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Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute Opens New Location In Lake Worth

FCS Chief Marketing & Sales Officer Shelly Glenn; Medical Assistant Lucille Johnson; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Shaachi Gupta, MD, MPH; FCS Chief Executive Officer Nathan Walcker; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Napoleon Santos, DO; Office Manager Anna Gallardo; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Howard M. Goodman, MD; Regional Director Laura Greene; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Shachar Peles, MD; Medical Assistant Ashlee Owens; Michele Innocent, APRN; Medical Assistant Paola Council; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Elizabeth Byron, MD; Kelsey Hagan, PA-C; Regional Physician Liaison Manager Rebecca Appelbaum
FCS Chief Marketing & Sales Officer Shelly Glenn; Medical Assistant Lucille Johnson; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Shaachi Gupta, MD, MPH; FCS Chief Executive Officer Nathan Walcker; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Napoleon Santos, DO; Office Manager Anna Gallardo; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Howard M. Goodman, MD; Regional Director Laura Greene; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Shachar Peles, MD; Medical Assistant Ashlee Owens; Michele Innocent, APRN; Medical Assistant Paola Council; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Elizabeth Byron, MD; Kelsey Hagan, PA-C; Regional Physician Liaison Manager Rebecca Appelbaum
FCS Chief Marketing & Sales Officer Shelly Glenn; Medical Assistant Lucille Johnson; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Shaachi Gupta, MD, MPH; FCS Chief Executive Officer Nathan Walcker; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Napoleon Santos, DO; Office Manager Anna Gallardo; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Howard M. Goodman, MD; Regional Director Laura Greene; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Shachar Peles, MD; Medical Assistant Ashlee Owens; Michele Innocent, APRN; Medical Assistant Paola Council; Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Elizabeth Byron, MD; Kelsey Hagan, PA-C; Regional Physician Liaison Manager Rebecca Appelbaum
Chief Executive Officer Nathan Walcker; President & Managing Physician Lucio Gordan, MD, Medical Oncologist Shachar Peles, MD
Chief Executive Officer Nathan Walcker; President & Managing Physician Lucio Gordan, MD, Medical Oncologist Shachar Peles, MD
Chief Executive Officer Nathan Walcker; President & Managing Physician Lucio Gordan, MD, Medical Oncologist Shachar Peles, MD

Fort Myers, Fla., Oct. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Fort Myers, Fla., Oct. 12, 2020 — Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute (FCS) opened a new facility at 4801 South Congress Ave., Lake Worth, FL 33461 to provide comprehensive treatments and a variety of services to adults with cancer and other diseases. The new location replaces the previous FCS clinic at 5507 South Congress Ave., Suite 130, Atlantis, FL 33462.

The clinic is an expansion of space that includes more than 9,000 square feet, nine private exam rooms and 22 chemotherapy infusion chairs. Patients have access to all existing services and providers, in a comfortable, spacious setting.

“We are thrilled to have the opportunity to provide patients who live in and around Palm Beach County with convenient access to the most advanced treatments close to home,” said FCS CEO Nathan H. Walcker.

“Our new location offers the most advanced treatments for cancer, blood disorders and other diseases in an individualized and compassionate manner,” said FCS President & Managing Physician Dr. Lucio Gordan.

FCS Medical Oncologist Dr. Shachar Peles said, “My colleagues and I are excited to be able to care for our patients in this new facility. It’s a privilege to provide cutting-edge cancer treatments in the comfort of our patients’ local community.”

Four Board-certified medical oncologists Drs. Elizabeth Byron, Shaachi Gupta, Shachar Peles, Napoleon Santos and Board-certified gynecologic oncologist Dr. Howard Goodman, are joined by a team of cancer experts and support staff to provide care in the new Lake Worth office.

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About Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, LLC: (FLCancer.com)

Recognized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) with a national Clinical Trials Participation Award, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute (FCS) offers patients access to more clinical trials than any private oncology practice in Florida. Over the past 5 years, the majority of new cancer drugs approved for use in the U.S. were

WilCo Opens Coronavirus Testing Site In Georgetown

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TX — Williamson County health district officials on Wednesday announced the opening of a new COVID-19 testing site in Georgetown.

The Williamson County and Cities Health District is partnering with the Texas Department of Emergency Management and the City of Georgetown to open the COVID-19 testing site in the parking lot north of the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. Eighth St., starting Friday. The walk-up site will operate seven days per week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“With the potential for an increase in COVID-19 cases this fall, testing is an important way for residents to find out if they have the virus,” Georgetown Mayor Dale Ross said in a prepared statement. “We really appreciate the Health District and the state for staffing this convenient, free testing site in Georgetown that will be available every day of the week.”

