Showing: 1 - 9 of 9 RESULTS

Maggie Smith, Author Of ‘Keep Moving’ : NPR

Keep Moving, by Maggie Smith

Atria/One Signal Publishers


hide caption

toggle caption

Atria/One Signal Publishers

Have you ever had this experience? You were having the most awful, terrible day and a stranger does something kind, and it nearly brings you to tears.

Maybe they wave you on instead of honking when you cut them off in traffic. Or maybe you get to the front of the coffee line to find the guy in front of you already paid for your drink.

And in the midst of your total misery, this total stranger has done you a good turn. And it means the world. Reading Maggie Smith’s new book Keep Moving feels kind of like that. It is a meditation on kindness and hope, and how to move forward through grief.

Smith says she started writing the book as her marriage was ending. “Keep Moving began as sort of ‘notes to self’ that I wrote for myself each day to pep-talk myself through this really dark time. And I posted them on Twitter as a way to hold myself accountable and to sort of share my struggle with others. And a couple of surprising things happened because of those tweets. I found my way into a new kind of optimism that I hadn’t experienced before, and I found that the posts were really meeting people where they were in their lives at that time, too.”

Interview Highlights

On writing the book she needed to read herself

Other people can tell you, in hard times, “You’re going to be fine.” But if you’re not telling yourself that, sometimes it’s hard to believe. And I think one of the things I realized when writing this book is the most important conversation that you have each day is the one you have with yourself. And if that’s not a kind and gentle, sort of brave-making conversation, then what other people are telling us sort of slips off of us.

On trusting that the present moment has something to teach you

I think in some ways this really summarizes what what I was trying to do with the book, which is to think about reimagining my life at a time where I thought it was over. You know, it felt like a catastrophic change. If I imagined a Venn diagram of emotions, I think my feelings was sort of that spot where fear and sadness and anger and confusion overlap. It’s not a good Venn diagram … And I think we are all feeling a lot of that now because of the pandemic, because of so much unrest in this country and in the world. And we have to think about, not the life that we had last year, but thinking about what the life we have now still offers us, and what is still possible

Work Or Online Learning? Homeless Families Face An Impossible Choice : NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

The closure of school buildings in response to the coronavirus has been disruptive and inconvenient for many families, but for those living in homeless shelters or hotel rooms — including roughly 1.5 million school-aged children — the shuttering of classrooms and cafeterias has been disastrous.

For Rachel, a 17-year-old sharing a hotel room in Cincinnati with her mother, the disaster has been academic. Her school gave her a laptop, but “hotel Wi-Fi is the worst,” she says. “Every three seconds [my teacher is] like, ‘Rachel, you’re glitching. Rachel, you’re not moving.'”

For Vanessa Shefer, the disaster has made her feel “defeated.” Since May, when the family home burned, she and her four children have stayed in a hotel, a campground and recently left rural New Hampshire to stay with extended family in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Her kids ask, “When are we going to have a home?” But Shefer says she can’t afford a “home” without a good-paying job, and she can’t get a job while her kids need help with school.

For this story, NPR spoke with students, parents, caregivers, shelter managers and school leaders across the country about what it means, in this moment, to be homeless and schoolless.

Vanessa Shefer (right) walks with her family along the Passumpsic River in St. Johnsbury, Vt.

Ian Thomas Janssen-Lonnquist for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Ian Thomas Janssen-Lonnquist for NPR

Vanessa Shefer (right) walks with her family along the Passumpsic River in St. Johnsbury, Vt.

Ian Thomas Janssen-Lonnquist for NPR

“How do you choose between working and … your child’s education?”

Remote learning can be difficult for children without an adult at home to supervise everything from logging on to the learning itself. The past six months have put all parents and caregivers in a bind, but many families who are homeless now find themselves in an impossible situation.

“How do you choose between working and providing for your family, and your child’s education? I mean, what is your priority?” says Patricia Rivera, a former Chicago Public Schools social worker and founder of Chicago HOPES For Kids, an afterschool program for homeless youth.

Rivera points out that many homeless shelters don’t allow parents to leave their children while they go to work. In the past, kids have simply gone to school or parents have found low-cost childcare. But, because of the pandemic, those options have disappeared for many families.

