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Medicine’s Changing View Of Racism Towards Healthcare Professionals

Almost a decade ago, I was subject to a racist tirade by a patient.

The patient told me, “Why don’t you go back to India?”  

I responded angrily to the patient: “Why don’t you leave this [expletive] hospital?” 

I sought guidance on how to cope with and respond to the patient’s racism and found little.  The institution at which I worked had no policies in place that guided my response.

I had the patient’s care reassigned to other physicians and subsequently wrote about my experience and reflections in an essay called, “The Racist Patient,” that was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and featured in the New York Times.

My conclusion: there were limits to service and the abuse to which we might accept as healthcare professionals.

The essay generated controversy and drew two different kinds of responses.

The first set of responses was from sympathetic physicians with like experiences who felt unprotected by the institutional cultures in which they worked.  

I heard from an African American physician whose hospital routinely reassigned patients from his care so as to not compromise their patient satisfaction results.

I heard also from a pharmacist whose management accommodated a patient request to not have “that Paki touching [their] meds or speaking to [her] about them so make sure the other pharmacist is available.”  

One Vietnamese-American academic physician wrote:

“I am of Vietnamese-descent and your article had a resounding impact on me.  I have experienced such overt racist and sexist comments in my career made so much more difficult when it is directed at me as an attending physician and in front of my residents.”

The second, more dominant set of responses was from physicians who held the view that healthcare professionals are somehow held to a higher ethical standard, that the unwritten code of professionalism requires us to ignore our own feelings and continue to care for patients regardless of their views.

One physician wrote an extensive letter to me in response:

“The tone and words in your article demonstrate to me that you have a long way to travel, not to India or anywhere else, but to a place in your heart that tells you that being a good doctor means that patients, even difficult patients, deserve better treatment than that which you gave to [the patient]….But upon further reflection you arrogantly felt justified in not apologizing to him because ‘there are clear limits’ to your service. Yes, doctors are not slaves, submitting to any kind of abuse but your….response was not professional.”

Another physician wrote a published letter to the Annals of Internal:

“His complaint was legitimate…You missed an opportunity to heal and win over a fellow man.”

I certainly regretted my angry instinctual initial response—but also felt that the traditional institutional perspective on abusive, racist patients is medicine’s own version of “the customer is always right.” Being a medical

Insider Q&A: Healthcare Ready director on disaster response

When natural disasters strike, quickly getting the right aid to people is difficult at best. Doing so amid the worst pandemic in a century increases that challenge dramatically.

For thousands of Americans displaced this year by hurricanes, floods and wildfires — plus those trying to avoid COVID-19 — getting their drugs and medical supplies has been critical.

Healthcare Ready, a tiny disaster preparedness and response group, serves as a crucial hub for coordinating donations and shipments of medicines, protective gear and other supplies to those in need.

The Associated Press recently talked with its executive director, Nicolette Louissaint.

Q: What led to your group’s formation in 2005?

A: After Hurricane Katrina, there was a lot of frustration. Pharmaceutical companies knew they could do more to help but didn’t know how to get their medicines into shelters, because they didn’t have relationships with law enforcement, public health agencies or the Red Cross. They decided, let’s do this as a coalition.

Q: How do you prepare for disasters?

A: We make sure we’re refreshing our contacts every year, touching every state’s emergency management and health organizations. We work with national groups with a local presence in many communities, like churches and the NAACP. We do preparedness projects to identify populations that would have the greatest medical needs after a disaster.

Q: How has your work evolved since Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria hit in 2017?

A: The landscape has only gotten more and more difficult. It’s the intensity of the events and the frequency. Being poised to jump in and provide support for multiple intensive events is the hardest challenge, and that’s what COVID has been testing for us.

Q: During the pandemic, medicines largely remained available. What’s been your focus?

A: We continue to work closely with the manufacturers and distributors of personal protective equipment, to have a single clearinghouse for our emergency management agency partners. We worked with the National Governors Association to vet and create a list of credible suppliers of those products. We worked with Project Hope and the Business Roundtable to identify products needed and then distribute their donations to community groups, nursing homes and clinics.

