently recommended the use of traditional remedies for treating coronavirus patients.

Yiling was founded in 1992 by TCM practitioner Wu Yiling, who is famous for developing a concoction of leech, whole scorpion, centipede, soil beetle and cicada slough used to treat cardiovascular diseases.



Zhong Nanshan wearing a suit and tie: A pulmonologist who has also studied in the UK, Zhong Nanshan is a supporter of TCM. Photo: Handout


© Provided by South China Morning Post
A pulmonologist who has also studied in the UK, Zhong Nanshan is a supporter of TCM. Photo: Handout

Both Wu and Zhong are academicians at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, the highest academic title conferred by Beijing to engineers and scientists, and have collaborated since at least 2015, when Wu invited Zhong to join a 460 million yuan research lab set up for academicians by his company. In 2016, they co-founded a research centre to tackle lung diseases using TCM in the southern city of Guangzhou.

While his collaboration with Yiling is focused on research, Zhong’s association with Chase Sun has more to do with business. In April 2012, a Guangzhou-based medical foundation led by Zhong invested 3.5 million yuan in a pharmaceutical company along with Chase Sun, which invested 5 million, according to Tianyancha, a public database of business records.

Zhong has since sat on the board of the company along with Yao Xiaoqing, Chase Sun’s chairman. Founded in 1996, Chase Sun transferred a controlling stake in 2019 to the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of Chengdu, and has become a state-owned company affiliated with the city in Southwest China.

Zhong, Yiling and Chase Sun did not reply

Asia Today: Australian state warns non-complying public | St. Louis business news

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The premier of Australia’s Victoria state is stepping up his fight with members of the public who don’t comply with pandemic regulations, saying close contacts of those infected who refuse a test will have to spend 21 days in quarantine.

The state government has announced mandatory quarantine will be extended by 10 days for close contacts if they decide not to be tested on the 11th day of isolation. The change will come into effect at midnight Sunday.

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said a “very, very high percentage” of people had submitted to testing but the rule was designed to provide authorities with an even more complete picture.

“This is just double-checking, triple-checking that you haven’t, in fact, still got the virus,” he said.

Victoria reported one more death and 12 new cases on Sunday, ending a three-day stretch without a fatality. The figures take Victoria’s death count from the virus to 810 and the national toll to 898.

Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Trump hosts first public event since COVID-19 diagnosis, says virus will ‘disappear’ with ‘science, medicine’

President Trump hosted a gathering with reportedly somewhere between 300 and 400 people in attendance on Saturday on the South Lawn of the White House, marking his first public event since he was hospitalized after contracting COVID-19 last week. It’s been just two weeks since a crowd gathered in the Rose Garden for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination, which experts believe may have been the catalyst for a coronavirus outbreak that affected both the Trump administration and Republican senators.

Trump was scheduled to speak Saturday for about 30 minutes, but wound up only utilizing 18, an unusual instance of efficiency for the president, who is known for going on tangents that go far beyond the scope of his planned marks. His voice reportedly sounded “a touch hoarse,” but he showed no outward signs of illness and said he was “feeling great,” The Associated Press reports.

During his speech, Trump said the coronavirus “is going to disappear” largely thanks “science, medicine,” and “the American spirit.” That’s a familiar line for the president, although this time the optimism appeared based in his belief that newly-developed therapies, rather than wishful thinking, would lead the charge.

The event was not billed as a campaign rally, but the president’s rhetoric suggested otherwise. Read more at Axios.

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Trump says he wants to hold a rally on Saturday after his doctor cleared him to resume public events.

President Trump’s doctor said on Thursday that the president had completed his treatments to alleviate the symptoms of the coronavirus and that he anticipated Mr. Trump would be able to resume “public engagements” on Saturday.

The forecast about Mr. Trump’s condition came from the White House physician, Dr. Sean Conley, in a note updating people on his health.

As of Friday morning, it has been one week since Mr. Trump announced that he had tested positive for the virus, though neither he nor White House officials have disclosed when he last tested negative before that announcement.