Parents and caregivers experiencing homelessness are also more likely to work low-wage jobs that cannot be done remotely

Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, shown here at a meeting on Monday, has said that the coronavirus death toll is likely higher than the more than 1 million fatalities officially reported.

Christopher Black/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Christopher Black/AP

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, shown here at a meeting on Monday, has said that the coronavirus death toll is likely higher than the more than 1 million fatalities officially reported.

Christopher Black/AP

About 10% of the global population may have been infected by the coronavirus, according to a senior World Health Organization official.

It’s an estimate that’s far higher than the total of global confirmed cases reported by governments. At the same time, it would mean that most of the world’s population is still vulnerable to getting infected and this pandemic is far from over, the WHO’s head of emergencies Dr. Michael Ryan said Monday.

“This varies by country, it varies urban to rural, it varies by different groups,” Ryan said. “But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk.”

The WHO’s executive board is meeting in a special session Monday and Tuesday to review the WHO’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

The meeting at the WHO’s headquarters in Geneva and online comes as the world has officially tallied more than 35 million coronavirus cases and more than 1 million fatalities.

The WHO’s Director-General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said the actual number of deaths from COVID-19 is certainly higher. “Numbers can blind us to the reality that every single life lost is someone who loved and was loved by others – someone’s mother, father, sister, brother, daughter or son,” Tedros said through a mask as he opened the meeting.

“Although all countries have been affected by this virus, we must remember that this is an uneven pandemic. Ten countries account for 70% of all reported cases and deaths, and just 3 countries account for half,” he added. Those three countries are the U.S., India and Brazil.

Tedros and other officials highlighted the WHO’s actions throughout the pandemic, from issuing guidance, to developing the first diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2, to distributing personal protective equipment in low-income countries and expanding PCR testing labs globally.

Ryan said his agency — and the world — are now heading into a difficult phase of this pandemic.

“The disease continues to spread,” he said. “It is on the rise in many parts of the world.”

Cases are spiking most dramatically now in India, but many parts of Latin America are still facing rising daily infection rates. There have been resurgences in several European nations. And in the United States, the number of new infections remains stubbornly high, with the U.S. regularly recording roughly 40,000 cases per day. This is more than Ireland has tallied over the past 9 months.

Ryan said the pandemic will continue to evolve. It may flare up in some places while it wanes in others. But he added that where the pandemic becomes more intense, or

Americans Over 30 Are Drinking 14% More Often During Pandemic, Study Finds : NPR

American adults over 30 say they’re drinking 14% more often during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report in the journal JAMA Network Open.

Luca Bruno/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Luca Bruno/AP

American adults over 30 say they’re drinking 14% more often during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report in the journal JAMA Network Open.

Luca Bruno/AP

Perhaps it’s no surprise, but people are drinking more during the pandemic.

In some cases, by a lot.

American adults say they’re drinking 14% more often during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report in the journal JAMA Network Open. The increase in frequency of drinking for women was more pronounced, up 17% compared to last year.

Instances of heavy drinking among women, which for women was defined as four or more drinks within a couple of hours, spiked by 41%.

The study’s participants were aged 30 to 80, so the report does not offer insight on the pandemic drinking habits of younger adults.

The study took a sample of 1,540 adults and compared their self-reported drinking habits this spring with a year prior.

A quick look at social media suggests many people are using alcohol as a way to relax. Whether it’s “quarantinis” or Zoom happy hours, Americans seem to find a plethora of reasons to drink during the pandemic.

And as people began going to bars less, retail alcohol sales went up.

Stores sold 54% more alcohol in late March compared the year prior, according to Nielsen. Online sales more than doubled.

Some states like New York, Florida and Texas relaxed laws during the pandemic to allow expanded alcohol delivery.

The study used data collected using the RAND Corporation American Life Panel. The authors note a limitation of the study: its findings are based on self-reported data that could be skewed due to societal expectations. Nonetheless, they concluded more research could be warranted on alcohol use and its psychological and physical effects during the pandemic.

Earlier this year, the World Health Organization European office warned against excessive drinking and even said access should be limited during the pandemic.

Drinking may be even more dangerous now as it can negatively affect the body’s immune system, according to the WHO warning.