We do a lot of info sharing. We set up our “RX Open” map so people could see where pharmacies were open before leaving home amid stay-at-home orders.

Q: Are you helping with the wildfires?

A: We’re working with pharma and the Red Cross, making sure everyone isn’t sending the same thing. We’re working with pharmacies to be sure they have the medicines they need. We have some partners prepared to provide donations for individuals who’ve lost their homes.

Q: How is Healthcare Ready funded?

A: We receive contributions from the associations for drug manufacturers, distributors, chain pharmacies and other companies, plus other grants and donations.

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What’s Challenging Growth in the Healthcare M&A Space During the COVID-19 Crisis? Infiniti’s M&A Support Experts Discuss the Future

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused economic disruption in many major segments of North America, Europe, and APAC regions. For healthcare M&A this has translated into the collapse of deals that were underway and limited options for companies in the healthcare M&A space. How can healthcare M&A recover from the business implications of the COVID-19 pandemic? Infiniti’s experts observed that the high dependency on healthcare is expected to cause a surge in valuations once the situation normalizes. With Infiniti’s M&A support solutions, healthcare companies can focus on finding the ideal deal shortly and gain data-driven guidance from our experts. To stay a step ahead of changing market dynamics, and tackle the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on healthcare M&A, request a free proposal.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201001005753/en/

Three Major Challenges Impacting the Healthcare M&A Space During the COVID-19 Crisis (Graphic: Business Wire)

The global healthcare sector has witnessed challenging times due to the COVID-19 pandemic in recent times. Healthcare institutions, medical professionals, and healthcare company boards are attempting to cope with the pandemic’s startling changes. The healthcare M&A space was similarly impacted, and healthcare mergers have reduced substantially in the second quarter of 2020. As the world works towards recovery, healthcare companies need to understand the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on healthcare M&A and accordingly prepare for the future. Therefore, in their recent article, Infiniti’s M&A support experts discuss the biggest challenges of COVID-19 in the healthcare space, and two minor factors positively impacting the recovering healthcare M&A space.

“While investor support has increased due to the increasing need for healthcare globally, social and political unrest, struggling economies and volatility in financial markets are testing the healthcare industry. Healthcare M&A may be one of the most effective solutions to this crisis,” says an M&A support expert at Infiniti Research.

Speak to our industry experts to gain data-driven insights on the implications of COVID-19 in the healthcare industry, and strategize for the post-COVID era.

Infiniti’s experts identified the following three major challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic in healthcare M&A:

  • Nationwide lockdowns and limitations for governing bodies have led to delays in acquiring regulatory clearance.

  • The impact of COVID-19 on healthcare M&A participants will change the valuation of both the buyer and seller.

  • Due to renewed safety and hygiene protocols, and social distancing has made it challenging for companies to conduct thorough due diligence, and delayed third-party approvals.

Gain comprehensive insights into the impact and solutions of these major challenges by reading the complete article here.

About Infiniti Research

Established in 2003, Infiniti Research is a leading market intelligence company providing smart solutions to address your business challenges. Infiniti Research studies markets in more than 100 countries to analyze competitive activity, see beyond market disruptions and develop intelligent business strategies. To know more, visit: https://www.infinitiresearch.com/about-us

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201001005753/en/

Contacts

Infiniti Research
Anirban Choudhury
Marketing Manager
US: +1 844 778 0600
UK: +44 203 893 3400
https://www.infinitiresearch.com/contact-us

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Award-Winning Alignment Healthcare Expands Plans & Benefits, Available to 5.9 Million Seniors This Medicare Enrollment Season

Medicare Advantage company offers seniors new 24/7 virtual care plan, new social benefits such as pet-sitting, acupuncture and personal emergency response systems

Alignment Healthcare, a mission-based Medicare Advantage insurance company founded in 2013, announced today new plans and benefits to give seniors more care options during Medicare’s annual enrollment period for 2021, which runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2020. Through Alignment Health Plan, the company is offering 36 Medicare Advantage options in three states, including a virtual-first health plan that includes a $50 monthly premium rebate, as well as a host of new benefits such as pet-sitting, pest control and acupuncture to ensure their social and lifestyle needs are met.

