Showing: 1 - 2 of 2 RESULTS

Newborn Tests Negative After First-Time Mother Gets COVID-19 Ahead of Due Date

A baby in California tested negative for COVID-19 after her mother contracted the disease ahead of the birth earlier this year.



The child’s mother, Rachel Collette, opened up about the “emotional rollercoaster” she endured after contracting the infectious respiratory illness roughly six months ago -- as coronavirus outbreak was spreading globally.


© Anastasiia Chepinska/Unsplash
The child’s mother, Rachel Collette, opened up about the “emotional rollercoaster” she endured after contracting the infectious respiratory illness roughly six months ago — as coronavirus outbreak was spreading globally.

The child’s first-time mom, Rachel Collette, has now opened up about the “emotional rollercoaster” she endured after contracting the infectious respiratory illness roughly six months ago—as the ongoing coronavirus outbreak was spreading rapidly.

Collette revealed her personal experience after taking part in a University of California San Francisco (UCSF) study that found COVID-19 symptoms for pregnant people can be prolonged, lasting two months or longer for some participants.

In the days before giving birth to her daughter, Collette said her symptoms consisted of a dry cough, a sore throat and a headache. Luckily, she said those eventually subsided and her child had tested negative after being born at hospital.

“Definitely that whole week leading up to giving birth was an emotional rollercoaster. Because it was the end of March, beginning of April, there still wasn’t that much information, there were still so many unknowns,” Collette told KRON4.

According to data compiled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) there have been more than 25,300 cases of pregnant patients with COVID-19 in the U.C., logged between January 22 and October 6. Of that number, over 5,899 people were hospitalized. It is estimated at least 44 pregnant patients have died.

These Tips Can Help You Combat Coronavirus And Protect Others

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The CDC noted one study suggested pregnant people with COVID-19 are more likely to be hospitalized or need mechanical ventilation than nonpregnant people, but it warned the “risk of death is similar for both groups [and] much remains unknown.”

Speaking to KRON, Collette said her daughter, who is six months old, is healthy. Collette was one of 594 women who shared her insights with the academic study this year, the largest to date analyzing COVID-19 among non-hospitalized pregnant women.

The findings, now published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, suggested the most common early symptoms for pregnant women were cough, sore throat, body aches and fever.

It said half of the participants still reported COVID-19 symptoms after three weeks and approximately 25 percent appeared to still show symptoms after eight weeks.

“We found that pregnant people [who have] COVID-19 can expect a prolonged time with symptoms,” senior author Vanessa Jacoby, UCSF vice chair of research in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, wrote in the report.

The project—officially known as the Pregnancy Coronavirus Outcomes Registry—is now ongoing in the U.S., where the virus is still circulating. It was launched March 22.

It has found a loss of taste or smell was the first symptom in six percent of the pregnant women, while 60 percent of women had no symptoms after four weeks of illness.

“The majority of participants in

Former nurse and patient advocate is looking for a kidney. Now the mother of 4 has to advocate for herself

CHICAGO — Registered nurse Christine Hernandez was just entering her 40s when she asked her doctors about her kidney function.



a person sitting on a table: Christine Hernandez preps herself for dialysis at her home Sept. 18, 2020, in Chicago, Ill. Hernandez, a registered nurse, is suffering from stage 5 kidney failure. She has set up her sunroom as a "hemo center," where she performs all of the duties necessary for her dialysis.


© Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Christine Hernandez preps herself for dialysis at her home Sept. 18, 2020, in Chicago, Ill. Hernandez, a registered nurse, is suffering from stage 5 kidney failure. She has set up her sunroom as a “hemo center,” where she performs all of the duties necessary for her dialysis.

Knowing she had two brothers with kidney disease, she asked her primary care physician for a referral to a nephrologist.

Hernandez recalls her doctor saying that her kidney lab results were good, and there was no reason she should see a nephrologist. But Hernandez, a Chicago mother of four, said she had a feeling she had kidney disease too.

The referral was given, and the nephrologist biopsied her kidneys in 2016. Her kidneys were operating at only 30% of capacity, and that was without having symptoms, she said.

“I was just flabbergasted,” she said. “I cried. All these things went through my head really fast: I was like, ‘I have little kids. What’s going to happen to them? I’m a nurse; I’m supposed to help people. What’s going to happen to my career?’ I was in fight or flight mode — trying to figure out how could I fix it because in the medical field you could fix everything, right?

“Well, you can fix everything but a kidney. I asked my nephrologist if we can put a stent inside my kidney to open up, so it could get blood flow through it, and he says it’s too late for that.”

Hernandez was diagnosed with medullary cystic kidney disease, an inherited condition that ends in kidney failure. In Hernandez’s case, the condition resulted in her arteries atrophying. Her doctor recommended going on a strict diet and seeing a nephrologist often. But eventually she would need dialysis and a transplant. In a matter of four years, Hernandez says her condition has progressed pretty fast. She went from 10-hour days advocating for patients in hospitals to spending almost eight hours a day four days a week preparing, using and breaking down her home hemodialysis device, which purifies her blood. She’s on three different regional transplant lists around the country and hopes to add more. She’s also seeking a donor on her own via Facebook. Her family’s history of kidney disease prevents a relative from donating, she said.

“I’m just fighting for my life,” Hernandez said. “I’m trying to get my life back and live for my kids and go back to nursing, believe it or not. A lot of nurses are like, ‘Oh, with your condition, nurses would retire.’ But I’m not your average nurse. I want to go back and pay it forward; I want to help people.”

Hernandez, who worked with high-risk moms and babies at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit at Mount Sinai Hospital, will tell her story to a virtual audience Oct.