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Trump works from Oval Office six days after COVID-19 diagnosis

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE worked from the Oval Office on Wednesday, less than a week after his coronavirus diagnosis, as his doctor said he was feeling “great” and experiencing no symptoms.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that coronavirus patients self-isolate for at least 10 days after the onset of their symptoms. Trump tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday and spent three days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Facility receiving care over the weekend, returning to the White House on Monday evening. 

A White House spokesman said Trump is being briefed on stimulus talks and Hurricane Delta. A Marine stood outside the entrance to the West Wing, a sign that the president is at work inside.

Trump tweeted Wednesday that he had spoken with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) about the hurricane, and shared local Federal Emergency Management Agency guidance for individuals to prepare for the storm.

“Please heed the directions of your State and Local Officials. We are working with them very closely — please be prepared, be careful, and be safe!” Trump tweeted.

 

In working from the Oval Office, Trump may be increasing the risk that others in the West Wing catch the virus. It was not clear who was briefing Trump on Wednesday afternoon. 

A growing number of individuals working in the White House or connected to Trump’s campaign or who otherwise have recently attended White House events have tested positive for the virus over the past week.  

White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFormer GOP chair Michael Steele calls Trump ‘the superspreader’ in the White House Murkowski after Trump halts talks: Congress must move on virus package Overnight Health Care: Trump calls off coronavirus relief talks MORE said earlier Wednesday that Trump had wanted to work from the Oval Office on Tuesday — one day after he returned from the hospital — and the White House was instituting safety protocols in order to ensure that it is safe. Trump has otherwise been working out of the residence, where he and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpDemocratic Rep. Carbajal tests positive for COVID-19 Biden: ‘We shouldn’t have’ second debate if Trump still has COVID-19 Overnight Defense: Top military officers quarantine after positive COVID case | Distracted pilot,

California governor’s office tells diners to wear masks “in between bites”

The California governor’s office put out a tweet on Saturday advising that restaurant-goers keep their masks on while dining. “Going out to eat with members of your household this weekend?” the tweet reads. “Don’t forget to keep your mask on in between bites. Do your part to keep those around you healthy.”

In California, masks are required for anyone going outside their home, as well as workers in customer-facing businesses, offices, factories, and health care professionals, among others, according to the state’s COVID-19 guidance.

While children under 2 years old and those with breathing troubles or medical exemptions do not need to wear a mask, everyone else is required to wear them in all indoor public places — and also outdoors if keeping 6 feet of social distance with others isn’t possible.

The official guidance does say that masks can be removed for a number of reasons, including eating or drinking. However, the tweet from Governor Gavin Newsom’s office offered somewhat different advice, which confused some Twitter users.

“I’m very confused by this tweet. The image suggests you should only take your mask off once when you begin a meal but the text suggests you should put it back on between bites,” journalist Matthew Fuhrman wrote, referring to the graphic shared in the tweet. 

“Should we wash our hands after touching our mask each time we remove it between bites? What if I’m eating chips and salsa and I go for a double dip? Is that technically two bites since it’s the same chip?” another person asked.

“This violates the @WHO ‘Dont’s of Mask wearing,'” another person tweeted, including a graphic from the World Health Organization which advises people to avoid touching their mask as much as possible, and to wash their hands before touching their mask and after discarding it. 

CBS News has reached out to the governor’s office for more information on the guidance in the tweet.

In California’s published guidance for dining in restaurants, wearing a mask in between bites is not mentioned. Physical distancing to the maximum extent possible, the use of face coverings by workers and customers, frequent hand-washing and regular disinfecting are among the elements of the COVID-19 prevention plan. Many counties in California currently limit indoor restaurants to 25% of normal capacity, or are allowing outdoor dining only, depending on local infection rates. 

In New York, which also has a statewide mask mandate and has reopened limited indoor and outdoor dining, the rule is to wear face coverings at all times — except while seated at a restaurants. In Georgia, where masks are “strongly encouraged” but not required, there is an exception “when eating, drinking, or exercising outdoors.” 

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First lady’s office details safety protocols for White House residence staff

The White House on Tuesday detailed measures taken to protect residence staff from the spread of the coronavirus, including the addition of health consultants, as workers face increased risk from a COVID-19 outbreak in the building.

The first lady’s office said residence staff in direct contact with the first family are tested for COVID-19 daily, and support staff are tested every other day. The White House residence has hired independent health consultants to facilitate additional testing as needed and check on staff and their families.

