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Maggie Smith, Author Of ‘Keep Moving’ : NPR

Keep Moving, by Maggie Smith

Atria/One Signal Publishers


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Atria/One Signal Publishers

Have you ever had this experience? You were having the most awful, terrible day and a stranger does something kind, and it nearly brings you to tears.

Maybe they wave you on instead of honking when you cut them off in traffic. Or maybe you get to the front of the coffee line to find the guy in front of you already paid for your drink.

And in the midst of your total misery, this total stranger has done you a good turn. And it means the world. Reading Maggie Smith’s new book Keep Moving feels kind of like that. It is a meditation on kindness and hope, and how to move forward through grief.

Smith says she started writing the book as her marriage was ending. “Keep Moving began as sort of ‘notes to self’ that I wrote for myself each day to pep-talk myself through this really dark time. And I posted them on Twitter as a way to hold myself accountable and to sort of share my struggle with others. And a couple of surprising things happened because of those tweets. I found my way into a new kind of optimism that I hadn’t experienced before, and I found that the posts were really meeting people where they were in their lives at that time, too.”

Interview Highlights

On writing the book she needed to read herself

Other people can tell you, in hard times, “You’re going to be fine.” But if you’re not telling yourself that, sometimes it’s hard to believe. And I think one of the things I realized when writing this book is the most important conversation that you have each day is the one you have with yourself. And if that’s not a kind and gentle, sort of brave-making conversation, then what other people are telling us sort of slips off of us.

On trusting that the present moment has something to teach you

I think in some ways this really summarizes what what I was trying to do with the book, which is to think about reimagining my life at a time where I thought it was over. You know, it felt like a catastrophic change. If I imagined a Venn diagram of emotions, I think my feelings was sort of that spot where fear and sadness and anger and confusion overlap. It’s not a good Venn diagram … And I think we are all feeling a lot of that now because of the pandemic, because of so much unrest in this country and in the world. And we have to think about, not the life that we had last year, but thinking about what the life we have now still offers us, and what is still possible

Trump, moving to show strength, aims for Monday release

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Donald Trump was hoping for a Monday discharge from the military hospital where he is being treated for COVID-19, a day after he briefly ventured out while contagious to salute cheering supporters by motorcade in a move that disregarded precautions meant to contain the deadly virus that has killed more than 209,000 Americans.

White House officials said Trump was anxious to be released after three nights at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where doctors revealed on Sunday that his blood oxygen level dropped suddenly twice in recent days and that they gave him a steroid typically only recommended for the very sick. Still, the doctors said Trump’s health is improving and volunteered that he could be discharged as early as Monday to continue the remainder of his treatment at the White House.

“This is an important day as the president continues to improve and is ready to get back to a normal work schedule,” White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told Fox News on Monday. He said the determination on whether Trump would leave the hospital won’t be made until later in the day after the president is evaluated by his medical team, but that Trump was “optimistic” he could be released Monday.

Less than one month until Election Day, Trump was eager to project strength despite his illness. The still-infectious president surprised supporters who had gathered outside the hospital, driving by in a black SUV with the windows rolled up. Secret Service agents inside the vehicle could be seen in masks and other protective gear.

The move capped a weekend of contradictions that fueled confusion about Trump’s health, which has imperiled the leadership of the U.S. government and upended the final stages of the presidential campaign. While Trump’s physician offered a rosy prognosis on his condition, his briefings lacked basic information, including the findings of lung scans, or were quickly muddled by more serious assessments of the president’s health by other officials.


In a short video released by the White House on Sunday, Trump insisted he understood the gravity of the moment. But his actions moments later, by leaving the hospital and sitting inside the SUV with others, suggested otherwise.

“This is insanity,” Dr. James P. Phillips, an attending physician at Walter Reed who is a critic of Trump and his handling of the pandemic. “Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days. They might get sick. They may die.”

White House spokesman Judd Deere said Trump’s trip outside the hospital “was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.” He added that precautions were taken, including using personal protective equipment, to protect Trump as well as White House officials and Secret Service agents.

Joe Biden’s campaign, meanwhile, said the Democratic presidential nominee again tested negative for coronavirus Sunday. The results come five days after Biden spent more than 90 minutes on the debate stage with Trump. Biden,

Wellington virtual Zumba class keeps students moving, hoping

Kristina Webb
 
| Palm Beach Post

WELLINGTON — Elyse Beras’ relationship with Zumba did not start out well.

The Wellington resident’s first try at the fitness class, which combines aerobics and Latin dance, fell flat. The instructor just wasn’t engaging.

Then Beras found Jamie Tizol. 

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The effervescent Zumba instructor drew Beras into the high-energy workouts — something Tizol continues to do with new students, now in a virtual format using the Zoom video conferencing platform, prompted by the coronavirus pandemic.

“She makes every individual feel, ‘You can do it with me, and I’m going to show you how,’” Beras said.

Tizol has earned praise from her students at the Wellington Community Center, with people heaping acclaim on the 43-year-old instructor for her engaging personality and skill as an instructor.

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But something else about Tizol’s virtual classes is getting the attention of Wellington residents. 

When Tizol moved from her physical classroom at the community center to a virtual classroom using the Zoom video conferencing platform, it opened up an opportunity for her dedicated students, like Beras, to share the classes with friends and family around the country.

It’s helped them connect, stay in touch and see each other in a fun setting each week, Beras said.

“She could get a person that’s dying up to dance,” she said.

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Tizol joined Wellington’s slate of community center instructors in 2016. She teaches four virtual classes: Zumba, Zumba Gold for people age 55 and older, Zumba Gold chair for people who may not be as mobile, and Zumba Toning, which incorporates a small amount of weight.

Moving from in-person classes to Zoom was “seamless” for Tizol, said Jenifer Brito, Wellington’s Community Services specialist, who organizes and directs senior programs. 

“We’re so lucky to have her,” Brito said. 

With 20 to 35 people per class, Tizol still finds a way to make each class personal for her students, Brito said. 

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“She really loves what she does, and it really shines through,” she said.

Wellington has received a flood of calls from grateful students over the past few weeks, Brito said.

“She’s bringing family members together during this time,” she said. “That’s special.”

For Tizol, each class is a gift. 

“I look forward to it every day, to see their smiling faces,” she said.

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Tizol began teaching Zumba about 15 years ago while living in Virginia. Growing up, she had a passion for dancing and music, and when a friend introduced her to the lively workouts, she fell in love. 

When she and her family moved from Virginia to Wellington six years ago, she had to start fresh with a new group of students. 

It was fate that she met Mary Ann