Seniors are increasingly turning to Alignment each year due to its “senior first” model, which earned Alignment numerous accolades including the 2020 Senior Choice Gold Award and 2020 U.S. News & World Report “Best Insurance Companies for Medicare Advantage” recognition.

“As more Americans enter their senior years, it is critical for us to continue providing not only the best of clinical outcomes but also the best customer experience that seniors need and deserve,” said John Kao, founder and CEO, Alignment Healthcare. “Our new plans and benefits reflect the innovation and compassion that sets Alignment apart as we continue to grow and serve seniors nationwide.”

Among Alignment Health Plan’s 14 new plan offerings available starting Jan. 1, 2021, is the AVA™ HMO plan, a virtual-first plan that gives members a dedicated primary care provider and specialists – accessible by phone or video on the company’s proprietary AVA™ data and technology platform – as well as providers available in person to see the patient at home or in the doctor’s office as needed. The virtual plan also comes with a monthly $50 premium rebate and $100 per month over-the-counter credit, redeemable at Walmart, Walgreens, CVS and other retailers.

In addition to this virtual option, Alignment is offering new HMO dual-eligible special needs and HMO point-of-service plans. In select plans, Alignment is introducing new benefits as part of its ACCESS On-Demand Concierge program for eligible members to address social needs such as food instability, loneliness and lack of transportation, that directly impact clinical outcomes. In 2021, new social benefits include pet sitting, pest control, personal emergency response systems, and acupuncture services to further extend the program’s existing benefits such as grocery allowance, non-emergency clinical transportation and “grandkids on demand” companion care.

“Putting the seniors first is what we do each day at Alignment,” said Dawn Maroney, president of consumer and markets, Alignment Healthcare. “That’s why around COVID-19, we delivered thousands of masks and meals, hosted virtual town hall meetings to answer questions, and proactively checked in on our highest-risk members. We bring this same spirit to open enrollment. No matter which plan they choose, Alignment members have a dedicated 24/7 care and support team available to create the best outcomes and experience for each and every one of them.”

Alignment announced in August its expansion into new counties and new

Orange Business Services Gains Ground in e-health and Consolidates Healthcare Activities Within Enovacom Subsidiary

  • Enovacom will consolidate and develop the Orange Business Services Healthcare division from October 1, 2020

  • The ambition of Orange Business Services, through Enovacom, is to become one of the leaders in digital Health in France

The healthcare sector is a key focus of Orange’s 2025 strategic plan. As part of this, Orange Business Services is reorganizing its healthcare entities, Enovacom and Orange Healthcare, to fully meet the needs of the players in this sector, which is currently undergoing a digital transformation, both in France and abroad.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201001005451/en/

Enovacom and Orange Healthcare, to fully meet the needs of the players in the health sector, which is currently undergoing a digital transformation (Photo: Orange Business Services)

As of today, Orange Healthcare B2B activities have been transferred to Enovacom. With a team of 250 people, this unique hub will boost synergies and support the digital shift in healthcare. With headquarters in Marseille, the integrated team also supports the Group’s commitment to reinforce its strategic activities in local regions, as close as possible to local players and talent. This transformation is being complemented by an ambitious recruitment plan.

Orange Business Services understands the need to gain momentum in the healthcare sector. Thanks to this integration, Enovacom—which is already a leader in terms of interoperability in France—will see its expertise enhanced and expand its portfolio to offer tailored solutions for all healthcare players. Enovacom will be able to take advantage of the strengths of the Orange Group to face the many healthcare challenges ahead and take part in larger scale projects. Enovacom has all the attributes required to become a leader in e-health in France,” says Pierre-Louis Biaggi, Senior Vice President, Digital and Data, Orange Business Services and CEO of Enovacom.

