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The Greatest Laptops For Medical College students

Animals aren’t individuals, so what’s protected on animals isn’t necessarily protected on people. Individuals converse over totally different options for animal testing and the inhumane way scientists treat these animals in experiments. It’s fair to say, if animals had been by no means used for any type of research, science and particularly medicine would not have advanced to where it is.

I feel this is cruel and unfair to animals this king of thing should be unlawful these poor creatures are suffering feeling pain and might’t do anything to stop it.individuals are stupid their enjoying wearing their making and fragrance and they do not understand that animals are being tested and dying just to allow them to look and smell good.

Hundreds of thousands of lives are saved every year due to one animal’s, outcomes to either a drug or new type of surgery, and I imagine as a substitute of believing that an animal’s life was a waste; I view it as an alternative as the next step in bettering people’s lives for hundreds of years to come.

It’s necessary to drink plenty of water whereas taking biotin. People who suppose that animals should be used for analysis are heartless. These medicines must be by no means taken with liquors as the presence of liquors in our body will ship 10 to 15 times larger than the conventional sleeping pulses despatched to brain by these medicines.

If exposed to infrared radiation for a very long time, the body can lose fluid or water and this may end up in dehydration. The remedy consisted of a surgeon making multiple cuts on the body while the blood drained into a bowl. Understanding the Prednisone unwanted effects or certainly of taking any drug stays a alternative for the consumer, yet typically such decisions fade into insignificance in opposition to the ravaging effects of the illness the drug’s taken to regulate.…

Launch a Global Medical Career with Manipal’s American University of Antigua, College of Medicine

Medical students can be an efficient contingency workforce, provided their lack of training is suitably addressed. Being capable and ready to respond to COVID-19 like pandemic situation needs crucial emphasis on disaster management and emergency medicine. The world is faced with the reality of the shortage of physicians and healthcare providers due to the challenges posed by the current epidemiological peak. From the larger perspective, it is about how the shortage of physicians worldwide is going to impact the global health scenario. A lack of training renders medical students non-essential to patient care; on the other hand, clinical training is essential to generate future responders against COVID-19. What should be the focus of medical institutions and aspiring medical students?

Manipal’s American University of Antigua College of Medicine (AUA) is one such renowned institute in the Caribbean that helps students from different corners of the world to fulfill their dreams of becoming doctors. For nearly two decades, the university is training future physicians and offering a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree. Gaining Experience in global healthcare is the way forward. AUA provides knowledge on global healthcare through its Global Health Track, which is conducted in collaboration with Florida International University (FIU). The purpose of the Global Health Track is to support and guide students in developing expertise in global health issues with the goal of subsequent career involvement involving patient care, service, policy making, research and education at a global level. 

Not all international medical universities and schools provide the opportunity to practice medicine in the US, Canada, the UK as well as in India. AUA’s curriculum is evaluated regularly to ensure that it is as per the standards of its USA and Canadian counterparts. AUA has collaborations/affiliations with many foreign universities like Florida International University (in the US), The University of Warwick (in the UK), and many others. Surrounded by beautiful nature with warm hospitality received from the people of the Caribbean region, AUA surely stands out to be a place to build a career in medicine and more than 3,000 students of AUA have graduated and are practicing in the US, Canada and the UK.

Manipal’s AUA emphasizes the need for well-rounded doctors. Hence, equal importance is given to the academic performance as well as emotional intelligence. The admission process is holistic that considers more than just the test scores

Alumnus Dr. Nandita Mahajan shares, “If anyone is planning to go for higher education in medicine, they should choose to go to AUA.”

The alumni of Manipal’s AUA stand testimonial to the difference being made by this institution in India as well as India’s contribution to global healthcare. The choice is usually driven by: greener pastures, studying abroad, acquiring a mere medical degree or contributing towards the larger purpose of improving the global healthcare scenario. 

Another alumnus Dr. Nandini Chattopadhyay reminisces, “The teaching that one receives in pre-clinical sciences in AUA, lay the foundation for clinical sciences. Everybody in AUA is always eager to help in

Medical Alley Shatters Records, Breaks $1 Billion Barrier in Three Quarters

The Medical Alley Association released their Q3 Investment Report Tuesday, revealing a record-breaking $1 billion raised in the first three quarters of 2020.

