Showing: 1 - 10 of 21 RESULTS

Trump tests negative for COVID-19, is not infectious

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump has tested negative for COVID-19 and he is not infectious to others, the White House physician said on Monday, 10 days after Trump announced he had contracted the coronavirus.

In a memo released by the White House just hours before Trump was due to resume holding campaign rallies, Dr. Sean Conley said the president had tested negative on consecutive days using an Abbott Laboratories <ABT.N> BinaxNOW antigen card.

Conley said the negative tests and other clinical and laboratory data “indicate a lack of detectable viral replication.”

Trump’s medical team had determined that based on the data and guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “the president is not infectious to others,” Conley said.

Trump returns to the campaign trail on Monday night with a rally in Sanford, Florida, his first since he disclosed on Oct. 2 that he tested positive for COVID-19.

Critics fault Trump for failing to encourage supporters at campaign events, and even White House staff, to wear protective masks and abide by social-distancing guidelines. At least 11 close Trump aides have tested positive for the coronavirus.

(Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by Chris Reese and Bill Berkrot)

Source Article

Trump Holds Florida Rally After White House Physician Reports Negative COVID-19 Tests

On Monday, White House physician Sean Conley said that President Trump had registered consecutive days in which he’s tested negative for COVID-19. The news came on the same date that Trump headed to a packed campaign rally in Sanford, Florida. 

“In response to your inquiry regarding the President’s most recent COVID-19 tests, I can share with you that he has tested NEGATIVE, on consecutive days, using the Abbott BinaxNOW antigen card,” said Conley. He added that those tests occurred “in context with additional clinical and laboratory data.”

Speaking of this data, Conley wrote that it was made up of “viral load, subgenomic RNA and PCR cycle threshold measurements, as well as ongoing assessment of viral culture data.”

The letter concluded that the president is “not infectious to others,” which echoes a similar message that Conley issued on Saturday. He also stated, on Saturday, that the president is cleared for an “active schedule.” 

CNN adds that it’s not clear what consecutive days Trump tested positive, while also noting that the Abbott BinaxNOW test he reportedly took may lack precision, as it’s only proven accurate in people being tested within the first week of their symptoms starting to show. The FDA has also said they’re not certain of how accurate Abbott BinaxNOW results are. 

Trump’s positive test was first announced on Thursday, October 1. The White House has not said when the president last tested negative prior to that announcement. 

As for that aforementioned rally, a large crowd gathered for the event. The campaign was issuing temperature checks and distributed masks/hand sanitizer, but social distancing remained absent. 

Trump also claimed to be “immune” and offered to kiss anyone in the crowd daring enough to chance it:

On a related note, this all comes on the same day that Dr. Anthony Fauci said that holding large rallies “was asking for trouble” due to the virus’s surge in several states. 

“We know that that is asking for trouble when you do that,” Fauci said of Trump’s decision to re-up a full campaign rallying schedule, according to The New York Times. “We’ve seen that when you have situations of congregate settings where there are

Trump doctor says president ‘has tested negative’ for COVID-19 on consecutive days, won’t reveal when

President Donald Trump tested negative for COVID-19 at some point in the “recent” past, his personal doctor said Monday, though he didn’t specify what that meant.

Dr. Sean Conley, the White House doctor who has continued to offer misleading or incomplete information about Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis, offered the latest confusing update in a memo released shortly before the president was set to hold an evening campaign rally in Florida.

“In response to your inquiry regarding the president’s most recent COVID-19 tests, I can share with you that he has tested NEGATIVE, on consecutive days,” Conley wrote in the memo.

A White House spokesman did not return a request for clarity.

Conley wrote in the memo that Trump’s negative results came back using the so-called “Abbott BinaxNOW antigen card” — a rapid test known to not be as accurate as more sensitive swab tests.

However, Conley said the team of White House physicians also relied on “clinical and laboratory data” in assessing that “the president is not infectious to others.”

Since Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Oct. 1, Conley and White House officials have refused to say when he took his last negative test.

The obfuscation has raised concern that Trump could still be contagious.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says COVID-19 patients who experience severe symptoms — which Trump did — can be contagious for “up to 20 days.”

Nonetheless, Trump was not wearing a face mask as he boarded Air Force One on Monday afternoon for a rally in Sanford, Florida — his first public campaign event since being diagnosed with the virus that’s killed more than 215,000 Americans.

———

©2020 New York Daily News

Visit New York Daily News at www.nydailynews.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Source Article

Trump tells supporters he’s ‘tested totally negative’ for coronavirus

President Trump on Sunday said in a phone call to a group of supporters that he’s “tested totally negative” for the novel coronavirus, despite White House physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, releasing no new statements on the president’s health.