A new page of Enovacom’s history is being written. By focusing on the healthcare ambitions of the Digital and Data unit of Orange Business Services from now on, we are taking on a new dimension. Now more than ever we need to work alongside those who care for us in order to improve medical devices. The support and expertise of Orange Business Services will help solidify the foundations of Enovacom solutions. Our commitment at present is to develop new products to meet the current and future needs of our 1,600 customers,” adds Laurent Frigara, Deputy CEO of Enovacom.

Within the Digital and Data business unit, Enovacom will be led by Laurent Frigara and Renaud Luparia — Co-founders and current Deputy CEOs. The organization, whose 250 employees are spread across Marseille, Paris, London and Montreal, hosts the Healthcare activities of Orange Business Services, structured around three main Departments:

The Operations and Transformation Department under the leadership of Eric Pieuchot. This department will ensure the deployment and operation of services to customers while ensuring the compliance of processes and the security of operations related to ISO-27001- and HDS-certified Data Hosting activities.
The Business Department, in particular

Why Trump Has No Real Health-Care Plan

While the House and Senate plans did include funds for states to create “high-risk pools,” which would subsidize coverage for those requiring more medical care, such pools have been tried in about 30 states and have uniformly failed. States found that they could not allocate anywhere near the amount of money necessary to make coverage affordable for patients with preexisting conditions, and experts say the plans’ funding was equally inadequate. “The cost would have to be tremendous, and that is precisely because of the skewed distribution of health-care spending,” Blumberg said. “In order to make that coverage affordable for the people who need it, you would have to throw huge amounts of money at those pools.”

More recently, many Senate Republicans have rallied behind 2019 legislation from Senator Thom Tillis, who is facing a tough reelection fight in North Carolina. His bill declares that insurers must continue selling coverage to patients with preexisting conditions at comparable prices to what they charge other consumers. But the bill contains huge loopholes that undermine that promise. It allows insurers to limit the benefits provided in such coverage, which could exclude the treatments a patient needs. It also doesn’t maintain the ACA’s limits on out-of-pocket costs, or its ban on annual and lifetime benefits caps, which means those with substantial health problems could easily generate bills that exceed their coverage. All of those provisions provide insurers “another way of excluding coverage of preexisting conditions,” Sarah Lueck, a senior policy analyst for health care at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, told me.

Meanwhile, with repeal of the ACA again wending its way through the courts, Trump has tried to advance the GOP goal of unraveling risk-sharing through regulatory action. His administration has authorized insurance companies to sell more short-term plans that are exempt from the ACA’s requirements to cover patients with preexisting conditions and offer comprehensive benefits. Those plans provide an escape route for healthier consumers to buy cheaper coverage, which could tilt the general individual market more toward the sick, raising their premiums.

The paradox in the contrasting GOP and Democratic approaches, as I’ve written, is that the Democratic plans ask more of the young—who mostly vote for Democrats—while the Republican plans impose greater costs on older Americans, most of whom are white and have leaned toward the GOP for the past few decades.

Biden’s proposals to significantly increase federal subsidies for consumers purchasing insurance in the ACA marketplaces represent a tacit admission that the law’s original design may have asked healthier consumers to shoulder too much of the cost of ensuring coverage for those who are older and sicker. Expanding subsidies could also entice more younger and healthier people into the insurance market, which would help restrain costs. By contrast, Trump and other Republicans are still resolutely denying the inescapable reality that their proposals will increase costs and reduce access for the sick, not as

This is What it’s Like to Navigate Healthcare While Black

We still have a long way to go before Black people receive the medical care they need.

This is Race and Medicine, a series dedicated to unearthing the uncomfortable and sometimes life-threatening truth about racism in healthcare. By highlighting the experiences of Black people and honoring their health journeys, we look to a future where medical racism is a thing of the past.


As a dark-skinned and sometimes sensitive little Black girl, I could never shake the feeling from my bones that my pain might be viewed as inconsequential to the very people who were supposed to provide medical care to me. It’s still something I have trouble reconciling.