A year after raising over $1 billion in capital for the first time ever, Medical Alley companies accomplished the feat again, this time needing just three quarters to pass the $1 billion mark. In total, 58 Medical Alley companies have raised $1,015,712,605 so far this year, showing the strength of the early- and growth-stage ecosystem here and proving that 2019’s billion-dollar year was a show of ongoing growth. Digital health currently leads all sectors, having raised more than $658.6 million this year, but medical device companies are drawing substantial interest as well, with $315 million brought in so far this year.

Of the more than $1 billion raised this year, $759.3 million was raised in the third quarter alone, led by Bright Health’s $500 million Series E raise announced just eight days before the quarter’s end. Even before their exciting announcement, however, Medical Alley companies had already established a new record for funds raised in a third quarter — thanks to raises from Preventice Solutions, CVRx, and CardioMech — and had locked down the second strongest year-to-date in the last 10 years.

“During this pandemic, Medical Alley has been answering the call, delivering on our leadership position as the global epicenter of health innovation and care,” said Shaye Mandle, President and CEO of the Medical Alley Association. “Clearly, shattering another record for investment in Medical Alley health innovators demonstrates that the world increasingly looks to Medical Alley for today’s needs and to bring the future of healthcare forward.”

To see the full release and the Medical Alley Association’s analysis, visit us here.

About the Medical Alley Association

Founded in 1984, the Medical Alley Association supports and advances the global leadership of Medical Alley’s healthcare industry, and its connectivity around the world. MAA delivers the collective influence, intelligence and interactions that support Medical Alley.

www.medicalalley.org

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005867/en/

Contacts

Julia Coleman
[email protected]
952.746.3813

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How to Gain Research Experience as a Premed Student as Coronavirus Restrictions Continue | Medical School Admissions Doctor

For premed students hoping to gain some research experience before applying to medical school, the ongoing novel coronavirus pandemic poses a challenge to that goal. At a time when so much medical research has taken off, it is hard for students to find places on research teams. Hospitals and other clinical facilities are limiting entry into buildings, as are research labs at universities.

Since research experience can be an important part of a medical school application, figuring out where your application stands in terms of research and whether it makes sense to pursue opportunities at this time is imperative.

As a 2020-2021 applicant to med school, you will likely find yourself in one of three applicant categories.

First are students who already have robust research experience. These students may wish to strengthen their skills further or may have had research projects interrupted by COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

Second are students who have some research experience, but this research may not be related to science or health care and it may have involved few participation hours.

Finally, some students may have no research experience at all, and they face the prospect of applying to medical school without having had these opportunities.

Students With Robust Research Experience

If you are part of the first category of students, take a deep breath. You have had quality research experiences and have had the chance to hone the research skills that med schools value.

While you can still ask around about furthering your experience, do not worry if you cannot find another research opportunity. Instead, think about other activities that will meaningfully add to your application – like an online class or volunteering to deliver groceries to those at risk for complications from the coronavirus – and pursue those.

Students With Less or No Research Experience

If you are in the second or third groups of students, do not panic. While research is a good thing to have on your med school application, it is not the sole determinant of your admissions worthiness.

For example, I had no research on my med school application and I was admitted to med school. If you find yourself barred from in-person research environments due to the pandemic, reach out to a mentor or faculty member involved in an interesting project and offer to help with literature reviews or data analysis. Both of these types of work are critical to the research process, and they can be done remotely.

If you are unable to secure a research position, think about other means of strengthening your application. And if you are absolutely sure you want to do research prior to enrolling in med school, you always have the option to delay your application to a later cycle. The option to apply to med school will exist whenever you are ready to take it.

Remember that medical schools are sensitive to the disruptions resulting from the coronavirus. While it is important to present the most complete application

Medical College of Wisconsin CEO on science, academic medicine during COVID

Dr. John Raymond Sr. has served as president and CEO of the Milwaukee-based Medical College of Wisconsin since July 2010. It’s the nation’s third-largest private medical school, and its more than 1,600 faculty physicians constitute one of the largest medical groups in a state where COVID-19 cases have surged in recent weeks. Raymond talked with Assistant Managing Editor David May about lessons learned during the pandemic and priorities for the months ahead. The following is an edited transcript.

MH: Can you talk about Wisconsin’s COVID-19 caseload? It’s recently been one of the nation’s hot spots for surges in new cases.

Raymond: Like many parts of the Midwest, Wisconsin is experiencing rapid community spread of COVID-19, especially in the north central and northeastern regions of the state. In addition to a surge of new cases, the positivity rates and the reproductive numbers and measures of contagiousness are very unfavorable. So this indicates a large and growing burden of disease. Data posted (on Sept. 30) by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services showed that every county of the state had either a high or very high burden of disease. And more than half of the counties had a trajectory that was unfavorable.

