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Walgreens Launches Find Rx Coverage Advisor to Help Customers Navigate Health Coverage Options

Find Rx Coverage Advisor builds on Walgreens efforts to support patients in maintaining affordable access to medications as health insurance shifts for many

At a time when millions of Americans face unemployment and the loss of health insurance, Walgreens has launched Find Rx Coverage Advisor, a new resource providing personalized guidance to customers seeking information on available health and prescription drug coverage options. With Medicare Part D and individual marketplace open enrollment approaching, Find Rx Coverage Advisor connects eligible customers directly to health plan partners who can assist with questions about enrollment.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005277/en/

Walgreens Launches Find Rx Coverage Advisor to Help Customers Navigate Health Coverage Options (Photo: Business Wire)

“Shifts in health insurance coverage because of job loss, life events or as you qualify for Medicare Part D can be a complicated maze of options,” said Rick Gates, senior vice president of pharmacy, Walgreens. “As champions of patient choice and prescription affordability, Walgreens collaborates with and accepts a wide range of health plans and benefits. This allows us to provide our customers with trusted resources to help find the right health insurance option for them.”

Customers can access a personalized report from Find Rx Coverage Advisor by answering a few questions to identify health coverage options. Results include available health plans in their area, including Medicaid, marketplace health plans, Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D plans, as well as additional prescription savings resources based on the information provided. In the next month, reports can be emailed to customers for additional research or follow-up needs.

The launch of Find Rx Coverage Advisor builds on Walgreens efforts to support patients in maintaining access to medications. Earlier this year, Walgreens announced lower prices on hundreds of medications available through the company’s Prescription Savings Club, which offers savings of up to 80 percent off cash retail prices to all customers on thousands of medications.* Anyone can join the Walgreens Prescription Savings Club for an annual fee of $20 per individual or $35 per family. Customers can search for savings on medications through the Prescription Savings Club look up tool, and will now also save over 20 percent off the cash retail price for flu shots, where the Prescription Savings Club is available.

Members of Walgreens Prescription Savings Club have saved over $164 million off the cash retail price on prescriptions and immunizations since relaunching the program nationwide.* This adds to a number of efforts to ensure patients have access to affordable medications and health services prior to and throughout the COVID-19 pandemic including:

  • Expanding services like 90-day refills, early refill authorizations and waiving fees for one-to-two day delivery on eligible prescriptions during shelter-in-place orders.

  • Saving qualifying patients $375 million in out-of-pocket costs on medications since the beginning of the year by connecting patients with prescription assistance programs and manufacturer coupons.

  • Providing 200,000 flu vouchers for immunizations at no cost to those in need during the upcoming flu season.

  • Partnering with manufacturers to

This is What it’s Like to Navigate Healthcare While Black

We still have a long way to go before Black people receive the medical care they need.

This is Race and Medicine, a series dedicated to unearthing the uncomfortable and sometimes life-threatening truth about racism in healthcare. By highlighting the experiences of Black people and honoring their health journeys, we look to a future where medical racism is a thing of the past.


As a dark-skinned and sometimes sensitive little Black girl, I could never shake the feeling from my bones that my pain might be viewed as inconsequential to the very people who were supposed to provide medical care to me. It’s still something I have trouble reconciling.

With the legacy of medical racism dating back to antebellum America, it’s no surprise that Black patients seeking treatment today are still mistrustful, cautious, and protective.

As a child, I remember watching movies about how the U.S. Department of Public Health experimented on Black war veterans by withholding syphilis treatment without informed consent.

Later, I learned about white doctors testing the first gynecological instruments on enslaved Black women without anesthesia and using Black cells for groundbreaking HeLa cancer research without consent.

I sat down to talk to Black patients of all ages about their racist experiences in healthcare. Some of them wish to remain anonymous due to the stigma of openly discussing mental health, while others work in the healthcare industry and fear professional backlash.

Here are their stories.

“Maya,” 38, works as a doctor and has experienced racism among her colleagues and as a patient. Due to the professional risk of speaking out, she asked that her name be changed.

Maya’s experiences with racism in healthcare began as she looked for a job after her residency ended. Maya asked for a recommendation from the lead doctor she had worked with for 3 years and got a yes.

Once Maya got the job, which was a per diem temporary position, the woman who hired her let her know that her reference might not be ideal.

The lead doctor had said, “Well, Maya is not a go-getter.”

The woman hiring asked, “What do you mean? Is she smart? Does she know what she’s doing? Does she work hard?”

The lead doctor said yes, and Maya was hired.

The second doctor in the residency, a Black male, applied for a per diem job at the same clinic where the residency took place. The lead doctor wanted him to interview, even though she worked side by side with him for 3 years.

While she reluctantly recommended Maya and required the other Black doctor to interview, the same doctor went out of her way to create a job for the third resident, a white male medical student.

Per diem jobs are temporary, have no guaranteed hours, and benefits are rarely provided. It’s difficult to secure stable income, and many providers have to work multiple jobs just to make ends meet.

Like Maya, Black residents and doctors already exist at the margins of their field.

In