Registration is required before visiting the testing booth. Pre-registered participants will be given a test kit, asked to self-administer the oral fluid swab kit on-site, then return the kit to the testing booth staff. Test results are typically returned within 48 hours.

“We’re working closely with our partners to ensure the availability of testing as well as quick turnaround times for results,” Williamson County and Cities Health District Executive Director Derrick Neal said in a prepared statement. “We are determined to support safer, healthier communities by providing access to anyone who wishes to be tested for COVID-19.”

The testing is free for all ages and is open to anyone who believes they may have been exposed to the virus recently, or who is experiencing symptoms such as fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

To complete the required pre-registration visit the Curative COVID-19 Detection portal. For more information on COVID-19, visit the Williamson County and Cities Health District website or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention homepage.

This article originally appeared on the Cedar Park-Leander Patch

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Fred Hutch opens dedicated research center in Seattle to test treatments for COVID-19 patients

The COVID-19 Clinical Research Center, foreground, in the Minor Building on Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s Seattle campus. (Fred Hutch Photo)

Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is opening a new facility dedicated to testing treatments for people who have tested positive for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Clinical Research Center, or CCRC is one of the first stand-alone facilities in the country designed for such work, according to Fred Hutch announcement on Monday. Located in the Minor Building on Fred Hutch’s South Lake Union campus, it was funded by philanthropic donations and public/private partnerships.

Scientists and clinicians will partner in the space with study volunteers, health care providers, research institutes, foundations and the biotech/pharmaceutical industry on Phase 1 through 3 clinical trials (observational and interventional) for COVID-19-positive participants.

Two studies are already underway:

  • A Phase 3 randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of remdesivir (GS-5734TM) treatment of individuals with COVID-19 who are not ill enough to be hospitalized. Infectious disease doctors at Fred Hutch and the University of Washington School of Medicine are testing whether remdesivir can reduce symptoms and the need for hospitalization in individuals with early stage COVID-19.
  • A Phase 2/3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial examining REGN-COV2, Regeneron’s investigational double antibody cocktail, in non-hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. In this study, which is for people diagnosed with COVID-19 with or without symptoms of the disease, researchers at Fred Hutch and UW Medicine will further test REGN-COV2 and help determine whether it can provide immediate antiviral activity, lasting several weeks.

Fred Hutch says multiple measures are in place to address the safety of study participants and those who are on-site, including air circulation that meets or exceeds standards in medical facilities; separate entry/exits and restrooms for study volunteers with known or potential COVID-19; restricted and secure access to the facility to prevent unauthorized/accidental access; appropriate personal protective equipment for all staff and participants; extensive cleaning and disinfecting protocols.

The facility can be used in the future to test and treat participants with other infectious diseases, Fred Hutch said.

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2020 Nobel season opens with medicine prize

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Stockholm (AFP)

Breakthroughs in the field of health will be honoured Monday when the 2020 Nobel season kicks off with the medicine prize, as the world battles the worst pandemic in a century.

The medicine prize announcement, due at 11:30 am (0930 GMT), will be followed by the physics prize on Tuesday and chemistry on Wednesday.

The most closely-watched awards — for literature and peace — will follow on Thursday and Friday, while the economics prize wraps things up on Monday, October 12.

This year, the coronavirus pandemic has put the global spotlight on research.

“The pandemic is a big crisis for mankind, but it illustrates how important science is,” Nobel Foundation head Lars Heikensten said.

No prizes are expected to be awarded this year for work directly linked to the new coronavirus, as Nobel prizewinning research usually takes many years to be verified.

The prize-awarding committees are “not in any way influenced by what is happening in the world at the time,” Erling Norrby, the former permanent secretary of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences which awards the science prizes, told AFP.

“It takes time before a prize can mature, I would say at least 10 years before you can fully understand the impact” of a discovery, Norrby, himself a virologist, said.

The work of the various prize committees is shrouded in secrecy and the names of the nominees are not disclosed for 50 years, leading to rampant speculation.

– T-cells, breast cancer, scissors? –

Swedish public radio SR and the country’s biggest daily Dagens Nyheter both suggested Monday’s medicine prize could go to French-born Australian Jacques Miller and Max Cooper of the US for their discoveries of T-cells and B-cells in the 1960s, which led to breakthroughs in cancer and virus research.

The pair won the prestigious Lasker Prize in the US last year.