And this has also been exacerbated by the need to quarantine healthcare staff, who either have active infections or who have confirmed exposure. In many cases, especially in rural parts of states, the staff is the bottleneck. You can create surge capacity for ventilators, ICU beds and hospital beds, but if you don’t have enough staff to take care of the patients, that’s a real problem.

MH: Initial reporting was that the universities were a part the problem, but what about the rural areas? Is there a general theory about what’s happening?

Raymond: We had well over 100,000 students, returning to school; most of the universities in Wisconsin had some form of in-person classroom activity that began in early September and late August. So for the first week in September, when the surge really was beginning to be apparent in Wisconsin, most of the cases were associated with young people in the 18-24 range. There was a very, very significant spike in cases. What was interesting though, is the spike wasn’t limited just to counties that had a large university; we were seeing community spread in addition to the return of thousands of students. And we believe that was in part due to long-term (pandemic) fatigue, some skepticism about the utility of wearing a masks and a lot of gatherings and relaxation of social distancing around the Labor Day holidays.

MH: Given all that’s transpired, what have your doctors and affiliated hospitals learned during this pandemic?

Raymond: Like other parts of the country, we now know much better how to triage and provide supportive care for patients with COVID-19. And there are some moderately effective therapeutics that we can strategically deploy to help us. Just the level of comfort in taking care of novel coronavirus has increased significantly.

We’ve been

Trump hails his COVID ‘cure’ as leading medical journal calls him ‘dangerously incompetent’ on pandemic






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President Trump continued to hail an experimental monoclonal antibody treatment as a “cure” for COVID-19, telling conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh in a Friday interview that it sped his recovery from the disease and was “better than a vaccine.”

“I was not in great shape, but we have a medicine that healed me, that fixed me,” Trump said of the antibody “cocktail” manufactured by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. ”It’s a great medicine. I recovered immediately.”

Since being released from Walter Reed Medical Center on Monday, where he was treated for three days after being admitted with a high fever, chills and breathing problems, Trump has often pointed to the antibody therapy he undertook at the hospital as a “cure” for COVID-19. There is no known cure for the disease caused by exposure the coronavirus, and the FDA has not, so far, approved the drug’s use for treating COVID-19.

Just as he had done with the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine, which Trump took in May as a prophylactic against COVID-19, the president didn’t hesitate describing Regeneron’s “cocktail” in the most glowing possible terms.

“We have a cure. More than just a therapeutic, have a cure,” Trump said of the antibody treatment, adding, “This is better than the vaccine.”

Both Regeneron and the drug manufacturer Eli Lilly have released limited studies showing that monoclonal antibody treatments can decrease the viral load of COVID-19 in patients who have not been hospitalized for the disease. Trump’s assertions about the drug have not been proven in any study, and he received other drugs, including Remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone, since testing positive for COVID-19 on Thursday, Oct. 1.

On Tuesday, Trump voiced his frustration with the Food and Drug Administration for requiring drug manufacturers to follow safety protocols that will slow the availability of a vaccine until after the Nov. 3 election.

Perhaps the central issue in the presidential election is Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, and during his rambling two-hour phone call with Limbaugh, the president again complained about not receiving enough praise for his administration’s efforts to slow the spread of the virus.

“We’ve done such a good job on the pandemic. We get zero credit,” Trump said.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Trump arrives at the White House wearing a facemask upon his return from Walter Reed Medical Center on October 5, 2020. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)


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President Trump arrives at the White House wearing a facemask upon his return from Walter Reed Medical Center on October 5, 2020. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)

As of Friday afternoon, at least 7.6 million Americans had tested positive and at least 213,158 had died from COVID-19, far more than in any other country.

On Thursday, the New England Journal of Medicine broke precedent and for the first time in its history published an editorial calling for a president to be voted out of office. The editors disagreed that Trump did “such a good

The medical facts about Mike Pence’s debate red eye

Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday night managed to make it to the debate stage despite the fact the White House is in the middle of a coronavirus outbreak that seems to continue to grow. 

During the debate against Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, Pence’s left eye quickly became the talk of the internet after people noticed it appeared to be red and blurry throughout his performance.

While it’s not clear why the vice president’s eye looked a bit off and he recently tested negative for COVID-19, it prompted many users to speculate on whether it could be an indication Pence may be infected with the coronavirus, as pink eye is known to be a symptom. 

