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ISL: Quarantined in Goa, JFC players focus on fitness

Footballers work to schedules given by conditioning coach Adrian Dias

Bhupender Singh works out at his hotel room in Goa on Monday.


The Covid guidelines may have kept them in isolation but players from Jamshedpur FC are keeping themselves busy in fitness drills in their respective rooms in Goa, which will host the cash-rich Indian Super League (ISL) next month.

Winger Jackichand Singh, Bhupender Singh, William Lalnunfela, mid-fielders Amarjit Singh Kiyam, Isaac Vanmalsawma, left-back Ricky Lallawmawma and defender Laldinliana Renthlei, who arrived in Goa last week, are working out at the luxury rooms of Hotel Vivanta in Panaji.

The JFC players have been quarantined for 10 days at the hotel and are currently working under strength and conditioning coach Adrian Dias.

“Dias is in Mangalore and is in touch with the players via digital media (whatsapp and email). The players are following his instructions,” a member of the team management said on the condition of anonymity.

According to him, the Jamshedpur players have been given fitness schedule and are working out according to that. “It’s daily routine but the players have the liberty to fix their own timing of workout. After all, the fitness drills are taking place indoors. It would be different when all the players, including foreign recruits, begin their outdoor training later this month,” he added.

The 10 young footballers from the JFC reserves side are also working out in their respective at the hotel.

According to him, Dias is expected to land in Goa sometime next week. “Dias is an experienced strength and fitness coach who has worked with the JFC. He is very attentive on players and tries his best to keep the players in top-flight fitness. After all, fitness is the key to on-field performance,” the team management member said.  

He revealed that all the players who are in Goa went through Covid-19 tests are have tested negative. “So far things are good. All the players, including ones from the junior team, have tested negative. More tests would be conducted on the footballers,” he informed.

 He said most of the Indian and their foreign counterparts, including head coach Owen Coyle, will be in Goa later this week. “The entire squad and support staff should be in Goa by October 8. The foreign players will straightaway go into 14-day isolation at Taj Fort in Candoling (near Panjim). The off-shore players will also undergo Covid tests,” he added.

The entire JFC contigent will stay in secure bio-bubble throughout the lengthy cash-rich tournament which will stretch till March next year.

Jamshedpur FC CEO Mukul Choudhari said fitness is a main component and they want their players to be fully fit before the start of the tournament. “We want our players to be fully fit and it is good they are already working out,” he added.

Senior JFC team management members are in constant touch with head coach Owen Coyle and are giving him the necessary feedback.”Coyle is being updated about the team and related matters, including preparation of training ground at Sangola,” a source said.

Barring a player from 

‘After My Leg Was Amputated, Fitness Helped Me Focus On My Gains Instead Of Losses

Photo credit: Christine Yi
Photo credit: Christine Yi

From Women’s Health

In an effort to balance working hard with playing hard, I once took a red-eye flight back from Whistler to New York City after a big ski trip and went straight to my office where I spent a long day managing a hedge fund. By the time I hopped on the subway to head home, I was so exhausted that I lost my balance while I was exiting the train. I fell between cars, landed on the tracks, and my lower right leg was crushed beneath a wheel. I had to have a below-the-knee amputation as a result.

That was 17 years ago, and since then, I’ve undergone over 20 surgeries and seven blood transfusions—my most recent hospitalization was this past summer. At first, it was a struggle for me to walk just one city block—I didn’t have the muscular endurance or cardiovascular strength to support the prosthetic leg.

I was so tired and just felt defeated. But finally, one day, I remember thinking: Today’s the day. I’m going to try to walk farther and do it without a struggle. That’s when it finally clicked. I started walking on the treadmill, trying to imitate other people’s gait.

The first time, I was drenched with sweat and had tears streaming down my face from the pain after only 10 minutes. But I kept walking and added hills to strengthen my glutes, and eventually I could walk at 15 percent incline for an hour and a half. I was walking better and could feel myself getting stronger—and I loved it.

Photo credit: Christine Yi
Photo credit: Christine Yi

That brought on a new passion for fitness for me. Though I hadn’t worked out much before losing my leg, I used to be very athletic; in high school, I was a First Team All-League field hockey player. I’m a very competitive human being, and I hadn’t been able to flex that muscle since losing my leg. Doing so again made me so happy.

Over time, though, exercising became excruciating because the grafted skin around my limb broke down. So I finally decided to have the surgery to fix it in August. Afterward, I stayed in the hospital for 17 days and had to keep my leg suspended in the air all the time.

