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Scrubs brand FIGS comes under fire for ‘insensitive’ ad featuring female physician

FIGS, a medical apparel company known for its fashionable scrubs, has come under fire for an “insensitive” video that portrayed female doctors of osteopathic medicine as “dummies.”



a person holding a sign: A medical worker walks past a sign that reads "Express Care."


© Spencer Platt/Getty Images, File
A medical worker walks past a sign that reads “Express Care.”

In the marketing materials, a woman wearing a set of pink scrubs and a name tag with the abbreviation DO, for doctor of osteopathic medicine, is holding a “Medical Terminology for Dummies” book upside down. Many in the medical community criticized the since-removed ad as misogynistic and disrespectful toward female physicians and DOs.

“We are outraged that in 2020, women physicians and doctors of osteopathic medicine are still attacked in thoughtless and ignorant marketing campaigns,” the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine said in a statement. “A company like FIGS that asks us to spend money on its product should be ashamed for promoting these stereotypes. We demand the respect we’ve earned AND a public apology.”

The organization Physicians for Patient Protection said it was “dismayed” by the Los Angeles-based company’s marketing.

“Our DO colleagues are highly trained physicians, many of whom hold leadership positions in academia and have authored medical texts themselves,” the organization said in a statement to ABC News. “Many of our DO colleagues are also women. And they may wear pink scrubs, but they’ve never needed to read any textbook made ‘for dummies.'”

MORE: Trump attacks Fauci with falsehoods after backlash for quoting him out of context in campaign ad

FIGS apologized for the video on Tuesday, saying it had “dropped the ball.”

“A lot of you guys have pointed out an insensitive video we had on our site — we are incredibly sorry for any hurt this has caused you, especially our female DOs (who are amazing!),” the company tweeted Tuesday. “FIGS is a female-founded company whose only mission is to make you guys feel awesome.”

Dr. Stephanie Markle, DO, MPH, an ICU doctor and surgeon in Kalamazoo, Michigan, told ABC News that the “blatantly misogynistic” ad has angered many in the medical community. Markle said the ad is particularly harmful as someone who experiences sexism and has to “constantly validate” herself as a female physician.

“I have to explain to people multiple times: I’m not the nurse, I’m not the dietitian, I’m not the janitor,” she said.

Female doctors also tend to make less than men, she noted. Male primary care physicians make about 25% more than their female counterparts, according to Medscape. Among specialists, they make 31% more, it found.

“The sexism is still so prevalent that this was such a slap to the face,” Markle said.

MORE: NY doctors were at the center of COVID battle. Here’s what they say about the fall.

DOs are fully licensed physicians who take a more holistic approach to medicine, compared to medical doctors. Dr. Miranda Rosenberg, MD, a resident in the ABC News Medical Unit, said the ad was particularly insensitive “especially after so many doctors have sacrificed so much

Trump Holds Florida Rally After White House Physician Reports Negative COVID-19 Tests

On Monday, White House physician Sean Conley said that President Trump had registered consecutive days in which he’s tested negative for COVID-19. The news came on the same date that Trump headed to a packed campaign rally in Sanford, Florida. 

“In response to your inquiry regarding the President’s most recent COVID-19 tests, I can share with you that he has tested NEGATIVE, on consecutive days, using the Abbott BinaxNOW antigen card,” said Conley. He added that those tests occurred “in context with additional clinical and laboratory data.”

Speaking of this data, Conley wrote that it was made up of “viral load, subgenomic RNA and PCR cycle threshold measurements, as well as ongoing assessment of viral culture data.”

The letter concluded that the president is “not infectious to others,” which echoes a similar message that Conley issued on Saturday. He also stated, on Saturday, that the president is cleared for an “active schedule.” 

CNN adds that it’s not clear what consecutive days Trump tested positive, while also noting that the Abbott BinaxNOW test he reportedly took may lack precision, as it’s only proven accurate in people being tested within the first week of their symptoms starting to show. The FDA has also said they’re not certain of how accurate Abbott BinaxNOW results are. 

Trump’s positive test was first announced on Thursday, October 1. The White House has not said when the president last tested negative prior to that announcement. 

As for that aforementioned rally, a large crowd gathered for the event. The campaign was issuing temperature checks and distributed masks/hand sanitizer, but social distancing remained absent. 