The residence also added a “well-being” consultant as a resource for workers looking for mental health assistance. Staffers can speak to the consultant anonymously, the first lady’s office said.

“With the recent positive results of the President and First Lady, staff wear full PPE [personal protective equipment] and continue to take all necessary precautions, which include updated procedures to protect against cross contamination,” the East Wing said in a news release.

The East Wing said Tuesday that the residence has been subject to “hospital-grade disinfection policies” since March and encouraged teleworking to the extent that it is possible.

Residence staff have been required to wear masks since April, despite the president flouting that practice himself.

The accounting of health protocols in place in the residence comes days after President TrumpDonald John TrumpState Department revokes visa of Giuliani-linked Ukrainian ally: report White House Gift Shop selling ‘Trump Defeats COVID’ commemorative coin Biden says he should not have called Trump a clown in first debate MORE and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpWhite House Gift Shop selling ‘Trump Defeats COVID’ commemorative coin Hillicon Valley: CEOs of Google, Facebook and Twitter to testify before Senate | European Union police agency warns of increase in cybercrime | Twitter to remove posts hoping for Trump’s death White House not contact tracing Rose Garden event considered possible ‘superspreader’: report MORE tested positive for the highly contagious coronavirus. Since then, the number of positive tests among those in their orbit has ballooned to include at least three press shop staffers, a military aide and two workers in the residence.

The president spent three days in the hospital getting treated for his COVID-19 infection and required supplemental oxygen on Friday and Saturday. He returned to the White House on Monday evening.

But President Trump appears unchanged by his first-hand experience with the virus, telling Americans not to be afraid of the disease and ripping off his mask upon returning to the executive mansion despite still being contagious.

The first lady, by contrast, has put out multiple PSAs urging Americans to wear masks and socially distance. She has been recovering from the virus at the residence, and has said she is doing well.

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Governor’s Office Won’t Disclose Number of Infected Staffers | Missouri News

ST. LOUIS (AP) — As Missouri Gov. Mike Parson continues to recover from the coronavirus, his office is declining to say how many members of his staff also have tested positive.

Parson’s spokeswoman, Kelli Jones, has not responded to several requests for information on staff illnesses, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Friday. Jones did not immediately respond to an inquiry from The Associated Press.

The decision not to provide information on illnesses within the office differs from the practice of other state agencies that have routinely reported virus cases since the pandemic began. For example, the Missouri Department of Corrections has reported 613 positive tests among employees since the onset of the pandemic, and the Department of Mental Health says 384 workers have tested positive, with four deaths.

An estimated three dozen people work closely with the Republican governor. Parson and his wife, Teresa, tested positive on Sept. 23. Neither has developed serious symptoms.

Parson’s office earlier confirmed a number of staffers on his team were in quarantine and working from home after the Parsons’ positive tests.

Meanwhile, Missouri leaders were still declining to impose new restrictions or mandate masks, even as the state remained in the White House Coronavirus Task Force’s “red zone.”

Missouri’s rate of new COVID-19 cases and percentage of positive test results were among the highest in the U.S. for September, the Post-Dispatch reported. The federal task force warned that those numbers put Missouri in a vulnerable position heading into the fall and winter.

Hospitalizations in Missouri for COVID-19 rose by 29% in September to their highest levels during the pandemic, with the surge occurring largely in rural areas and mid-sized cities.

“Institute mask requirements in counties with ongoing transmission; reduce capacity for indoor dining and bars while expanding outdoor dining options,” the latest task force report, dated Sept. 27, advised.

Missouri has had no statewide restrictions since June 15.

Parson said in a livestreamed news conference this week that his staff is continuing to focus on what he calls “four pillars.” They are: increasing testing, having enough protective equipment for health workers, making sure hospitals do not reach capacity and providing transparent data.

“I want to reassure everyone that all four of these pillars are stable. We monitor this every day, and we are constantly working to improve. The fight is not over, but we are on the right track, and we will get through this,” Parson said.

Meanwhile, Dr. Randall Williams, director of the Missouri Department of Health and Human Services, told the Post-Dispatch that because of the state’s diversity, government officials are letting local leaders decide when to implement restrictions rather than enacting statewide benchmarks.