But throughout my recovery, I exercised every day with arm and abs workouts. The quarantine this year made me realize how important fitness is to my life; my workouts are my sanity. I was taking live Zoom classes—with instructors like Kara Liotta and Kate Hickl of KKsweat and Alison Cohen—in my hospital gown. It was the best way for me to pass the time because I was so excited to move and to move forward.

I fully think being able to stay fit and having a positive outlook go hand in hand. I’ve always been a positive person. But being stronger and being able to do these workouts, it boosts my optimism. I

Global Precision Medicine Market 2020-2030: Focus on Ecosystem, Technology, Application, and Competitive Landscape

The “Global Precision Medicine Market: Focus on Ecosystem, Technology, Application, Country Data (21 Countries), and Competitive Landscape – Analysis and Forecast, 2020-2030” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

Global Precision Medicine Market to Reach $278.61 Billion by 2030

Precision medicine refers to the medicine developed as per an individual’s genetic profile. It provides guidance regarding the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. The segmentation of the population is done depending on the genome structure of the individuals and their compatibility with a specific drug molecule.

In the precision medicine market, the application of molecular biology is to study the cause of a patient’s disease at the molecular level, so that target-based therapies or individualized therapies can be applied to cure the patient’s health-related problems.

This industry is gaining traction due to the increasing awareness about healthcare among individuals, integration of smart devices such as smartphones and tablets into healthcare, and increasing collaborations and agreements of IT firms with the diagnostics and biopharmaceutical companies for the development of precision diagnostic tools.

Within the research report, the market is segmented on the basis of product type, ecosystem application, and region, which highlight value propositions and business models useful for industry leaders and stakeholders. The research also comprises country-level analysis, go-to-market strategies of leading players, future opportunities, among others, to detail the scope and provide 360-degree coverage of the domain.

Key Topics Covered:

1 Product Definition

2 Research Scope

3 Research Methodology

4 Global Precision Medicine Market Overview

4.1 Market Definition

4.2 Precision Medicine: A Frontier in the Genesis of Patient-centric Medicine

4.3 Precision Medicine: Remodeling the One-Size-Fits-All Theory to Individually Tailored Therapy

4.4 Initiatives and Programs

4.5 Precision Medicine: Enabling Technologies and Applications

4.5.1 Innovators

4.5.1.1 3D DNA Printing

4.5.1.1.1 Introduction

4.5.1.1.2 Role of 3D DNA Printing

4.5.1.2 RNA-Seq

4.5.1.2.1 Introduction

4.5.1.2.2 Role of RNA-Seq in Precision Medicine

4.5.1.2.3 Key Players

4.5.1.3 4D Molecular Imaging

4.5.1.3.1 Introduction

4.5.1.3.2 Role of 4D Molecular Imaging in Precision Medicine

4.5.1.3.3 Key Players

4.5.2 Early Adopters

4.5.2.1 CRISPR

4.5.2.1.1 Introduction

4.5.2.1.2 Role of CRISPR in Precision Medicine

4.5.2.1.3 Key Players

4.5.2.2 Blockchain

4.5.2.3 Imaging Informatics

4.5.3 Early Majority

4.5.3.1 Artificial Intelligence (AI)

4.5.3.2 Circulating Free DNA (cfDNA)

4.5.3.3 Big Data

4.5.3.4 Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)

4.5.3.5 Health Informatics

4.5.3.6 Bioinformatics

4.5.4 Late Majority

4.5.4.1 Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR)

4.5.4.2 Microarray

4.6 COVID-19 Impact on the Global Precision Medicine Market

5 Market Dynamics

5.1 Overview

5.2 Market Drivers

5.2.1 Advancement of Sequencing Technologies

5.2.2 Rising Prevalence of Chronic Diseases

5.2.3 Growing Demand for Preventive Care

5.2.4 Shifting the Significance in Medicine, from Reaction to Prevention

5.2.5 Reducing Adverse Drug Reactions Through Pharmacogenomics Test

5.2.6 Potential to Reduce the Overall Healthcare Cost Across the Globe

5.3 Market Restraints

5.3.1 Unified Framework for Data Integration

5.3.2 Limited Knowledge about Molecular Mechanism/ Interaction

5.3.3 Lack of Robust Reimbursement Landscape

5.3.4 Regulatory Hurdles

5.4 Market Opportunities

5.4.1 Targeted Gene Therapy

5.4.2 Expansion into the Emerging Markets

5.4.3 Collaboration and Partnerships Across Value Chain to Accelerate the Market Entry

6 Industry Insights