Trump also claimed to be “immune” and offered to kiss anyone in the crowd daring enough to chance it:

On a related note, this all comes on the same day that Dr. Anthony Fauci said that holding large rallies “was asking for trouble” due to the virus’s surge in several states. 

“We know that that is asking for trouble when you do that,” Fauci said of Trump’s decision to re-up a full campaign rallying schedule, according to The New York Times. “We’ve seen that when you have situations of congregate settings where there are

Trump has met CDC criteria to end isolation and is cleared to return to an active schedule by his physician

President Donald Trump has been cleared to return to an active schedule, according to a new memo from his physician, Dr. Sean Conley, released Saturday night.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his face mask to speak from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Alex Brandon/AP
President Donald Trump removes his face mask to speak from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The memo says Trump has met criteria from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to end isolation but does not say Trump has received a negative coronavirus test since first testing positive for the virus last week. However, that is not a criteria for clearing isolation, according to the CDC.

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” the memo from Conley reads in part.

Conley wrote that Trump is 10 days from the onset of symptoms, has been fever-free for “well over 24 hours” and after diagnostic tests, “there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus.”

Conley did not fully explain what “advanced diagnostic tests” the President had received. For example, he did not disclose whether so-called viral culture was performed — the process by which scientists try to infect living cells to see whether active virus is present.

The latest disclosure from Conley comes as Trump prepares to return to the campaign trail after being sidelined amid his fight with the virus. It’s likely to raise additional questions about the health of the President as officials continue to provide carefully worded statements as the campaign enters its final stretch.

Trump on Saturday held his first public event since his diagnosis, delivering a highly political speech to a crowd of supporters packed on the White House’s South Lawn. He is currently scheduled to hold at least three in-person rallies this upcoming week, beginning Monday in Florida. Conley says he will continue to monitor Trump “as he returns to an active schedule.”

Officials — including Conley — still haven’t disclosed when the President last tested negative before his positive test last week, which would offer insight into when he was contagious and how much so.

Trump, who left the hospital earlier this week after receiving treatment for the virus, credited his quick recovery to his rapid treatment during an interview with Fox News on Friday.

“I think the secret for me was I got there very early,” he told the network’s medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel.

Trump had received an immediate dose of an experimental monoclonal antibody therapy at the White House, then was treated with a course of the infused antiviral medication remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone during his hospital stay. He had also been given supplemental oxygen, Conley previously said.

This story has been updated with additional background information and context.

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New York Health Welcomes Internal Medicine Physician Robin DaCosta, MD

Press release content from PR.com. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

Excited to be a part of NY Health, Dr. DaCosta believes that “Medicine is challenging but finding new ways to restore health in our community is so rewarding.”

Excited to be a part of NY Health, Dr. DaCosta believes that “Medicine is challenging but finding new ways to restore health in our community is so rewarding.”

Ronkonkoma, NY, October 08, 2020 –( PR.com )– New York Health is proud to announce the addition of board-certified Robin DaCosta, MD to its team of internal medicine physicians. Dr. DaCosta will be practicing at 217 Portion Road, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779.

Since 2004, she has worked as an Internal Medicine physician on Long Island where she has enjoyed being able to treat the same patients and their families for nearly two decades.

New York Health Welcomes Internal Medicine Physician Robin DaCosta, MD

“I see my patients as an extension of my family. My focus is not only on treating a current illness but to lend support and most importantly to try and prevent illness from ever occurring,” Dr. DaCosta said.

Prior to joining NY Health, Dr. DaCosta practiced at Island Medical Care. Her medical career has taken her to rural Kentucky, providing medical care in a physician shortage area. She has also practiced in Tennessee before returning back to Long Island. After 9/11, she had the privilege to participate in the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring Program where she evaluated and treated those who heroically worked at the World Trade Center site.

Excited to be a part of NY Health, Dr. DaCosta believes that “Medicine is challenging but finding new ways to restore health in our community is so rewarding.”

Dr. DaCosta is a Long Island native who attended Stony Brook University where she received a Bachelor of Science in Biology. In 1989, she graduated with her Doctor of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine. She then completed her Internal Medicine Internship and Residency at Stony Brook University.

To make an appointment with Dr. DaCosta, please call 631-758-7003. For more information, please visit www.nyhealth.com.

About New York Health

At New York Health we provide highly professional, sensitive, and personalized care. All of our patients become part of the NY Health family and we will continuously strive to achieve our main goal. Deliver the best medical care possible with your well-being in mind.