“Alcohol compromises the body’s immune system and increases the risk of adverse health outcomes,” the WHO stated. “Therefore, people should minimize their alcohol consumption at any time, and particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Source Article

Trump’s COVID-19 Diagnosis And History Of Presidents’ Health : NPR

President Trump exits Marine One at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday in Bethesda, Md. He is staying at the hospital while receiving treatment for the coronavirus.

Alex Edelman/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Alex Edelman/Getty Images

President Trump exits Marine One at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday in Bethesda, Md. He is staying at the hospital while receiving treatment for the coronavirus.

Alex Edelman/Getty Images

No sooner had it become known that President Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus than controversy arose over the amount and detail and truthfulness of the information about his condition that was coming from the White House.

The timeline of Trump’s diagnosis and treatment over the past few days continues to evolve. His medical team’s briefings from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center have at times resulted in more confusion than clarity.

In the latest example, White House physician Sean Conley’s Sunday press conference — like his Saturday one — seemed to raise more questions than it answered.

He said the president had received supplemental oxygen, after declining to confirm that on Saturday, and announced that Trump had started taking a steroid after a second drop in his oxygen levels. Conley explained some of his Saturday statements as “trying to reflect the upbeat attitude” of the doctors and Trump.

In an additional display of optimism, Trump even left the medical center to drive by and wave to supporters gathered outside on Sunday. In a rare move, the White House did not inform reporters that the president would be taking the excursion.

None of opaqueness should come as surprise, though. Few occasions of historical importance have been so shrouded in secrecy — and even outright deception — as the health emergencies of world leaders. The U.S. may have been more transparent about these events than most countries, but, even here, the truth has only come to light over time.

“This is one precedent this president is following,” says Barbara Perry, director of Presidential Studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center.

Perry says the American public has a right to know the health of their presidents, especially now, given that voters are also just weeks away from deciding at the ballot box who is most fit to inhabit the Oval Office.

“They used to say when the president gets a cold, the stock market drops,” Perry says. “It really has an impact on people’s lives, whether it’s the economy, or in this instance, it would help us to know, is he now even capable of governing?”

Here are a few of the more egregious cases of obfuscation in the past, when the health of the president was in question while he was in office.

Exhibit A: The incapacity of Woodrow Wilson

President Woodrow Wilson and his wife, first lady Edith Bolling Wilson, in an undated photo.

AP


hide caption

toggle caption

AP

President Woodrow Wilson and his wife, first lady Edith Bolling Wilson, in an undated photo.

AP

As

Some Health Workers Suffering From Addiction Steal Drugs Meant For Patients : NPR

The federal government estimates one in 10 healthcare workers experience substance use disorder. There is rising concern that medical professionals are stealing powerful opioid pain medications meant for their patients.

Kaz Fantone/NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Kaz Fantone/NPR

The federal government estimates one in 10 healthcare workers experience substance use disorder. There is rising concern that medical professionals are stealing powerful opioid pain medications meant for their patients.

Kaz Fantone/NPR

When Kristin Waite-Labott, a nurse in Wisconsin, began stealing fentanyl and morphine from her hospital’s medical supply cabinets, she found it was relatively easy to cover her tracks.

Her drug inventory paperwork often didn’t add up, but she found coworkers willing to cover for her.

“They trusted me” she said. “Unfortunately I was taking advantage of that trust and that happens all the time.”

But Waite-Labott’s addiction to fentanyl quickly spiraled out of control.

“Taking it one time, I instantly craved more. It’s so powerful and deadly,” she said.

Waite-Labott eventually lost her job and spent time in jail before entering recovery and regaining her nursing license.

She works now helping other health workers who struggle with addiction and says she’s still haunted by the thought of patients she might have harmed.

“I don’t know that I made any errors,” she said. “But I can’t be certain of that because I was under the influence at work.”

NPR found a growing number of health industry experts and researchers who warn this kind of on-the-job drug theft by health workers may be increasing.

“It’s extremely common and the consequences can be very very grave,” said Kimberly New, an expert on medical drug misuse, known in the industry as diversion.

Patients in pain, patients taking contaminated medications

Harm to patients from drug diversion can be severe. In extreme cases, health workers divert so much medication, patients wind up undergoing cancer treatments or post-surgical recovery without pain relief.