“I’ve been tested totally negative,” Trump said in an audio message his campaign posted on YouTube. “I’m going to be out in Florida tomorrow, working very hard because this is an election we have to win.”

Despite Trump’s claim that he has tested negative for the virus, the White House has not released any information since Conley sent out a memo on Saturday saying the president was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus. Conley did not, however, say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it.

A person can be symptom free and not be a risk of transmitting the virus to others and yet can still have the coronavirus in their system.

LIVE UPDATES: 2020 PRESIDENTIAL RACE: TRUMP PREPARES TO RETURN TO CAMPAIGN TRAIL

The president’s comments to supporters came just hours after trump spoke on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” where he told host Maria Bartiromo that he was “immune” from the virus.

“I’m immune,” Trump said.” “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

While survivors of most viruses develop antibodies that guard them against becoming infected by the disease again, researches are still unclear if this is the case with COVID-19. Viruses can also mutate and cause individuals to become infected with another strain of the virus, as was the case with the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic.

Researchers at Harvard recently discovered that COVID-19 patients may be protected against reinfection for up to four months.

While there’s evidence that reinfection is unlikely for at least three months even for those with a mild case of COVID-19, very few diseases leave people completely immune for life. Antibodies are only one piece of the body’s defenses, and they naturally wane over time.

“Certainly it’s presumptuous to say it’s a lifetime,” said Dr. Albert Ko, an infectious disease specialist and department chairman at the Yale School of Public Health.

As to whether Trump could still be contagious, Ko said the White House appeared to be following CDC guidelines for when it is appropriate to end isolation after mild to moderate cases of COVID-19.

TRUMP SAYS HE’S ‘MEDICATION FREE,’ DETAILS COVID-19 RECOVERY IN FIRST ON-CAMERA INTERVIEW SINCE DIAGNOSIS

But Ko cautioned that those who have had severe cases of the diseases should isolate for 20 days. He noted that Trump was treated with the steroid dexamethasone, which is normally reserved for patients with severe COVID.

Some medical experts have been skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early in the course of his illness. Just 10 days since an initial diagnosis of infection, there was no way to know for certain that someone was no longer contagious, they said.

His return to full-fledged rallies will be in

Why don’t you need a negative coronavirus test to leave isolation?

President Donald Trump’s doctor on Saturday said Trump has met criteria from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to leave isolation after falling sick with the coronavirus.



a man wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump walks to Marine One prior to departure from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, October 2, 2020, as he heads to Walter Reed Military Medical Center, after testing positive for Covid-19. - President Donald Trump will spend the coming days in a military hospital just outside Washington to undergo treatment for the coronavirus, but will continue to work, the White House said Friday (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)


© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump walks to Marine One prior to departure from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, October 2, 2020, as he heads to Walter Reed Military Medical Center, after testing positive for Covid-19. – President Donald Trump will spend the coming days in a military hospital just outside Washington to undergo treatment for the coronavirus, but will continue to work, the White House said Friday (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

The White House didn’t say Trump had actually tested negative for the virus — but according to CDC guidelines, people don’t generally need a negative test to be around people again.

Here’s why:

People can test positive even if no longer infectious

Earlier in the pandemic, health officials said people should have two negative tests for coronavirus — taken 24 hours apart — before being around people again. That forced some people into isolation for weeks on end.

But coronavirus tests can’t necessarily determine whether someone is infectious. PCR tests, for example, just look for pieces of genetic material called RNA — and that can linger long after someone has recovered.

According to the CDC, research has shown that people aren’t likely to be infectious 10 to 20 days after symptoms first began, regardless of test results.

To figure that out, scientists have taken samples from coronavirus patients and tried to infect living cells. Even though PCR tests can come back positive, people don’t tend to be infectious after that 10- to 20-day window has passed.

Think of it this way: A PCR test is looking for the blueprint of the virus — its “genome” — and not for the virus itself. In fact, the test is just looking for fragments of that blueprint.

It’s like a recipe for chocolate cake; finding the recipe in someone’s kitchen doesn’t mean you’ll find a cake.

Why might Trump not need to isolate for 20 days?

People with mild to moderate Covid-19 are thought to remain infectious “no longer than 10 days after symptom onset,” according to the CDC.

For patients with severe Covid-19, the CDC says up to 20 days of isolation “may be warranted.” But the agency’s recommendations only require 10 days. “Consider consultation with infection control experts,” the CDC’s recommendations say.

The President’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, released a memo Saturday that referenced “advanced diagnostic tests” and stated “there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus” from Trump.

Still, the letter didn’t fully describe those advanced diagnostic tests or their exact findings.

The President’s doctor said Trump had undetectable “subgenomic mRNA.” Those are molecules produced when viruses replicate. Their absence may suggest Trump is no longer shedding live virus.