Contact Information:

New York Health

Sarah Gould

631-574-8360

Contact via Email

New York Health Welcomes Internal Medicine Physician Robin DaCosta, MD

Read the full story here: New York Health Welcomes Internal Medicine Physician Robin DaCosta, MD

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Trump’s Physician Says He Is ‘Safe’ to Begin ‘Public Engagements’ on Saturday

The president is saying that he feels “great.” He is saying that the heavy steroid he is on is “not a heavy steroid.” He is saying lucid things on the White House lawn, like: “We’re taking care of our seniors, you’re not vulnerable, but they like to say ‘the vulnerable,’ but you’re the least vulnerable, but for this one thing you are vulnerable.”



a man standing in front of a cloudy blue sky: Getty Images


© Getty Images
Getty Images

On Thursday night, President Trump’s physician agreed with the gist of his recent comments on his own health. In a memo, Dr. Sean Conley stated that “based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements by Saturday,” which will have been 10 days since his positive coronavirus test was announced.

A bounty of questions remain. On Thursday, in the same interview in which he told Fox Business Network that the parents of soldiers killed in action may have given him COVID-19, he said that he would be taking dexamethasone for a “little bit longer.” How will Trump feel once he’s off a steroid that is known for giving patients boosts of energy and bouts of euphoria? Will Americans without the benefit of his taxpayer-subsidized health-care gain access to Regeneron, a drug Trump has called a “cure” — and a drug that was developed using tests on fetal tissue derived from abortion, a process that the Trump administration suspended federal funding for in June 2019. Will the White House actually take its pandemic precautions seriously now that around three dozen patients have been infected during its outbreak? Most importantly, will Trump be testing negatively by the weekend? Dr. Conley’s letter notably does not address whether or not the president is still testing positive. Judging from the administration’s opacity during the crisis so far, most of these questions will remain unanswered.

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As Trump waits to break his entirely porous quarantine, he is keeping busy.

On Thursday, he spent an hour on the phone with Fox Business and is expected to call into Hannity at 9 p.m. On Friday, the president — having cleared his workload, apparently — will guest-host Rush Limbaugh’s three-hour radio show.

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White House physician says Trump reporting ‘no symptoms’ of COVID-19

White House physician Sean Conley said Tuesday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpState Department revokes visa of Giuliani-linked Ukrainian ally: report White House Gift Shop selling ‘Trump Defeats COVID’ commemorative coin Biden says he should not have called Trump a clown in first debate MORE is reporting “no symptoms” after being discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center during his treatment for the novel coronavirus.

“This morning the President’s team of physicians met with him in the Residence. He had a restful first night at home, and today he reports no symptoms,” Conley wrote in a memorandum issued Tuesday afternoon, less than five days after Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19.

“Vital signs and physical exam remain stable, with an ambulatory oxygen saturation level of 95-97%. Overall he continues to do extremely well, I will provide updates as we know more,” Conley wrote.

Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Thursday evening and was transported to Walter Reed on Friday after experiencing a high fever and a drop in his oxygen level that required supplemental oxygen.

Trump has been fever-free since Friday, according to Conley, and otherwise has experienced symptoms of a mild cough, nasal congestion and fatigue.

Conley, who briefed reporters three times over the past three days, consistently described Trump’s symptoms as improving. It is unclear whether Conley, who has evaded some questions about the president’s care and the timeline of his infection, will similarly brief reporters at some point Tuesday on the president’s condition. White House aides have also indicated that Trump could make a public appearance of some kind.

Trump has been treated with an experimental antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron, the antiviral medication remdesivir, and dexamethasone, a steroid used to treat inflammation. Trump was expected to receive his fifth and final dose of remdesivir on Tuesday and will continue to receive dexamethasone.

Conley said Monday that Trump had met or exceeded criteria to be discharged from Walter Reed, though he acknowledged that the president may not be “out of the woods” and said he would be looking for Trump’s condition to remain the same or improve over the coming week.

Trump has been eager to return to normal work at the White House and on Monday released a video urging Americans not to fear the coronavirus or allow it to “dominate” their lives, touting the therapies available in the United States to combat the disease.

He has also indicated he wants to take part in the presidential debate scheduled for next week.

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Women In Longevity Medicine And The Rise Of The Longevity Physician

Over the past decade, we witnessed unprecedented advances in the field of biogerontology, and the massive convergence of biotechnology, information technology, AI, and medicine. And now we are witnessing the birth of a new field of longevity medicine, which integrates the latest advances in many of these fields of science and technology. My definition longevity medicine is advanced personalized preventative medicine powered by deep biomarkers of aging and longevity.