“Patients will be left to linger in pain and not receive the doses that they were supposed to receive,” New said. “The diverter has progressed to the point where they’re no longer willing to share with the patients.”

Studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Mayo Clinic also found healthcare workers who steal drugs frequently tamper with medications, leaving them contaminated.

“I go and take a fentanyl vial, I administer the entire vial to myself and I refill the vial with water,” New said, describing a typical scenario. “Unfortunately many patients have been infected with blood-born pathogens.”

The Mayo Clinic study found as many as 28,000 hospital patients were put at risk of contracting Hepatitis C over a 10-year period because of this kind of drug theft and tampering.

Last year, physicians at a Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo, N.Y., reported six of their patients contracted a rare bacterial blood infection after a nurse replaced opioid medications with tap water.

“We share our experience to alert health care providers,” the doctors wrote in The New England Journal of Medicine

Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

Since stepping into the role in 2018, White House physician Sean Conley has played a key part in the president’s medical care. He’s believed to be the first doctor of osteopathic medicine to serve in that position.

Susan Walsh/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Susan Walsh/AP

Since stepping into the role in 2018, White House physician Sean Conley has played a key part in the president’s medical care. He’s believed to be the first doctor of osteopathic medicine to serve in that position.

Susan Walsh/AP

Since President Trump’s announcement of a positive coronavirus test early Friday, a previously little-known White House physician is now an integral source of information on the president’s condition.

Sean Conley, a Navy commander, has been Trump’s physician since 2018. It was a memo from Conley that confirmed Trump’s tweet that he and the first lady tested positive for the coronavirus.

Standing outside at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump was admitted Friday, Conley assured reporters that the president’s symptoms were improving. But he started a series of conflicting messages when he made a reference on Saturday to being “72 hours into the diagnosis.”

He later said he misspoke, and that Trump was first diagnosed Thursday evening.

Conley took over the role from Dr. Ronny Jackson in 2018, after Jackson was nominated to be secretary of veterans affairs. (Jackson subsequently withdrew himself from consideration amid allegations he fostered a hostile work environment and behaved inappropriately on the job.)

Conley supervised Trump’s physical last year, declaring the president in “very good health overall.”

After Trump dined with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro in March, members of Bolsonaro’s administration soon tested positive for the virus, including one who was at the dinner. Conley publicly stated that Trump was at low risk for the coronavirus because of limited interactions with infected individuals that “occurred before any symptom onset.”

Bolsonaro would go on to announce he had the virus in July.

Perhaps most notable of Conley’s decisions was prescribing the drug hydroxychloroquine as a coronavirus preventative in May. In a memo, Conley said he and the president had numerous discussions over the risks and potential benefits of the drug.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in June found the drug does not protect against infection.

Unlike his predecessor, Conley doesn’t have an M.D. Instead he has a D.O.: doctor of osteopathic medicine. He graduated in 2006 from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, according to the school.

Osteopathic medicine is a field geared toward a holistic approach, focusing on the role of lifestyle and environmental factors, according to the American Osteopathic Association. Doctors in the field are fully licensed physicians. In a May 2018 blog post, the organization noted that Conley may have been the first D.O. to serve as a president’s physician.

According to a LinkedIn entry, Conley has served as an emergency physician for the U.S. Navy since 2006. Both the LinkedIn page for Conley — and a listing by the Virginia Board of

What We Know Of President Trump’s COVID-19 Diagnosis : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19.

Alex Brandon/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Alex Brandon/AP

President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19.

Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump tweeted early Friday morning that he tested positive for the coronavirus. But questions remain about what exactly happened before and after — when the president was first diagnosed, started experiencing symptoms and exactly what treatment he received and when.

On Saturday, White House Physician Sean Conley, for example, told reporters Trump was 72 hours into his diagnosis, but then said in a memo later on that he meant to say three days. Conley refused to say whether Trump had ever received supplemental oxygen this week, and another doctor said Trump received treatment 48 hours ago — also quickly walked back by the White House.

Here’s what we know about what happened when:

Saturday

President Trump hosted a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden to announce his nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett.

Eight people who attended the ceremony, including the president, have since tested positive for the coronavirus.