 

Typical symptoms of the coronavirus include fever, cough, nasal congestion, sore throat, fatigue and shortness of breath, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Although it’s true conjunctivitis has been seen in coronavirus patients, it appears to be a rare occurrence. 

A meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medical Virology in May found conjunctivitis occurs in about 1.1 percent of all COVID-19 cases. 

The study found pink eye was more common in severe coronavirus cases. The symptom was seen in 3 percent of severe cases compared to just 0.7 percent of mild cases. 

Conjunctivitis can be highly contagious and is typically caused by bacteria and adenoviruses that can spread easily from person to person, so COVID-19 is certainly not the only possible infectious cause of eye redness. 

It’s also a giant leap to make the claim Pence was experiencing pink eye to begin with, let alone that it was brought on by the coronavirus. Redness in the eyes can be caused by a long list of possibilities such as dry eyes, allergies and broken blood vessels in the eye. 

As President Trump and several other White House officials, aides and advisers have tested positive for COVID-19 over the past week, Pence tested negative for the virus on Tuesday and “has remained healthy, without any COVID-19 symptoms,” according to his physician Jess Schonau. 

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Reflow Medical Receives Approval in Japan for the Wingman Catheter to Cross Chronic Total Occlusions (CTOs) in Peripheral Artery Disease

Reflow Medical, Inc., a California-based medical device company, announced that Japan’s Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) has approved the Wingman™ CTO Catheter. Reflow Medical has partnered with Century Medical, Inc. (CMI), a leading medical device distributor based in Tokyo, to introduce the Wingman CTO Catheter in Japan.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005741/en/

Wingman CTO Catheter (Photo: Business Wire)

The Wingman Catheter crosses peripheral CTOs using an extendable beveled tip. The physician controls the advancement and activation of the tip to create a channel to help penetrate, or cross, the occlusion with a guidewire, enabling further treatment of the lesion with therapeutic devices. The catheter is compatible with the physician’s preferred guidewire and procedural technique.

Approval by Japan’s PMDA follows the completion of the Wing-IT CTO clinical trial, a prospective, international, multicenter study that treated 85 patients and followed them for 30 days. The Wingman Catheter was able to demonstrate a 90% crossing rate when up to two previous guidewires could not cross the CTOs, meeting its primary safety and efficacy endpoints.

“We are very excited to launch the Wingman CTO catheter in the Japanese market,” said CMI President and CEO Takahiko Motani. “This product should have a significant impact on the Japanese peripheral market by helping physicians address specific treatment challenges within a growing patient population. We look forward to providing this new and unique device in partnership with Reflow Medical, Inc.”

“Reflow Medical focuses their efforts on developing technologies based on physicians’ needs,” said John R. Laird, MD, of Adventist Heart and Vascular Institute in St. Helena, California. Dr. Laird was the principal investigator for the study. “We rely on Reflow for real clinical evidence when utilizing the technology.”

“It is an honor for our device to have gained approval by Japan’s PMDA,” noted Reflow Medical Co-founder and CEO Isa Rizk. “We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with a fantastic organization like Century Medical.”

Reflow’s Wingman Crossing Catheter received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the expanded CTO indication for the Wingman Crossing Catheter in March 2020 after completing the Wing-IT clinical trial.

About Reflow Medical, Inc.

Reflow Medical, Inc. is a private company focused on empowering physicians through the design and development of innovative and effective technologies for cardiovascular disease. Reflow is developing a family of products to treat cardiovascular disease.

About Century Medical, Inc.

Century Medical, Inc. (CMI) is one of the largest independent medical device distributors in Japan, with more than 40 years of experience marketing medical devices. CMI has been a pioneering force, successfully introducing many new technologies to the Japanese healthcare community. Century Medical, Inc, is a wholly owned subsidiary of ITOCHU Corporation.

About Chronic Total Occlusions (CTO) in Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

Chronic total occlusions (CTO) of the lower extremities are found in 40% of symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients. Endovascular options for the treatment of a CTO can be complex; conventional wire and catheter technique have a

Minneapolis Medical Clinic Embraces Native American Cultural Healing During Coronavirus | Healthiest Communities

MINNEAPOLIS — Every morning, around 30 staff members with the Native American Community Clinic get together in an online virtual huddle.

Before the day’s duties are assigned, Elder in Residence Renee Beaulieu-Banks, a member of the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, starts out with a quick blessing – first in Ojibwemowin, and then again in English.

“We have conversations with spirits. We invite them to listen. We thank them, offer them tobacco for our requests and for our gratitude,” Beaulieu-Banks says. “That’s what I do in the morning. I do a request for healing. Not only for ourselves, but for the community and each other.”