And, like in the field of AI for drug discovery, women are at the forefront of this revolution and there were precedents when we had to look for a male physician to make a conference panel more diverse. 

One of the physician-scientists who stands out in this area is Dr. Evelyne Yehudit Bischof. I first got a note with a request for more information on one of our research papers from Dr. Bischof on December 30th, 2019 while in Shanghai. A request I almost ignored due to the heavy workload but accidentally I looked at her profile which was highly unusual. In brief, Evelyne is a German medical doctor with an MD from Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biology and Genetics, who interned at Columbia University, and Harvard MGH and Beth Israel Medical Deaconess, attending physician at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland, and associate professor at Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences.  She fluently spoke six languages including German, Russian, and Mandarin Chinese, which was quite impressive. The second time we met was at Human Longevity Inc, in San Diego when she was interviewing with one of the most influential entrepreneurs and investors in longevity biotechnology, Dr. Wei-Wu He to join HLI as a longevity physician.

The longevity industry is rapidly emerging and longevity clinics are being set up in various parts of the world. So I decided to ask Eva a few questions to elucidate this new and emerging industry. 

Alex: Eva, we know each other for almost a year and you do not fail to impress with your academic publications, public lectures, and clinical work. You are as close to the “longevity physician” as it can possibly get. Can you tell us a bit more about yourself and about the work that you are doing on the clinical side and on the research side? 

Dr. Evelyne Bischof: Thank you, Alex – it is an honor to be so generously introduced by a true innovator, scientist and entrepreneur, as well as a longevity KOL and allow me to revert the compliment. I am a rather globally oriented internal medicine specialist, with training and work experience in Germany, USA, Switzerland and China. For almost a decade now, I have been splitting my time between Shanghai and Basel, creating a path that allowed me to conclude my residency and fellowship, develop translational and clinical research niches and collaborators, as well as to engage actively in academic medical education. While

White House physician sows confusion with briefings

With President Donald Trump battling coronavirus at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, White House doctor Sean Conley has come under fire for making confusing and misleading comments — including one he later walked back — about the President’s condition.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)


© Susan Walsh/AP
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

After Saturday’s televised briefing at Walter Reed, a White House official offered a more alarming assessment of Trump’s health to reporters. That reporting was initially given to a pool of reporters attributed to an official familiar with the President’s condition. Later, the Associated Press and the New York Times identified that official as White House chief of staff Mark Meadows.

Conley claimed at Sunday’s briefing that Meadows’ widely reported statement contradicting him was “misconstrued.”

“The chief and I work side by side,” Conley said. “And I think his statement was misconstrued. What he meant was that 24 hours ago, when he and I were checking on the President, that there was that momentary episode of the high fever and that temporary drop in the saturation, which prompted us to act expediently to move him up here.”

Conley added, “Fortunately, that was really a very transient limited episode, a couple hours later he was back up. Mild again. You know, we, I’m not going to speculate what that limited episode was about so early in the course but he’s doing well.”

Video: Doctor releases letter on Trump’s condition (CNN)

Doctor releases letter on Trump’s condition

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Conley on Sunday also defended the decision to not disclose that the President was administered oxygen by saying he wanted to “reflect the upbeat attitude of the team.”

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the President, his course of illness has had. I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so it came off that we were trying to hide something,” Conley said, adding that “wasn’t necessarily true.”

“The fact of the matter is he’s doing very well,” Conley went on.

Conley, who took over as Trump’s White House physician in March 2018, holds a degree in osteopathic medicine, one of the two degrees in the United States in which physicians can practice medicine — either as a doctor of medicine or a doctor of osteopathic medicine. About a quarter of US medical students train at osteopathic medical schools, according to the American Medical Association. Historically, doctor of osteopathic medicine programs have touted their methods as “more holistic.”

After receiving his bachelor’s degree from University of Notre Dame, Conley graduated from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2006, according to his LinkedIn profile. He then served in various military posts, primarily at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth. He was the senior medical officer at

What to Know About Sean Conley, the White House Physician

As President Trump remains hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for the coronavirus, one doctor is at the center of his treatment: Sean P. Conley, the White House physician.