Missouri on Friday reported 1,485 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus, bringing the total to 129,397 since the pandemic began. The state also reported 16 new deaths, bringing the total to 2,144.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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DVIDS – News – Navy Medicine Force Master Chief Office Changes Hands


Force Master Chief (FORCM) Michael J. Roberts relieved FORCM Hosea Smith Jr. as Navy Medicine’s Force Master Chief and Director of the Hospital Corps during a change of office ceremony at the Defense Health Headquarters Oct. 1.

Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham, Navy Surgeon General and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, presided over the ceremony as staff witnessed the change of office.

“FORCM Smith focused on readiness and that has value to me, and to this organization,” said Gillingham. “FORCM has made significant contributions to Navy Medicine. Driving forward initiatives that are professionalizing the Hospital Corps and preparing it for the unknown challenges of the future.”

As the 15th director of the Hospital Corps, FORCM Smith represented more than 26,000 Hospital Corpsmen, ensuring they received the proper training to provide Sailors, Marines and families around the globe the best care our nation can offer.

“To all the corpsmen out there, you have something great, you have every opportunity to succeed,” said Smith. “You are integral to the Navy Medicine mission, I have traveled the world and seen the best Hospital Corpsmen out there, hands down.”

Roberts assumed the role as the enlisted leader of Navy Medicine and director of the Hospital Corps following the ceremonial “passing of the cutlass”.

Roberts is now serving as the 16th Navy Medicine force master chief. He previously served as the Command Master Chief at I Marine Expeditionary Force.

Navy Medicine consists of highly trained, professional people, who operate from well designed platforms, using high performance techniques to provide medical power to support naval superiority world-wide.





Date Taken: 10.02.2020
Date Posted: 10.02.2020 14:28
Story ID: 380117
Location: US




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COVID-19 changes at the dentist office

PERRYSBURG, Ohio (WTVG) -Dental offices across the country are back in business amid COVID-19, with all new protocols in place.



a group of people in a room: Dental offices across the country are back in business amid COVID-19, with all new protocols in place.


© Provided by Toledo WTVG
Dental offices across the country are back in business amid COVID-19, with all new protocols in place.

“I think patients can feel very comfortable going back to dentist offices and I very much encourage them to do so,” said Owens Community College Dental Hygiene Instructor Sue Nichols.

Inside Owens Health Technologies Hall dental students are back on campus hard at work, honing their craft with hands-on clinicals. Dental Hygiene students can be found working inside the mouths of their peers, learning how to properly provide teeth cleaning services and proper oral care. This semester looks a bit different amid COVID-19 for the class of 25 students within the program.

“The first thing we really implemented was that all of the students have to wear face shields, so on time of masks they wear a face shield to protect them against aerosols, generating from them being over a patient’s open mouth,” said Sue Nichols.



a group of people standing in a kitchen: Owens students dawn facial masks, face shields, gloves, and plastic gowns.


© Provided by Toledo WTVG
Owens students dawn facial masks, face shields, gloves, and plastic gowns.

In a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Study, the job of dental hygienist ranked as the most “At-risk” profession for contracting COVID-19. The study found the risk stems from hygienists’ close exposure to virus particles living inside the mouths of patients.’

“I do feel safe, and I feel very safe for our students, I think we’ve put everything in place that you would want to protect yourself from anything that’s aerosolized,” said Sue Nichols.

At Owens, like dentist offices across the country, the school is limiting procedures that promote the spread of air-born germs. Students now are required to wear added hair bonnets, face shields, and gloves. Dental stations and equipment are also required to undergo thorough cleanings after every use.

“I know that the instructors have put systems in place to make us succeed and not only keep us safe but keep the patients safe as well,” said Olivia Wesley.

Olivia Wesley is a first-year student in Owens Dental Hygienist program. Wesley is only 5 weeks into the program.



a woman wearing a costume: Owens students thoroughly wash their hands before and after operating inside their on campus dental hygiene clinic.


© Provided by Toledo WTVG
Owens students thoroughly wash their hands before and after operating inside their on campus dental hygiene clinic.

“Through it all we are being set up for success and I know that we are going to be ready to work and be confident in the environment that we are working in,” said Wesley.

The dental program offers oral hygiene services to the public at discounted rates inside their on-campus clinic. You can schedule an appointment on their website.

Copyright 2020 WTVG. All rights reserved.

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Santa Fe dentist’s office reopens after COVID-19 closure | Coronavirus

A Santa Fe dental practice reopened Monday following a nearly two-week closure due to confirmed cases of COVID-19 for the doctor and one of his assistants.