With the legacy of medical racism dating back to antebellum America, it’s no surprise that Black patients seeking treatment today are still mistrustful, cautious, and protective.

As a child, I remember watching movies about how the U.S. Department of Public Health experimented on Black war veterans by withholding syphilis treatment without informed consent.

Later, I learned about white doctors testing the first gynecological instruments on enslaved Black women without anesthesia and using Black cells for groundbreaking HeLa cancer research without consent.

I sat down to talk to Black patients of all ages about their racist experiences in healthcare. Some of them wish to remain anonymous due to the stigma of openly discussing mental health, while others work in the healthcare industry and fear professional backlash.

Here are their stories.

“Maya,” 38, works as a doctor and has experienced racism among her colleagues and as a patient. Due to the professional risk of speaking out, she asked that her name be changed.

Maya’s experiences with racism in healthcare began as she looked for a job after her residency ended. Maya asked for a recommendation from the lead doctor she had worked with for 3 years and got a yes.

Once Maya got the job, which was a per diem temporary position, the woman who hired her let her know that her reference might not be ideal.

The lead doctor had said, “Well, Maya is not a go-getter.”

The woman hiring asked, “What do you mean? Is she smart? Does she know what she’s doing? Does she work hard?”

The lead doctor said yes, and Maya was hired.

The second doctor in the residency, a Black male, applied for a per diem job at the same clinic where the residency took place. The lead doctor wanted him to interview, even though she worked side by side with him for 3 years.

While she reluctantly recommended Maya and required the other Black doctor to interview, the same doctor went out of her way to create a job for the third resident, a white male medical student.

Per diem jobs are temporary, have no guaranteed hours, and benefits are rarely provided. It’s difficult to secure stable income, and many providers have to work multiple jobs just to make ends meet.

Like Maya, Black residents and doctors already exist at the margins of their field.

In

Worried You’ll Lose Obamacare? These States Have the Cheapest Healthcare Costs



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

CorroHealth Emerges as a Leader in Healthcare Reimbursement Solutions, Following Merger of Four Industry Players

Four healthcare services and technology organizations have launched under a combined brand—CorroHealth. TrustHCS, Visionary RCM, T-System and RevCycle+ joined forces to provide a greater breadth of reimbursement cycle, risk adjustment and quality solutions to health systems and payers. Global investment firm The Carlyle Group (NASDAQ: CG) owns a majority stake in CorroHealth, with Cannae Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: CNNE), Sanaka Group, and affiliates of TripleTree Holdings also serving as investors.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200930005234/en/

Patrick Leonard serves as CEO of CorroHealth. (Image: CorroHealth)

CorroHealth—driven by helping clients navigate regulatory and compliance complexities to ease physician burdens and improve financial outcomes—emerges at a time when financial health is particularly important for health systems and payers.

“We knew health systems and plans would have a growing need for our solutions, so we worked hard and found a way to bring all 4,000 employees together as one company—united by our core,” said CorroHealth CEO Patrick Leonard. “At CorroHealth, we will drive results for our clients with our scalable solutions, clinical expertise, and our ability to manage across the continuum of complexity and value.”

CorroHealth combines the industry-leading domestic middle revenue cycle group of TrustHCS, with the full-service global delivery model of Visionary RCM, the emergency documentation technology solutions of T-System, and the advanced coding solutions of RevCycle+.

“Our new and unified brand name speaks to our mission to advance health by connecting people to the right solutions at the right time,” added Leonard. “We are proud of our fully integrated team and excited for the growth journey ahead.”

“We see the highly complementary nature of CorroHealth’s solutions as uniquely able to add value for health system and health plan customers,” said Joe Bress, a Principal specializing in healthcare at The Carlyle Group. “We’re excited to partner with Pat and the company’s leading management team to help build the CorroHealth platform.”