But Conley did not detail what “advanced diagnostic tests” the President had

Trump says he’s ‘immune’ to COVID. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from COVID-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, COVID-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in August that a Hong Kong man had been infected with the virus for a second time, suggesting that immunity may be short-lasting for at least some patients.

Trump spoke hours after his physician said in a letter Saturday that Trump is no longer considered a transmission risk and can now be around others safely.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo. “Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule.”

Conley added that Trump has “decreasing viral loads,” meaning a lessening of how much virus is present in any sample taken from a patient.

But Conley, who had earlier this month admitted he was providing a rosier outlook on the president’s condition to convey an “upbeat” picture, did not say whether Trump has recently tested negative for the virus, nor did he indicate when Trump’s last negative test was.

Trump, his staff and medical team have repeatedly refused to provide specifics about his testing regime. Pressed by reporters last week, Conley said, “I don’t want to go backwards.”

Saturday’s letter also did not address Trump’s treatment protocol.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that those stricken with the virus isolate themselves for at least 10 days following the onset of symptoms — with those suffering from more severe cases needing to isolate for up to 20 days. Trump first reported symptoms 10 days ago.

The president’s treatment included a strong steroid, dexamethasone, as well as an antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron. He required supplemental oxygen on two occasions after experiencing symptoms, according to his medical team.

Trump is set to return to the campaign trail Monday for a Florida rally before visiting Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week. On Saturday, the president held his first public event at the White House since his diagnosis.

“It is disappearing,” Trump said of the coronavirus as cases

Trump declares himself ‘immune’ to Covid-19. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative.

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from Covid-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, Covid-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in August that a Hong Kong man had been infected with the virus for a second time, suggesting that immunity may be short-lasting for at least some patients.

Trump spoke hours after his physician said in a letter Saturday that Trump is no longer considered a transmission risk and can now be around others safely.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo. “Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule.”

Conley added that Trump has “decreasing viral loads,” meaning a lessening of how much virus is present in any sample taken from a patient.

But Conley, who had earlier this month admitted he was providing a rosier outlook on the president’s condition to convey an “upbeat” picture, did not say whether Trump has recently tested negative for the virus, nor did he indicate when Trump’s last negative test was.

Trump, his staff and medical team have repeatedly refused to provide specifics about his testing regime. Pressed by reporters last week, Conley said, “I don’t want to go backwards.”

Saturday’s letter also did not address Trump’s treatment protocol.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that those stricken with the virus isolate themselves for at least 10 days following the onset of symptoms — with those suffering from more severe cases needing to isolate for up to 20 days. Trump first reported symptoms 10 days ago.

The president’s treatment included a strong steroid, dexamethasone, as well as an antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron. He required supplemental oxygen on two occasions after experiencing symptoms, according to his medical team.

Trump is set to return to the campaign trail Monday for a Florida rally before visiting Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week. On Saturday, the president held his first public event at the White House since his diagnosis.

“It is disappearing,” Trump said of the coronavirus as cases

Hours after Trump’s dark and divisive White House speech, his doctor still won’t say if he’s tested negative

Seven hours after a defiant President Donald Trump resumed public events Saturday with a divisive speech from a White House balcony in front of hundreds of guests, his doctor released a memo clearing him to return to an active schedule.



President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Alex Brandon/AP
President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump’s Saturday event, which featured little social distancing, came just two weeks after a large White House gathering that has since been called “a superpreader event” and potentially put lives at risk once again, just nine days after the President revealed his own Covid-19 diagnosis.

The latest memo from Trump’s physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, said that the President has met US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for “the safe discontinuation of isolation.” But it does not say Trump has received a negative coronavirus test since first testing positive for the virus, although that is not a criteria for clearing isolation, according to the CDC.



a group of people that are standing in the grass: Judge Amy Coney Barrett walks to the microphone after President Donald Trump, right, announced Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Alex Brandon/AP
Judge Amy Coney Barrett walks to the microphone after President Donald Trump, right, announced Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” the memo from Conley reads in part.

Loading...

Load Error

That’s welcome news for Trump, who’s been itching to return to the campaign trail and has already planned three rallies for next week.

But the memo’s opacity, the inability for reporters to question the doctor and the fact that the White House still will not say when Trump last tested negative before his positive diagnosis only adds to the confusion over his case, which Trump has been eager to distract from.

After being sidelined from the campaign trail for more than a week, Trump leaned into his law-and-order message in a speech threaded with falsehoods on Saturday that was clearly a campaign rally disguised as a White House event.

Trump claimed that if the left gains power, they’ll launch a crusade against law enforcement. Echoing his highly inaccurate campaign ads that suggest that Democratic nominee Joe Biden would defund 911 operations and have a “therapist” answer calls about crime, Trump falsely claimed that the left is focused on taking away firearms, funds and authority from police.

