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The Wanted’s Tom Parker diagnosed with ‘terminal’ brain cancer

Parker has been diagnosed with stage four glioblastoma.

Tom Parker of The Wanted is facing a devastating medical diagnosis.

Parker, who was part of the British-Irish boy band most popular for its song “Glad You Came,” shared on Instagram that he’s been diagnosed with a brain tumor and has begun treatment.

In an interview with OK! magazine, Parker clarified that the disease is stage four glioblastoma.

“We are all absolutely devastated but we are gonna fight this all the way. We don’t want your sadness, we just want love and positivity and together we will raise awareness of this terrible disease and look for all available treatment options,” he wrote in an Instagram caption. “It’s gonna be a tough battle but with everyone’s love and support we are going to beat this.”

Parker, 32, told OK! that he’d been suffering seizures and was shocked to learn of his diagnosis. Glioblastoma is rare and experts have said that it is among the deadliest type of brain cancers. It affects an estimated 13,000 people in the United States every year and there is no cure. Senators John McCain and Ted Kennedy were both diagnosed with and ultimately died from the disease.

“They’ve said it’s terminal,” Parker said of his prognosis. “It was a lot to deal with by myself. I still haven’t processed it.”

The singer said that he will undergo radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment as he and his wife Kelsey await the birth of their second child. They are parents to a 15-month-old daughter.

“I don’t think Tom will ever process this information. It’s horrendous,” his wife told OK!. “Watching your partner go through this is so hard, because how can I tell him not to let it consume him?”

ABC News’ Hayley FitzPatrick contributed to this report.

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The Wanted’s Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

Tom Parker, a member of the popular U.K. boy band The Wanted, has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. In an interview with OK! magazine, the 32-year-old opened up about being diagnosed with stage 4 glioblastoma. 



Tom Parker et al. posing for the camera: parker.jpg


© Tom Parker
parker.jpg

Parker said he found out about his tumor six weeks ago, and that he is “still in shock.” 

“I knew something wasn’t right, but I never expected it to be this,” he told the magazine. The singer suffered a seizure in July and was put on a waiting list for an MRI, according to BBC News. He was later rushed to the hospital after suffering another seizure, and after three days of tests he was diagnosed with the brain tumor.

Because of coronavirus restrictions, Parker’s wife, actress Kelsey Hardwick, was not allowed to be with him in the hospital during his tests. Hardwick is pregnant with the couple’s second child. They are already parents to 16-month-old Aurelia.

“There’s no easy way to say this but I’ve sadly been diagnosed with a Brain Tumour and I’m already undergoing treatment,” Parker disclosed in an Instagram post. “We are all absolutely devastated but we are gonna fight this all the way. We don’t want your sadness, we just want love and positivity and together we will raise awareness of this terrible disease and look for all available treatment options.”

Why is the cancer that killed John McCain so deadly?

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In the OK! magazine interview, Parker said he was determined to remain positive. “I’m going to be here,” he said. “I’m going to fight this.”

Glioblastoma is a deadly brain cancer and one of the most aggressive cancers in adults. It’s the same type of cancer Senator John McCain was diagnosed with in 2017, and later died from. At the time of McCain’s diagnosis, CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook explained the severity.

“The problem with glioblastoma is at the time that it is discovered, there are almost always microscopic cells that have spread elsewhere in the brain because it spreads along the nerve cells,” LaPook said on CBSN’s “Red & Blue.” 

“Despite all the research that’s been going on, we haven’t made adequate progress,” he added.

Some of the symptoms of glioblastoma include headache, general malaise, and visual problems like double vision.

Parker told OK! magazine he has begun chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment and that he’s “going to fight this all the way.”

“There are so many stories of people who were given a bad prognosis and are still here five, 10, even 15 years later,” he said. 

His wife added that his bandmates from The Wanted have rallied around him. Jay McGuinness and Max George have visited the couple, Hardwick said. 

“Siva [Kaneswaran] and Nathan [Sykes] obviously live a lot further away, but all four of the boys have been texting regularly and sending through different articles and possible treatments and therapies that they’re all reading about,” Hardwick said. “They’ve been amazing.”

The Wanted’s Tom Parker aims to raise awareness following diagnosis

Tom Parker has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour, pictured in May 2013. (Getty Images)
Tom Parker has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour, pictured in May 2013. (Getty Images)

The Wanted’s Tom Parker has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour.

The boy band singer, 32, said he was “still in shock” after being told six weeks ago that he had a type of tumour called a stage 4 glioblastoma

He received the diagnosis shortly before he is due to become a dad for the second time.

“There’s no easy way to say this but I’ve sadly been diagnosed with a Brain Tumour and I’m already undergoing treatment,” he wrote on Instagram, alongside a picture of himself and his wife, Kelsey Hardwick and their 16-month-old daughter, Aurelia.

Parker went on to say he hopes to remain positive, despite being told the cancer diagnosis is terminal.

“We are all absolutely devastated but we are gonna fight this all the way,” his post continues. “We don’t want your sadness, we just want love and positivity and together we will raise awareness of this terrible disease and look for all available treatment options.

“It’s gonna be a tough battle but with everyone’s love and support we are going to beat this.”

Read more: Brain cancer patient, 32, given six weeks to live ‘still fighting’ two years later

In an interview with OK! magazine, Parker revealed he suffered a seizure in July and was put on a waiting list for an MRI scan.

Six weeks later he had another, more serious seizure during a family trip to Norwich and was rushed to hospital.

After three days of tests, he was given the diagnosis that he was suffering from grade four glioblastoma.

What are the symptoms of a brain tumour?

The symptoms of a brain tumour will depend upon which part of the brain is affected, according to Brain Tumour Research.

The most common symptoms are caused by an increase in pressure in the skull caused by the growth of a tumour in the brain.

Other common symptoms, which may initially come and go, can include one or more of the following:

  • Headaches

  • Eye and vision-related problems (such as squinting and double-vision)

  • Continuing nausea, vomiting 

  • Extreme or sudden drowsiness

  • Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) or hearing loss 

  • Unexplained twitches of the face or limbs

  • Seizures (fits or faints)

  • Appearing to be lost in a deep daydream for a short while

  • Confusion

  • Loss of balance

  • Numbness or weakness in the arms or legs, especially if progressive and leading to paralysis

  • Numbness or weakness in a part of the face, so that the muscles drop slightly

  • Numbness or weakness on one side of the body, resulting in stumbling or lack of co-ordination

  • Changes in personality or behaviour

  • Impaired memory or mental ability, which may be very subtle to begin with

  • Changes in senses, including smell

  • Problems with speech, writing or drawing

  • Loss of concentration or difficulty in concentrating

  • Changes in sleep patterns

Read more: Sarah Harding is undergoing treatment for breast cancer

“Depending on which part of the

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