Or the nod could go to Lebanese-born American geneticist Huda Zoghbi for her discovery of a genetic mutation that leads to the brain disorder Rett Syndrome, both SR and Dagens Nyheter said.

Dagens Nyheter also tipped American Mary-Claire King, who discovered the BRCA1 gene responsible for a hereditary form of breast cancer, and researchers who worked on a cure for Hepatitis C, Ralf Bartenschlager of Germany and Americans Charles Rice and Michael Sofia — a trio also awarded the Lasker Prize in 2016.

Two names mentioned frequently are Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US, for their gene-editing technique known as the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool, a type of genetic “scissors” used to cut out a mutated gene in a human embryo and replace it with a corrected version.

Chinese-born American Feng Zhang also claims to have discovered the technique, which could be eligible for both the medicine and chemistry prize.

Others also mentioned include immunologists Marc Feldmann of Australia and Indian-born British researcher Ravinder Maini, for work on rheumatoid arthritis, and American oncologist Dennis Slamon for research on breast cancer and the drug treatment Herceptin.

NBC’s Kristen Dahlgren Opens Up About the Hardest Side Effect of Breast Cancer Treatment

Photo credit: NBC - Getty Images
Photo credit: NBC – Getty Images

From Prevention

  • Kristen Dahlgren, 48, just shared the most difficult side effect of her stage 2 breast cancer treatment.

  • The NBC News correspondent said she’s lost feeling in her chest after having a mastectomy.

  • Dahlgren, who is currently in remission, plans to have a resensation procedure along with tissue reconstruction surgery later this year.

Kristen Dahlgren has been living with a side effect she never expected following her stage 2 breast cancer diagnosis last year. The NBC News correspondent shared in an essay for Today that she experiences “discomfort and numbness” in her chest following a mastectomy.

“Of all of the side effects of treatment, for me, this may be the hardest,” Dahlgren wrote, adding that the lack of feeling is a constant reminder of everything she’s been through. “It hits me every time I take a deep breath, or get a hug, and especially when my daughter lays her head on my chest. That’s when I really ‘feel’ the toll the breast cancer has taken.”

Dahlgren was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer in July 2019 after noticing an unusual dent in her breast. Although she had no family history of breast cancer and had received normal mammogram results just five months earlier, she decided to get another test. Shortly after, her breast cancer diagnosis was confirmed.

To treat the disease quickly, she underwent chemotherapy during the coronavirus pandemic and announced on Twitter she was cancer-free in April 2020. “I feel great,” she told Hoda Kotb and Savannah Guthrie in a new interview with Today. “I’m praying every day that my health holds out.”

Dahlgren is now entering the third phase of her recovery: breast reconstruction surgery. She also plans to undergo a “resensation” procedure that will hopefully help her regain feeling in her chest.

Her doctor, Constance Chen, M.D., a reconstructive plastic surgeon who helps breast cancer patients experiencing this side effect, “cannot say it works for everyone, but she says when it works, it works well.”

“Before breast cancer, I never realized that women who have mastectomies lose feeling in their chests. It makes sense, of course—since the nerves are cut during the surgery—but it’s not something that is often talked about,” she wrote in the Today essay. “For me, I’d really just love to feel a hug—or my little girl cuddled up against me on the couch. If [the procedure] doesn’t work, life certainly goes on, but like I have so often in the past year, for now, I am hanging on to hope.”

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New Fitness Center Opens In Patchogue

PATCHOGUE, NY — For those hoping to lose the “quarantine 15,” a new fitness center recently opened up Patchogue.

Owner Vincenzo Masone, who competes as a super heavyweight bodybuilder, said South Shore Iron at NPV on 208 East Main Street is a space for others who have a passion for bodybuilding, health and fitness. He is opening the business alongside co-owner David McIntyre.

The 28,000-square-foot health club has three floors of equipment and various training programs.

“Our facility is run by current and former fitness professionals who know how to assess and evaluate the everyday person in order to help them achieve their fitness goals,” Masone told Patch.

The 27-year-old, who is hoping to obtain his professional status as a bodybuilder this year, delayed the opening date of his first-ever business until the state allowed fitness centers to open at 33 percent capacity August 24.

Despite the delay, Masone and McIntyre were excited to open in Patchogue.

“Patchogue is a young, inspiring town that is full of energy,” Masone said. “We cater to the demographics of this community for people of all ages. We have something for everyone. The town of Patchogue has been building for years and is becoming the ultimate strip on Long Island. We are proud to be a part of that and to be able to provide a service for the community.”

The two said that anyone who walks into the business will instantly become part of their “fitness family.”

This article originally appeared on the Patchogue Patch

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