Dentist Jared French said he saw one patient Sept. 14, a Monday, and then felt an itch in his throat and went home.

He took a test that afternoon to determine if he had contracted COVID-19, French said, and after it came back positive two days later, he closed his practice.

A patient, an assistant and a dental hygienist who were at the office Sept. 16 before the closure all tested negative.

“It’s a dicey situation. You have to open back up, but you want to protect people,” French said. “We were able to prevent transmission. In the end, that’s what really matters.”

Under guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for health care workers, French was not required to wait 14 days before returning to work. The CDC’s symptom-based guidelines say it’s safe to return to work if at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared, at least 24 hours have passed since the patient last experienced fever and other symptoms have improved.

The doctor’s wife, Lara French, said she believes she might have become infected with COVID-19 while visiting family in Utah earlier this month and then infected her husband while she was quarantining after her return.

“It’s hard to know,” Lara French said. “I was only in close contact with a few family members there, but I think that’s where I got it.”

Maddy Hayden, a spokeswoman with the New Mexico Environment Department, said the agency performed a rapid response at the dental office, which involves ensuring employers are following COVID-19 safety guidelines. Monitors determined a further investigation by the Occupational Health and Safety Bureau was not warranted, Hayden said.

During the roughly 48 hours between when the time French left the office with a symptom of the illness and the time he closed the practice, a dental hygienist — who did not work at the office Sept. 14 — saw patients at the practice, the dentist said.

French said he felt comfortable leaving the practice open while he awaited his test result because people who had close contact with him were isolating and the facility had been following health, safety and cleaning guidelines.

“We followed policies and tried to be reasonable, and that’s the decision we made,” French said. “I think the proof is in the pudding, as there was no transmission.”

At least one patient thought French should have closed the practice sooner or at least alerted patients about the possible infection.

“If someone had told me he was sick and went to get tested, I would have changed my appointment,” said Harriet Schreiner, who visited the office the morning of Sept. 16, a Wednesday.

She believes French put her and others in harm’s way by not disclosing he had left the office two days prior with COVID-19 symptoms.

“Nobody said anything to me

Santa Fe dentist’s office reopens after COVID-19 closure | Coronavirus

A Santa Fe dental practice reopened Monday following a nearly two-week closure due to confirmed cases of COVID-19 for the doctor and one of his assistants.

Dentist Jared French said he saw one patient Sept. 14, a Monday, and then felt an itch in his throat and went home.

He took a test that afternoon to determine if he had contracted COVID-19, French said, and after it came back positive two days later, he closed his practice.

A patient, an assistant and a dental hygienist who were at the office Sept. 16 before the closure all tested negative.

“It’s a dicey situation. You have to open back up, but you want to protect people,” French said. “We were able to prevent transmission. In the end, that’s what really matters.”

Under guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for health care workers, French was not required to wait 14 days before returning to work. The CDC’s symptom-based guidelines say it’s safe to return to work if at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared, at least 24 hours have passed since the patient last experienced fever and other symptoms have improved.

The doctor’s wife, Lara French, said she believes she might have become infected with COVID-19 while visiting family in Utah earlier this month and then infected her husband while she was quarantining after her return.

“It’s hard to know,” Lara French said. “I was only in close contact with a few family members there, but I think that’s where I got it.”

Maddy Hayden, a spokeswoman with the New Mexico Environment Department, said the agency performed a rapid response at the dental office, which involves ensuring employers are following COVID-19 safety guidelines. Monitors determined a further investigation by the Occupational Health and Safety Bureau was not warranted, Hayden said.

During the roughly 48 hours between when the time French left the office with a symptom of the illness and the time he closed the practice, a dental hygienist — who did not work at the office Sept. 14 — saw patients at the practice, the dentist said.

French said he felt comfortable leaving the practice open while he awaited his test result because people who had close contact with him were isolating and the facility had been following health, safety and cleaning guidelines.

“We followed policies and tried to be reasonable, and that’s the decision we made,” French said. “I think the proof is in the pudding, as there was no transmission.”

At least one patient thought French should have closed the practice sooner or at least alerted patients about the possible infection.

“If someone had told me he was sick and went to get tested, I would have changed my appointment,” said Harriet Schreiner, who visited the office the morning of Sept. 16, a Wednesday.

She believes French put her and others in harm’s way by not disclosing he had left the office two days prior with COVID-19 symptoms.

“Nobody said anything to me

How To Choose The Best Dental Office For Dental Therapy

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