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More Than 15 Percent Of Ohio Kids Considered Obese: Study

CLEVELAND — More than 15 percent of Ohio children are considered obese.

Ohio has one of the highest obesity rates in the nation for children ages 10 to 17, according to a new study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Roughly one in seven Ohio kids are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” said Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation .

Ohio’s obesity rate for kids 10 to 17 is 15.7 percent. The national obesity rate for that age group is 15.5 percent. Ohio has the 20th highest youth obesity rate in the nation.

Poverty is one of the leading contributing factors to youth obesity, the Foundation found. With the coronavirus pandemic causing shutdowns and mass layoffs around the nation, Ohio and the U.S.’s youth obesity crisis may have grown worse.

“The COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors we know contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities. We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States,” Bussel said.

Obesity rates tend to also reveal racial, ethnic and economic disparities. Black, Hispanic and Native American children have higher obesity rates than white or Asian children, the Foundation said.

“We’ve seen these disparities for decades when it comes to childhood obesity rates,” Bussel said. “This year, we’ve also seen people of color and people with low incomes hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. In both cases these outcomes reflect decades of disinvestment in specific communities and specific groups of people, often driven by the systemic racism and discrimination that are still so prevalent in our society.”

To counteract escalating obesity rates, the Foundation recommended the federal government increase SNAP’s maximum benefit level and expand waivers allowing school districts to feed students and the community.

The data on Ohio’s youth obesity rate is included in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s new report, “State of Childhood Obesity: Prioritizing Children’s Health During the Pandemic.”

The report uses data from the 2018-2019 National Survey of Children’s Health and an analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

This article originally appeared on the Across Ohio Patch

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CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta puts Trump’s odds of surviving COVID-19 at ‘greater than 90 percent’

President Trump tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night, and “obviously, given the president’s age and his pre-existing illnesses, he’s going to be at increased risk from this disease,” CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta said on Friday morning’s New Day. “Still, the odds are very much in his favor … greater than 90 percent, 95 percent chance that he will get through this.”

We know that his age, 244 pounds of weight, heart disease, and cholesterol level put Trump at higher risk, Gupta said. “When you’re at his age, 65 to 74, it’s about a five times greater likelihood that somebody will be hospitalized for this, as compared to somebody younger.” But we don’t know lots of other important information, he added, like whether he has symptoms or when he was infected, and “we still don’t have full vision on his past medical history,” including the story behind “that strange visit to Walter Reed back in November.”

Either way, Trump now has to isolate — not quarantine, isolate — for up to 14 days now, Gupta advised. and everyone he’s been in contact with will “need to be quarantined, not just tested.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson “kept on working for several days and then it got worse over time,” George Stephanopoulos said on Friday’s Good Morning America. ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton said Trump will likely avoid the worst but not get off scot free: “About 80 percent of people infected with COVID-19 do not require hospitalization. That doesn’t mean, though, that their disease course will be mild. It just means that they can be managed in a home environment. And we also know that 45 percent of those infected — up to 45 percent — will show no symptoms.”

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Approximately 40 percent of babies born with sickle cell disease in Texas are in Houston

There are about 180 babies born with sickle cell disease in Texas each year, and approximately 40 percent (70 children) are born in Houston.

The Houston Health Department said in a press release that of the estimated 100,000 Americans living with the condition, approximately 7,000 are Texans, and Houston has more diagnoses than in any other region.

Sickle cell disease is a rare genetic blood condition that ultimately causes organ damage, including severe episodes of pain that can last up to a week and can result in multiple hospitalizations throughout a lifetime.

Kennedy Cooper is one of the estimated 1,500 children in Houston living with the disease. In a blog post for Texas Children’s Hospital, Cooper shared her journey, recalling moments where she felt ashamed to take medicine in front of friends and had to miss out on activities she loves because of her condition.

COVID IN PEOPLE OF COLOR: Texas’ tallying method further confirms that COVID-19 is deadlier for Black and Hispanic people


“It’s not really fun to take medicine in front of friends at sleepovers,” she shared. “I’ve tried countless techniques to avoid this, including sneaking my medicine bag into the bathroom while others were distracted or waiting until everyone was sleeping to take my medicine. I’ve also had to turn down invitations to countless pool parties because the pool temperature was usually never warm enough for me.”

She’s able to shrug if off most of the time, “but sometimes you just can’t help but notice how different you are from everybody else,” she said.

Dr. Titilope Fasipe, chair of the Houston Sickle Cell Collaborative, is also a sickle cell patient. She was diagnosed at age 1, and wants every child to know that they can still lead a long, fulfilling life.

“I’m one of the ones who made it to adulthood and I’m happy, but I’m also respectful of the fact that so many more did not, and that’s part of what pushes me at times,” she said, as reported by KPRC Click2Houston’s Haley Hernandez.

Fasipe said we need more research and treatments for “this devastating disease that affects so many people in our community.”

If you want to learn more about the disease, the sickle cell collaborative and health department will host their 2020 Sickle Cell Advocacy Summit on October 8.

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Coronavirus cases among young adults jumped by more than 50 percent in August nationally, the CDC says

New research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says coronavirus infections among young adults increased significantly from August to September as colleges and universities reopened around the country. 

The CDC study released Tuesday found that between Aug. 2 and Sept. 5, weekly COVID-19 cases among adults aged 18-22 increased 55 percent nationally. 


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The Northeast region experienced a 144 percent increase in coronavirus cases among young adults, while the Midwest recorded a 123.4 percent increase, according to the report. 

The health agency emphasized that the jump in cases was not solely attributable to increased testing. 

As about 45 percent of young adults in the age range are enrolled in colleges and universities, the CDC said it is likely the resumption of in-person classes is part of the reason for the rise in cases. 

The CDC notes previous reports showed young adults are less likely than any other age group to adhere to health guidance meant to curb the spread of the coronavirus. 

While young adults are at lower risk for severe disease and death if they contract the virus compared to older adults and those with preexisting conditions, they can certainly transmit the virus to those at higher risk and can also become seriously ill themselves. 

“Young adults, including those enrolled in colleges and universities, should take precautions, including mask wearing, social distancing, and hand hygiene, and follow local, state, and federal guidance for minimizing the spread of COVID-19,” the CDC said in its report. 

“Institutions of higher education should take action to promote healthy environments,” the agency said. 

In a separate study published by the CDC on Tuesday, researchers looked at an unnamed North Carolina university that experienced a rapid increase in COVID-19 cases and clusters within two weeks of opening the campus to students, forcing the school to transition to online classes. 

Between August 3 and 25, nearly 700 coronavirus cases were identified and most cases occurred in people aged 22 or younger. 

“Student gatherings and congregate living settings, both on and off-campus, likely contributed to the rapid spread of COVID-19 within the university community,” researchers wrote in the report. 


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