Stepping out of the hospital with a team of doctors behind him on Saturday, Dr. Conley gave an optimistic update on Mr. Trump’s condition at a news conference. He said the president was “doing very well” and in “exceptionally good spirits” after spending Friday night at the hospital.

The news conference put a national spotlight on Dr. Conley, who offered a distinctly different outlook from what Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, told reporters later.

Here’s what we know about Dr. Conley.

Dr. Conley took on the role of White House physician in 2018 after Dr. Ronny L. Jackson was nominated to be secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. Jackson had to withdraw his name from consideration for that post amid accusations of inappropriate workplace behavior and was subsequently promoted by Mr. Trump to the position of assistant to the president and chief White House medical adviser. He is now running for a House seat in Texas.

In March 2018, Dr. Conley was named acting White House physician, and he was officially appointed to the position by Mr. Trump in May 2018.

Dr. Conley graduated from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2006, according to records from the Virginia Board of Medicine. Doctors of osteopathic medicine tend to emphasize community medicine and preventive care, take a more holistic approach to medicine and rely heavily on physical diagnosis compared with traditional doctors of medicine.

Dr. Conley, who received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Notre Dame, has served as an emergency doctor for the U.S. Navy since 2006.

A native of Pennsylvania, Dr. Conley completed his residency at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., in 2013. After his residency, Dr. Conley served as chief of trauma for the NATO Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit in Afghanistan.

He served as director of the medical center’s Combat Trauma Research Group for a little over two years.

In May, Dr. Conley gained attention after revealing that Mr. Trump had started taking hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malaria drug, while under his care.

Many experts have questioned the drug’s effectiveness in treating, preventing or curing Covid-19 despite claims from Mr. Trump.

The Food and Drug Administration warned in April that it should be used only in clinical trials or in hospitals. The agency also said the drug could cause dangerous heart rhythm problems.

In a letter in May discussing Mr. Trump’s use of hydroxychloroquine, Dr. Conley said he and the president had “concluded the potential benefit from treatment outweighed the relative risks.”

At the news conference on Saturday, Dr. Conley told reporters that Mr. Trump was not taking hydroxychloroquine.

“We discussed it,” Dr. Conley said. “He

Here’s What Trump’s Physician Said About the President’s Condition Following His COVID Diagnosis

From Men’s Health

President Donald Trump is “doing very well” after his first night at Walter Reed Medical Center, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said Saturday in a press conference. Dr. Conley was flanked by other members of the president’s medical team, who briefed the press on the president’s condition and revealed new details about the timeline of his diagnosis and treatment.

The president has been fever-free for 24 hours and has normal organ function, according to the doctors. Trump will be on a five-day course of the experimental antiviral therapy remdesivir. Reporters repeatedly pressed Dr. Conley on whether Trump has received supplemental oxygen at Walter Reed. Dr. Conley said Trump is not currently on supplemental oxygen, but would not confirm whether the president has needed it so far.

Conley also shared that the president asked about hydroxychloroquine—a drug Trump has championed despite there being little evidence it can treat the coronavirus—but his medical team has not prescribed it.

Conley said Trump was “just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” which could mean he was diagnosed as early as Wednesday. The president traveled to New Jersey on Thursday for a campaign fundraiser and revealed at 1 a.m. on Friday that he and his wife, First Lady Melania Trump, were diagnosed only after reports emerged that close aide Hope Hicks had tested positive for coronavirus. On Friday, the White House issued a statement that the president was experiencing “mild symptoms” of the virus and would be transported via helicopter to Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. When asked why the decision was made to transfer Trump to Walter Reed, Conley said, “Because he’s the President of the United States.”

Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men’s Health

Trump falls into a high-risk category for COVID-19 given that he’s male, 74 years old, and clinically obese. The disease has so far killed over 200,000 Americans and more than one million people worldwide.

Several Republican lawmakers and members of the Trump administration announced positive coronavirus diagnoses on Saturday. Sens. Mike Lee of Utah, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, the president of the University of Notre Dame Rev. John Jenkins, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, and Republican National Committee chair Ronna McDaniel all have announced they have tested positive for COVID-19. This wave of new diagnoses comes a week after more than 100 people gathered—most without masks—in the White House Rose Garden to celebrate Trump’s third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett. An indoor reception followed the outdoor ceremony.

On Friday, Vice President Mike Pence and Second Lady Karen Pence, as well as former Vice President and current Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, tested negative for the virus.

This is a developing situation. This story will be updated as new details become available.

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