Showing: 1 - 8 of 8 RESULTS

COVID-19 virus can survive on some surfaces for nearly a month in lab conditions

The virus that causes COVID-19 can survive for nearly a month in cooler, dark conditions on some nonporous surfaces such as glass and money in controlled laboratory conditions, according to a study published Monday that notes that the primary source of spread still appears to be through airborne aerosols and droplets caused by talking, singing, breathing or laughing.

The study, completed by experts at the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness, and published in “Virology Journal,” found that the virus was detectable after 28 days on surfaces such as glass, stainless steel, paper and polymer banknotes in lab experiments at room temperature — 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

The authors of the study wrote that the findings are important because phones, ATMS and other high-touch surfaces may not be regularly cleaned and therefore pose risks for transmission.

The experts concluded that surface or “fomite” transmission could play some role in the spread of COVID-19, though the degree is unknown.

“While the primary spread of SARS-CoV-2 appears to be via aerosols and respiratory droplets, fomites may also be an important contributor in transmission of the virus,” the authors wrote.

The study also found the virus is less likely to survive in higher temperatures, a finding confirmed by other studies.

At 86 degrees, the virus was detectable on most of those surfaces for only seven days but it was detected for 21 days on paper notes.

At 104 degrees, the virus was not detected past 48 hours for all surfaces tested.

“Temperature and humidity are both critical factors in viral survivability with an increase in either being detrimental to virus survival,” the authors wrote.

Other experts noted that studies that look at how long the virus can stay on various surfaces are tightly controlled and do not mirror real-life conditions. For example, the experiments in the Australian study were completed in the dark to negate any effects of UV light, which can kill COVID-19.

Previous studies have found virus on surfaces but did not determine whether it was live or inactive virus.

The new study, which looked at virus culture, showed the virus can be detectable and cultured after several days or weeks, which is “disconcerting,” said Peter Katona, chairman of the Infection Control Working Group at UCLA.

But it doesn’t answer whether the virus is still transmissible, he added.

“It’s a step in the right direction,” he said.

“Now we know that they’re viable virus particles. And that’s definitely a help but it doesn’t tell you how much you need to be significant. … The fact that virus on stainless steel is culturable in 28 days, does that mean in 28 days it was still transmissible? That’s the key question and this study did not answer that,” he said.

He added he wouldn’t use the study to inform real-world policies yet, and there’s not enough data to determine what role surface transmission plays in COVID-19 spread.

“We don’t understand that very well at all. We don’t know how important that is. We don’t know

Expect 20,000 more coronavirus deaths by the end of the month, former CDC director says

Another 20,000 Covid-19 deaths by the end of the month are “inevitable,” according to a former director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



a man standing in front of a building: Medical staff wearing full PPE push a stretcher with a deceased patient to a car outside of the Covid-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on June 30, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations have spiked since Texas reopened, pushing intensive-care wards to full capacity and sparking concerns about a surge in fatalities as the virus spreads. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)


© Go Nakamura/Getty Images
Medical staff wearing full PPE push a stretcher with a deceased patient to a car outside of the Covid-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on June 30, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations have spiked since Texas reopened, pushing intensive-care wards to full capacity and sparking concerns about a surge in fatalities as the virus spreads. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)

The estimate is based on the number of infections “that have already occurred,” Dr. Tom Frieden said Saturday, during CNN’s “Coronavirus: Facts and Fears” town hall.

The United States reported 57,420 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the highest number of new daily cases since August.

“Anytime we ignore, minimize or underestimate this virus, we do so at our peril and the peril of people whose lives depend on us,” Frieden said.

More than 7.7 million people have been infected with the virus in the US and 214,370 have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

By February, the coronavirus death toll in the US could double to about 400,000, a model from the from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington School of Medicine projected. Daily deaths will peak at about 23,000 in mid-January, the model predicted.

Projections aren’t set in stone, however, and what the public does can have a big impact, another former CDC director, Dr. Richard Besser, said.