Later that night, Trump flew to Pennsylvania for an outdoor rally. Hope Hicks, one of Trump’s closest aides who would later test positive for the coronavirus, accompanied the president.

Tuesday

President Trump attended the presidential debate in Cleveland. Members of the Trump family and other guests of the president did not wear masks in the debate venue, despite being asked to by Cleveland Clinic staff.

Debate moderator Chris Wallace said on Fox yesterday that Trump wasn’t tested before attending the debate because he arrived late. They went on the honor system, he said.

Wednesday

Hope Hicks walk to Marine One to depart from the South Lawn of the White House on Wednesday.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Hope Hicks walk to Marine One to depart from the South Lawn of the White House on Wednesday.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Trump flew to Minnesota for a fundraiser and an outdoor rally.

Hope Hicks reportedly started to feel unwell and tried to isolate on the Air Force One ride back to Washington.

Based on Conley’s initial reference to 72 hours since the diagnosis, that would mean Trump was diagnosed mid-day on Wednesday.

The White House later walked Conley’s reference back, saying it had not been 72 hours since the president was diagnosed, saying Conley meant to say it was day 3 since the diagnosis.

Thursday

Hicks reportedly received a positive coronavirus test on Thursday. She had also traveled with the president on Tuesday and Wednesday.

That afternoon, Trump flew to New Jersey for an indoor fundraiser where few people wore masks.

At Saturday’s press conference, Dr. Brian Garibaldi said the president began an experimental

Nursing Home Inspectors In The D.C. Region Aren’t Required To Take COVID-19 Tests : NPR

Staff and vendors in nursing homes have to get regular COVID-19 tests. State nursing home inspectors don’t.

The National Guard/Flickr


hide caption

toggle caption

The National Guard/Flickr

Maryland, D.C. and Virginia are not mandating COVID-19 tests for the inspectors examining conditions in local nursing homes, public health spokespeople from all three jurisdictions confirmed. The lack of testing for the inspectors, nursing home leaders say, stands in contrast to state and federal testing requirements for nearly anyone entering a nursing home these days.

For the past several months, inspectors were focused on completing federally mandated infection control surveys to evaluate long term care facilities’ responses to the coronavirus pandemic. Some of the inspectors’ findings have resulted in citations and fines for nursing homes found to have inadequate screening, social distancing or sanitizing practices.

Nursing home leaders are worried that inspectors are entering facilities without knowing their COVID-19 status, said Allison Ciborowski, the president of LeadingAge Maryland, a long-term care industry group.

The inspectors work on behalf of the federal government’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services but are employed by state jurisdictions. Ciborowski said CMS hasn’t required or recommended that inspectors be tested. Maryland, Virginia and the District have chosen to follow that lead.

“It’s a concern for our members just because they are really trying to carefully track the spread of the virus,” she told WAMU/DCist. “It seems strange that the agency that is citing nursing homes if they’re not appropriately testing staff is not testing the surveyors that are going in to fight those kinds of things.”

Inspectors may not be required to undergo coronavirus testing, but almost everyone else going in and out of nursing homes is. CMS and state governments regulate how frequently long-term care facilities should be testing staff, residents and regular outside visitors. For much of the summer, CMS required nursing home staff to be tested for COVID-19 every week (in Maryland, weekly testing is still the case).

When inspectors enter facilities, they are expected to comply with temperature checks, answer screening questions, and wear masks, gloves and gowns. Once inside, they walk around the facility, but do not enter sick resident rooms.

Last month, CMS revised its testing guidance, tying the frequency of staff testing to the positivity rate of the county where the nursing home is located. The definition of who counts as staff is still broad: it includes “employees, consultants, contractors, volunteers and caregivers who provide care and services to residents on behalf of the facility, and students in the facility’s nurse aide training programs or from affiliated academic institutions,” according to the guidance.

Missing from that long cast of characters: inspectors. And while fewer than half of all states are requiring inspectors to get tested despite the omission in CMS guidelines, Maryland, Virginia and D.C. are not.

Spokespeople for the Maryland Department of Health, Virginia Department of Health and D.C. Health pointed to a number of reasons for not requiring tests. Virginia Department of Health spokeswoman Tammie Smith emailed the following