Thursday night, the president called in to Sean Hannity’s show on Fox News and said he wanted to hold a rally in Florida on Saturday and another in Pennsylvania on Sunday. He went on to say he was in “great shape” — even as he paused on a few occasions and seemed to cough or clear his throat — and again presented the monoclonal antibody treatment he received as a miracle cure, even though there is no final clinical trial data to evaluate its effectiveness.

Mr. Trump did not give a clear answer when Mr. Hannity asked if he had tested negative for the coronavirus: He first said he wouldn’t get an “actual test” until Friday — today — then suggested that he had already had a test and that it had found “very little infection or virus, if any,” and then said: “I don’t know if they found any. I didn’t go into it greatly with the doctors.”

In the note on Thursday, Dr. Conley said Mr. Trump had remained “stable” and “devoid” of symptoms that would suggest the illness was progressing.

“Saturday will be Day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the president’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” Dr. Conley said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say those who test positive for the coronavirus should isolate themselves from others for a minimum of 10 days after testing positive, or for at least 10 days after symptoms first appear. Some people with a moderate or severe case of the virus can stay infectious for 20 days or perhaps even longer, according to the C.D.C.

Shortly after Dr. Conley’s memo, Mr. Trump’s re-election campaign released a statement calling for the second presidential debate to take place as originally scheduled. “There is therefore no medical reason why the Commission on Presidential Debates should shift the debate to a virtual setting, postpone it or otherwise alter it in any way,” the statement said.

On the Fox News show, Mr. Hannity suggested that Mr. Trump should organize his own debate.

“Well, I might,” Mr. Trump said, adding that he would want a “fair anchor” — perhaps, he said, Sean Hannity.

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Montgomery County Public Health District urges flu shots during COVID-19 pandemic

The Montgomery County Public Health District is urging residents to get vaccinated for the flu and is currently taking appointments for children with adult bookings coming soon.

“This year, it’s even more important with COVID because the signs and symptoms of COVID are very similar to that of the flu,” said Alicia Williams, MCPHD’s public health director.

Looming over this flu season is the possibility of there being a confluence with COVID-19. And that can happen, Williams said as she pointed to a full hospital capacity due to COVID-19 in July.

“We don’t want to have that situation if we can prevent it. And getting a flu shot is one way we can prevent it,” she said, signaling a strain on supplies, nurse and space capacity brought on by flu hospitalizations.

As of Thursday, there are 61 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the county, including 18 in ICU, according to the Montgomery County Hospital District.


“Getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever during 2020-2021 to protect yourself and the people around you from flu, and to help reduce the strain on healthcare systems responding to the COVID-19 pandemic,” reads a statement on the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

MCHPD is booking appointments for free vaccines for children 6 months to 18 who are either uninsured, have Medicaid, or lack coverage. Vaccinations for children without insurance are being billed at $10, with waivers available for those who cannot pay.

Unlike in years past, this year, MCHPD is vaccinating adults who are privately insured and with comorbidities or are part of a high-risk group like the elderly. Those who do not qualify can pay the $10 fee with available waivers.

The vaccine includes the four most common and prevalent flu strains and is applied through injection. Williams explained taking the vaccination during the fall is most effective because that is right ahead of the peak season, usually at the end of the year.

Aside from the danger of a contagion intensified by COVID-19, Williams wants to remind people the flu can cost them work productivity, wages and school time. A vaccine, she continued, could avoid that.

Furnished by the State of Texas, there is currently no shortage of vaccines, according to Williams.

If people do not get vaccinated through MCPHD, Williams is still encouraging the general public to get a vaccine at pharmacy chains offering it. She also wants people to understand the mild aching and fever they may experience from the vaccine does not mean they have the flu, but rather that their immune system is activating antibiotics.

And to that effect, MCHD paramedics were vaccinated last week. Additionally, MCHD will be carrying out flu shots on Meals on Wheels recipients.

“Ideally (mask usage) would reduce the spread of COVID, but it would also reduce the spread of flu,” she said, while also highlighting the importance of social distancing. “Our goal here is prevention, and that’s across the board for public health. One way we can do