Following guidance like wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and investigating cases means “we can have a very different trajectory and we can get this under control,” he said.

Impacts could be much greater than officials think

Officials are tracking coronavirus infections and deaths, but Frieden said those numbers may be too small.

The true number of coronavirus deaths in the United States is well over a quarter million, Frieden said Saturday.

Part of the problem in determining the true impact is how deaths are listed on death certificates, especially for older patients who are more likely to have other health problems along with a coronavirus infection. Often the other health condition is listed as the cause of death, he said.

“If you die from cancer, and you also have diabetes, you still died from cancer,” Frieden explained. “If you died from Covid, and you also had diabetes, you died from Covid.”

The number of infections is likely closer to 40 million people, he said.

“You may not get sick at all from this, but you may spread it to someone who then dies, or spreads it to someone else who dies,” he said. “That’s why we all have to recognize that we’re in this together. There’s only one enemy, and that’s the virus.”

Regaining trust in vaccines and health agencies

While researchers are racing to develop a coronavirus vaccine, health experts said Saturday that

PTCE Announces September ‘Faces of Pharmacy’ Winners in Recognition of American Pharmacists Month

Yearlong campaign recognizes pharmacists for their dedication, and often overlooked contributions, to transforming healthcare

In support of American Pharmacists Month in October, PTCE, a leader in continuing education for multispecialty pharmacists and pharmacy professionals, is committed to recognizing pharmacists’ contributions to health care practices and all they do for their communities through its ‘Faces of Pharmacy’ recognition program.

In this transforming health care landscape, The Faces of Pharmacy nomination opportunity celebrates pharmacists, who navigate evolving health care practices and continue to make a difference in the lives of their patients.

Continuing its year-long campaign, PTCE is proud to announce its September winners:

  • Alisa Eibling, Pharm.D., Clinical Director, PFSP Specialty Pharmacy

  • Adam King, MPH, CPhT, PR, Executive Director and founder, CompassionRx

  • Jameika Stuckey, Pharm.D., Clinical Supervisor and medication safety manager, University of Mississippi Medical Center

  • Michael Lorenzo Tinglin, Pharm.D., Clinical Pharmacist, Premier Family Medical

“Congratulations to the four pharmacy professionals who were selected as the winners of our Faces of Pharmacy program,” said Jim Palatine, R.Ph., MBA, president of PTCE. “The number of nominations we have received for the month of September truly exemplifies the need and desire to acknowledge these healthcare professionals who make a difference in the lives of their patients. In honor of American Pharmacists Month, we are devoted to showing our appreciation for the care and commitment of pharmacy professionals in the industry, and we will continue to recognize these professionals every month with our inaugural yearlong campaign.”

Each month, PTCE will select four pharmacy professionals to feature on its website and social media platforms in recognition of their unwavering commitment to delivering exceptional care to patients.

Nominations can be submitted online by colleagues, patients, friends and family members of outstanding pharmacists, pharmacy technicians or anyone else working in the industry. Submissions should detail what the nominee has done to ensure access to treatment and care or describe how they go above and beyond to support their patients or community.

For more information about the September Faces of Pharmacy winners, click here.

About Pharmacy Times Continuing Education™

Pharmacy Times Continuing Education™ (PTCE) is a leader in continuing education for retail, health system, oncology, managed care and specialty pharmacists. PTCE is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education (CPE). PTCE’s print, online and live CPE activities are designed to help improve the knowledge, competence and skills of pharmacists so they are better prepared to provide the highest quality pharmacy care to the patients they serve and to the physicians they assist as part of a multidisciplinary treatment/management team. To learn more about the educational activities sponsored by PTCE, visit https://www.pharmacytimes.org.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005978/en/

Contacts

PTCE
Alexandra Ventura, 609-716-7777
[email protected]

Source Article

CDC ensemble forecast forsees death toll from Covid-19 climbing to 233,000 by end of month