With just three weeks to go until an election in which he’s trailing badly in the polls, and millions of voters already voting, Trump is deploying familiar scare tactics.

Biden has not made any proposals that would affect the ability to answer 911 calls. As CNN’s Facts First has noted many times, Biden has repeatedly and explicitly opposed the idea of “defunding the

Rep. Hayes tests negative for virus, 3 weeks after diagnosis

WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) — U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes said a test Saturday showed no signs of the coronavirus in her body, nearly three weeks after she was diagnosed with COVID-19.

The Democrat, who represents Connecticut’s 5th District, has been documenting her battle against the disease on social media since revealing her positive test results on Sept. 20.

“Tossed and turned most of the night,” she posted on Sept. 21. “Breathing is so labored.”

Hayes said a follow-up COVID-19 test on Saturday came back negative. She said she also received a flu shot and made an appointment with the American Red Cross to donate plasma.


“We can all do our part to keep our community safe,” she tweeted Saturday in a post followed by three mask-wearing emojis and the hashtag “#HealthyATHome.”

In other coronavirus related news:

___

RAPID TESTS

Sacred Heart University and the University of Saint Joseph are the latest in Connecticut to use the rapid saliva-based coronavirus test developed at Yale.

The schools hope adding the testing method to tests already being conducted will help them identify cases earlier and prevent large outbreaks on campus. Both schools also are using the nasal swab form of testing.

“Over the last few weeks as we saw upticks of positive cases on other campuses we decided to increase the percentage of students tested each week and we also wanted more rapid results,” University of Saint Joseph President Rhona Free said in a statement. “SalivaDirect was able to complete the new level of testing that we needed with quick results.”

Sacred Heart spokesperson Deb Noack said the 900 saliva tests they plan to due each week will augment the 1,300 nasal swab tests that had already been conducted.

Source Article

Newborn Tests Negative After First-Time Mother Gets COVID-19 Ahead of Due Date

A baby in California tested negative for COVID-19 after her mother contracted the disease ahead of the birth earlier this year.



The child’s mother, Rachel Collette, opened up about the “emotional rollercoaster” she endured after contracting the infectious respiratory illness roughly six months ago -- as coronavirus outbreak was spreading globally.


© Anastasiia Chepinska/Unsplash
The child’s mother, Rachel Collette, opened up about the “emotional rollercoaster” she endured after contracting the infectious respiratory illness roughly six months ago — as coronavirus outbreak was spreading globally.

The child’s first-time mom, Rachel Collette, has now opened up about the “emotional rollercoaster” she endured after contracting the infectious respiratory illness roughly six months ago—as the ongoing coronavirus outbreak was spreading rapidly.

Collette revealed her personal experience after taking part in a University of California San Francisco (UCSF) study that found COVID-19 symptoms for pregnant people can be prolonged, lasting two months or longer for some participants.

In the days before giving birth to her daughter, Collette said her symptoms consisted of a dry cough, a sore throat and a headache. Luckily, she said those eventually subsided and her child had tested negative after being born at hospital.

“Definitely that whole week leading up to giving birth was an emotional rollercoaster. Because it was the end of March, beginning of April, there still wasn’t that much information, there were still so many unknowns,” Collette told KRON4.

According to data compiled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) there have been more than 25,300 cases of pregnant patients with COVID-19 in the U.C., logged between January 22 and October 6. Of that number, over 5,899 people were hospitalized. It is estimated at least 44 pregnant patients have died.

These Tips Can Help You Combat Coronavirus And Protect Others

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The CDC noted one study suggested pregnant people with COVID-19 are more likely to be hospitalized or need mechanical ventilation than nonpregnant people, but it warned the “risk of death is similar for both groups [and] much remains unknown.”

Speaking to KRON, Collette said her daughter, who is six months old, is healthy. Collette was one of 594 women who shared her insights with the academic study this year, the largest to date analyzing COVID-19 among non-hospitalized pregnant women.

The findings, now published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, suggested the most common early symptoms for pregnant women were cough, sore throat, body aches and fever.

It said half of the participants still reported COVID-19 symptoms after three weeks and approximately 25 percent appeared to still show symptoms after eight weeks.

“We found that pregnant people [who have] COVID-19 can expect a prolonged time with symptoms,” senior author Vanessa Jacoby, UCSF vice chair of research in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, wrote in the report.

The project—officially known as the Pregnancy Coronavirus Outcomes Registry—is now ongoing in the U.S., where the virus is still circulating. It was launched March 22.

It has found a loss of taste or smell was the first symptom in six percent of the pregnant women, while 60 percent of women had no symptoms after four weeks of illness.

“The majority of participants in