“We believe CorroHealth is well positioned for organic and inorganic growth opportunities,” added fellow Carlyle Principal James Shillito. “Carlyle and the entire investor group look forward to supporting this growth going forward.”

The four legacy company names will remain through the end of 2020 with a final move to the CorroHealth name across all companies beginning Jan. 1, 2021.

Equity capital for the investment came from the Carlyle Equity Opportunity Fund II that makes majority and strategic minority investments primarily in the U.S. in targeted industries, including healthcare.

About CorroHealth

Our core purpose is to help you exceed your financial health goals. Across the reimbursement cycle, our scalable programs and clinical expertise help solve programmatic needs. Enabling our skilled domestic and global teams with leading technology allows analytics to guide our solutions and keeps us accountable to your goals. For both health systems and plans, we navigate regulatory and compliance complexities, ease physician burdens and improve financial outcomes. We consistently deliver the right solutions at the right time.

For additional information about CorroHealth, please visit www.CorroHealth.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200930005234/en/

Contacts

Sara Payne,

PJ SOLOMON Enters Healthcare Investment Banking with Hiring of Ryan Stewart

Mr. Stewart to lead Healthcare Technology & Tech-Enabled Services franchise with over 25 years of experience as an investment banker, equity research analyst and industry operator

Ryan Stewart Headshot

Ryan Stewart Headshot
Ryan Stewart Headshot
Ryan Stewart Headshot

NEW YORK, Sept. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — PJ SOLOMON, a leading financial advisory firm and independently operated affiliate of Natixis, has entered into healthcare investment banking with the hiring of Ryan Stewart as a Managing Director to build and lead its new Healthcare Technology & Tech-Enabled Services subsector.

Mr. Stewart specializes in advising healthcare technology & tech-enabled services companies, as well as financial sponsors that invest across the sector. At PJ SOLOMON he will continue to focus on core end-markets including: payer-tech & outsourcing, tech-enabled managed care, provider-tech, virtual care & remote patient monitoring and pharma-tech & real-world evidence. He brings more than 25 years of industry experience and expertise, having worked and advised in the healthcare technology and managed care sector as an investment banker, equity research analyst, management consultant and operating executive.

“Healthcare technology and tech-enabled services is a natural extension of PJ SOLOMON’s push into high-growth verticals and one which Ryan, with his deep industry expertise and success in building and scaling investment banking practices, is uniquely suited to lead,” said Marc Cooper, CEO of PJ SOLOMON. “Ryan’s hiring comes shortly after we brought on Syed Husain to lead our Pharmacy subsector and together, they mark our first concerted effort into healthcare investment banking. We are excited to welcome Ryan during this period of sustained growth and look forward to building out our overall healthcare offering to better serve our clients.”

“With an unrivaled depth of experience, some of the strongest client relationships in the industry and a continuous growth mindset, PJ SOLOMON is a natural next step in my career,” said Mr. Stewart. “The number of new verticals the firm has added over such a short period of time is truly a testament to PJ SOLOMON’s commitment to expand and diversify its platform to better serve the firm’s clients. I am excited to contribute by building out the healthcare technology & tech-enabled services subsector into a competitive offering that augments the best-in-class platform PJ SOLOMON has developed, especially at a time of unprecedented innovation, growth and digital transformation across the healthcare-tech space.”

Mr. Stewart most recently served as a Managing Director at SVB Leerink where he spent the past five years building and leading the firm’s Healthcare Technology Investment Banking franchise. Prior to SVB Leerink, Mr. Stewart spent six years as a Managing Director and Partner at TripleTree.

Over the past decade, Mr. Stewart advised on several key sector transactions worth a total of $8B. These include, among others, iHealth Technologies’ sale to Advent International-backed Connolly LLC, Altegra Health’s $910M sale to Change Healthcare, KEPRO’s sale to Apax Partners, New Century Health’s sale to Evolent Health, Orion Health’s Rhapsody spin-out to Hg Capital, the concurrent sale of Healthscape Advisors and Pareto Intelligence to New Mountain Capital’s Convey Health