Beaulieu-Banks also addresses the spirit of COVID-19, requesting that it have mercy on not only the native people, but everyone. She thanks the spirits for bringing the medical team together for this work, calling them “our warriors.” Staff members at the clinic, which provides health services to members of Minneapolis’ sizable Native American population, overwhelmingly say the introduction helps orient them and starts the day out in a “good way.”

Much of the coverage of Native Americans during the pandemic has focused on hard-hit rural reservations. But 78% of American Indians and Alaska Natives – who were either AI/AN alone or in combination with at least one other race – lived outside reservations or similar areas as of the 2010 Census, many of them in urban areas. Native residents of Minneapolis haven’t been immune to the challenges posed by COVID-19, including the mental health impacts of quarantine, isolation and financial instability.

The Native American Community Clinic in Minneapolis has been able to meet their needs not only by shifting online, but through its integration of traditional and spiritual healing into its programming.

“We’ve wanted to amplify the capacity to do integrated cultural healing into the clinic. It seems like it took forever to get here. But we’re finally here,” says NACC CEO Antony Stately, who is a member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and has familial ties to the Red Lake and White Earth Ojibwe nations. “Elders are helping guide the way.”

According to census data reported by the Urban Indian Health Institute, more than 29,000 people in Minnesota’s MinneapolisSt. Paul area identified as American Indian or Alaska Native alone or in combination with any other race in recent years. That includes NACC’s neighboring Little Earth community, an affordable housing complex that claims it has about 1,500 mostly native residents. NACC serves roughly 4,500 patients a year.

Luckily, the clinic had the infrastructure for telehealth already in place before the pandemic. On April 20, two employees tested positive for COVID-19. The clinic had to basically shut down for two weeks, and the staff had to learn how to operate via telehealth – and quickly.

“We were up and running on Day One, and adjusted very fast,” NACC Chief Medical Officer Kari Rabie says. “Given our position and what we do, that’s what we do anyways. We always joke that it’s

Plexiglass barriers at Pence-Harris debate ‘are a joke,’ won’t stop coronavirus, medical experts say

The Commission on Presidential Debates is taking extra precautions at Wednesday night’s Vice Presidential debate given the coronavirus outbreak in the White House, but pictures of two curved plexiglass barriers they plan to use has some epidemiologists and airborne pathogen specialists scratching their heads.

Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris will be seated more than 12 feet apart and separated by two plexiglass barriers. But those barriers are “entirely symbolic,” according to Dr. Bill Schaffner, an epidemiologist at Vanderbilt University.

The commission became worried after President Donald Trump and several White House staff contracted Covid-19 shortly after last Tuesday’s presidential debate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Pence was not in “close contact” with Trump, who announced that he was infected with the virus early Friday morning.

Nonetheless, a person familiar with the debate planning told NBC News that Harris’ campaign asked for the plexiglass to be used at the event at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

The plexiglass is “minimal protection,” Schaffner said in a phone interview, adding that the barriers are mostly “cosmetic.” 

However, he added that barriers are one part of a “layered approach” that includes testing and distancing of everyone on stage. Everyone in the debate hall is required to wear a mask and there will be no handshake or physical greeting between Pence and Harris, according to the commission. Altogether, he said, the steps have likely reduced the risk of spread occurring.

The plexiglass barriers are just one “part of the CPD’s overall approach to health and safety,” according to a fact sheet distributed by the commission.

The debate is due to take place indoors and, of course, plenty of talking is expected. That’s important because the CDC released new guidance on Monday that said the virus can spread through particles in the air between people who are further than six feet apart in certain environments. The CDC said the risk of that occurring increases indoors and when people are doing certain activities, including speaking.

Jeff Siegel, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Toronto and a specialist in indoor air quality, ventilation and filtration, said the risk of virus-carrying particles going airborne in an environment like a debate when people are talking loudly is “huge.”

“On the plus side, it’s a pretty big space, so there’s a big dilution effect,” he said over the phone, adding that Harris, Pence and the moderator, Susan Page, will be spaced out appropriately. The high ceiling and large room will also help to reduce risk, he said.

“But they’re not addressing things like ventilation,” Siegel said, adding that he hopes the debate hall has appropriately up-to-date air filtration and ventilation systems. “If I was Vice President Pence’s staff or Harris’ staff, I would certainly want to get a portable HEPA filter in there.”

HEPA filters are high-performing air filters that capture very small particles in the air. The commission did not return CNBC’s request for comment on the building’s