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention forecast that combines the data from dozens of independent models predicts US deaths from Covid-19 could reach 233,000 by the end of the month.



a man in a police car parked in a parking lot: People line up in their vehicles to undergo the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) tests, distributed by the Wisconsin National Guard at the United Migrant Opportunity Services center, as cases spread in the Midwest, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski


© Alex Wroblewski/Reuters
People line up in their vehicles to undergo the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) tests, distributed by the Wisconsin National Guard at the United Migrant Opportunity Services center, as cases spread in the Midwest, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski

“This week’s national ensemble forecast indicates an uncertain trend in new COVID-19 deaths reported over the next four weeks and predicts that 2,800 to 6,800 new deaths will likely be reported during the week ending October 31,” the CDC says on its website.

A prior ensemble forecast said there would be a total of 207,000 to 218,000 coronavirus deaths by the end of this week.

More than 212,000 Americans have already lost their lives to the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University.

But deaths in the US have been declining recently. A total of 4,869 people in the US died from Covid-19 during in the first week of October, down 13% when compared to the first week of September (5,611 reported deaths).

New cases on the increase

Covid-19 cases are trending upward across the US, with only two states reporting a decline of cases compared to last week. And hospitalizations across the country have also begun to rise, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project.

Wisconsin health officials reported a record-high number of 141 new patients Wednesday, days after the state saw records in new Covid-19 cases and deaths. Gov. Tony Evers announced the state will open a field hospital in response to the surge in hospitalizations.

“We obviously hoped this day wouldn’t come but, unfortunately, Wisconsin is in a much different and more dire place today, and our health care systems are being overwhelmed,” Evers said.

Other state leaders say they’re not trailing far behind.

“Our hospitalization rates are surging and beginning to place a strain on our healthcare system (especially staffing),” Utah Lt. Gov Spencer Cox wrote on Twitter. “Sadly, we are now seeing increased fatalities. The Wisconsin announcement should be a sobering reminder as Utah isn’t far behind in infection rates.”

Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Wyoming have all seen record-high hospitalization numbers in the past days.

The uptick in Covid-19 patients comes as the US approaches winter with a daily Covid-19 base line that experts say is far too high. For the first time since August, the nation is averaging more than 44,000 new Covid-19 cases daily, according to data from Johns Hopkins University — an average that won’t help as the country enters what health officials say will be a challenging season.

More cases will mean more community spread, more hospitalizations and ultimately, more deaths, Dr. Anthony Fauci has said.

At least half of US states, scattered across the Midwest and Northeast, are reporting more new cases than the previous week, according to Johns

Parker University Celebrates National Chiropractic Health Month

The Week

Kamala Harris should make Mike Pence debate Christian values

Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate probably shouldn’t be happening. With coronavirus spreading quickly through the Trump administration, Mike Pence may pose a legitimate health risk to Kamala Harris and the debate’s moderator, USA Today’s Susan Page. Given those real dangers, the Commission on Presidential Debates has decided to move the candidates from standing seven to now 13 feet apart and has approved the installation of a plexiglass barrier between Harris and Pence. Pence’s team, as Politico reported on Monday, opposed the barrier. “If Sen. Harris wants to use a fortress around herself, have at it,” Pence’s spokeswoman, Katie Miller, mockingly responded to the decision.That response is completely in keeping with how dangerously this administration, especially Trump, has downplayed the pandemic, even at its own peril. Trump’s taunting of Biden at last week’s presidential debate for his mask wearing, we now know, came just hours before the president tested positive for the virus.Pence is unlikely to show such bluster on Wednesday night. While most of Trump world has used the president’s COVID-19 diagnosis to extravagantly extol his superhuman status and aggressively attack reporters asking legitimate questions about his condition, the sanctimonious Pence will likely take a different tack, piously praising Trump’s medical team and thanking the American people for their prayers. In an administration full of crooks and con men, Pence has always dutifully played the part of innocent choir boy.That’s been his role from the start. Back in 2016, Trump picked Pence, a failing governor of a small state, as his running mate for the sole purpose of bolstering his standing with white evangelicals. If religious conservatives felt unsure about voting for the thrice-married casino magnate and serial adulterer, Pence’s presence on the ticket convinced many — or at least provided them with a handy excuse — to vote for Trump. We may never know if Trump really needed Pence to capture the 81 percent of white evangelicals who voted for him in 2016. But their continued fervent enthusiasm for the president — they remain Trump’s strongest base of support — suggests Pence has never been the difference maker.Still, the overly-ambitious Pence knows what works with the base. “I’m a Christian, a conservative, and a Republican, in that order,” Pence often likes to dramatically say, a line that is as unctuous as it is untrue. But even if he doesn’t use those gimmicky words tonight, Harris, the former prosecutor, should hold them up as a damning indictment against Pence. Nearly four years into the administration, Pence has shown that more than anything, he’s a Trumper through and through, a willing accomplice to the president’s worst habits and actions rather than a consistent voice for any real principles, Christian or otherwise.With more than 200,000 Americans dead from coronavirus, Pence’s exaggerated religiosity may strike many Americans as particularly galling. The cruel indifference the Trump administration has shown to the suffering of ordinary Americans, not only in this pandemic but especially so,

Pairing service dogs with disabled veterans is goal of fitness challenge event this month | Local News

Hi! My name is Zero Suit Samus (or Samus for short), and I’m an energetic pitbull mix who needs some love. And I really mean that. I need a family who will cuddle with me because your penalty for not giving me cuddles is to hear the cry of my people. My foster dad says that based on my crying, I must have descended from pterodactyls, but that’s silly because pterodactyls don’t even like peanut butter. And I looove peanut butter. And treats. And strawberries. And watermelon. And anything, really. Honestly kid, if you give me your salad, I’ll eat it. Don’t want your broccoli? I’ll take care of your problem. See that toy? It’s in my stomach now. See that puke? Well, you can have your toy back.

Like all superdogs, I have an origin story: I ran across the highway and caused a 4-car pileup that I ended up underneath. It wasn’t my best choice, but it’s still a better love story than “Twilight.” I have to take daily medication now, or else I have pretty severe seizures. But I like to think of my epilepsy as my unbridled superpower that the world just isn’t ready for yet.

I’m a Tulsa native, but I’m still not a fan of the Bermuda grass around here – I get allergies in the summer, so that’s something you should know. Despite this, I still love running and rolling in the grass, and if you toss me a ball, I can jump and catch it in mid-air even when it’s 6-feet high. I’m not exaggerating. (Pterodactyl dogs never exaggerate.) And would you mind spraying me with a hose once in a while? I love playing in water, especially when it’s coming out of a tiny hose at jet-like speeds.

But if you have another dog in the home, then forget about it because I’m a single-dog dog. A lone wolf. A rebel. I will not share my toys, I will not share my food, and I will not share my family. I do just fine around other dogs in general, but once you introduce toys or food, then I get very territorial. Can we agree that I’ll be your only one?

By the way, I love kids. I don’t have these problems with other humans, so don’t worry about bringing me home to your young ones. I am loyal to the bone. Don’t believe me? Try going for a jog with me. I will keep pace with you the entire time, just running by your hip. Need me to lick the sweat off your face after an especially hot run? Baby, that’s what I’m about. I’m a good dog. My foster family says so, too. I will take care of you if you let me. I’m eager to learn, I don’t catch coronaviruses, and I’m housebroken. I won’t poop in your Cheerios. Unless that’s one of your commands, but why would it be? Don’t want your Cheerios? Just let me have them

SPORTS MEDICINE: National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Month a time to look back | John Doherty

When the season did resume for the Blues, though, in a bubble in Edmonton in July, the team announced that Bouwmeester was not going to be with them.

It is unlikely he will ever be with the Blues — or any other NHL team — again. Yet, the former Olympic gold medalist (Sochi 2014) should still be thankful. The presence of medical professionals and their swift use of the AED made his chance of survival much greater.

A study published in 2018 in Sports Health identified 132 cases of SCA suffered among athletes age 11 to 27 between 2014 and 2016. Survival to discharge from a hospital was the result for 64, or 48% of the victims. However, if an AED was present and used promptly, the survival rate increased to 89%. Furthermore, whether an AED was available or not, if an athletic trainer was in attendance, the survival rate was 83%.

Had Bouwmeester been stricken at home or on a city street, his chance of survival would have been only 10%. Multiple studies have consistently demonstrated that rate nationwide.

A more recent study, since the onset of COVID-19, reported worse numbers. The decreased survivability was blamed on bystanders declining to do CPR, because of being fearful of catching the virus, and paramedics taking longer to arrive, due to having to don extra equipment to protect themselves from the virus.

If more members of the general public were trained and willing to do CPR, the success rate found in athletic arenas would be duplicated elsewhere.

Source Article

Vera Bradley Honors Breast Cancer Awareness Month With “Be The Hope” Campaign

Vera Bradley Cotton Face Masks in Felicity Paisley and Felicity Paisley Pink

Now through the end of the year, 100% of the proceeds from Vera Bradley's two-pack of Cotton Face Masks in Felicity Paisley and Felicity Paisley Pink will be donated to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer.
Now through the end of the year, 100% of the proceeds from Vera Bradley’s two-pack of Cotton Face Masks in Felicity Paisley and Felicity Paisley Pink will be donated to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer.
Now through the end of the year, 100% of the proceeds from Vera Bradley’s two-pack of Cotton Face Masks in Felicity Paisley and Felicity Paisley Pink will be donated to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer.

Vera Bradley Honors Breast Cancer Awareness Month

For National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Vera Bradley has launched a campaign aimed at raising awareness about breast cancer, honoring the many women who have bravely battled this disease, and raising funds for the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer. Since 1993, Vera Bradley employees, business partners, customers and friends have joined together to raise more than $34.6 million for critical breast cancer research.
For National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Vera Bradley has launched a campaign aimed at raising awareness about breast cancer, honoring the many women who have bravely battled this disease, and raising funds for the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer. Since 1993, Vera Bradley employees, business partners, customers and friends have joined together to raise more than $34.6 million for critical breast cancer research.
For National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Vera Bradley has launched a campaign aimed at raising awareness about breast cancer, honoring the many women who have bravely battled this disease, and raising funds for the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer. Since 1993, Vera Bradley employees, business partners, customers and friends have joined together to raise more than $34.6 million for critical breast cancer research.

Throughout October, Company will Spotlight the Powerful and Passionate Work of the Faculty, Researchers and Doctors at the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer

FORT WAYNE, Ind., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Vera Bradley, Inc. (NASDAQ: VRA), the iconic women’s fashion and lifestyle brand, and the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer (the “Foundation”) are proud to launch the second iteration of their “Be The Hope” campaign in support of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The campaign aims to raise awareness about breast cancer, honor the many women who have bravely battled this disease, and raise funds for the Foundation. Since 1993, Vera Bradley employees, business partners, customers and friends have joined together to raise more than $34.6 million for critical breast cancer research.

The Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer raises funds for research to find a cure and to improve the lives of the many affected by this disease. The team at the Indiana University School of Medicine collaborates with researchers and leads clinical trials nationwide, focusing on developing and dramatically improving therapies for some of the most difficult-to-treat types of breast cancer, including triple negative breast cancer. Their progress on Monogrammed Medicine is leading to promising discoveries in the areas of diagnosis and personalized treatment, and in just the last six months, their research has led to four treatment drugs being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“The incredible staff at the Vera Bradley Foundation Center for Breast Cancer Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine work tirelessly every day to uncover medical breakthroughs and bring us closer to achieving our ultimate goal of a world without