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UK told it’s at ‘tipping point’ in virus fight

LONDON — One of the main medical advisers to the British government has warned that the country is at a “tipping point” in its battle against the coronavirus pandemic, a day before Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to announce fresh lockdown restrictions for virus hot spots in the north of England.

England’s deputy chief medical officer, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, said in a statement that the country is at a “tipping point similar to where we were in March.”

The U.K. has experienced Europe’s deadliest outbreak with more than 42,750 deaths.


Van-Tam laid out his hope that history won’t repeat itself in light of better testing and treatments, as well as greater knowledge of the virus itself.

Johnson is on Monday expected to impose additional restrictions in areas where the virus has been spreading fastest in recent weeks. Pubs and restaurants in northern cities like Liverpool for example are expected to be closed. (edited)

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— The White House doctor says President Donald Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say whether Trump had tested negative. Some medical experts are skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early.

— Trump makes speech from White House balcony, 1st appearance since return to residence

— India’s coronavirus cases top 7 million, a re on track to surpass the United States

— As a second wave of coronavirus infections hit, European nations seem not to have learned their lessons from the first surge

— House Speaker Nancy Pelosi dismisses the latest White House offer in COVID-19 aid talks but remains hopeful progress can be made toward a deal.

— Queen Elizabeth II honors the work of doctors, nurses, delivery drivers, fundraisers and volunteers during the coronavirus pandemic.

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— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

NEW DELHI — India’s confirmed coronavirus toll has crossed 7 million with a number of new cases dipping in recent weeks, even as health experts warn of mask and distancing fatigue setting in.

The Health Ministry on Sunday registered another 74,383 infections in the past 24 hours. India is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country in coming weeks, surpassing the U.S., where more than 7.7 million infections have been reported.

The ministry also reported 918 additional deaths, taking total fatalities to at least 108,334. Experts say all reported numbers seriously understate the impact of the pandemic, due to limited testing, missed cases and in some instances, concealment by authorities.

India, which has nearly 1.4 billion people, saw a steep rise in cases in July and added more than 2 million in August and another 3 million in September. But it is seeing a slower pace of coronavirus spread since mid-September, when the daily infections touched a record high of 97,894.

It’s averaging more than 70,000 new cases daily so far this month.

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WASHINGTON —

The Latest: UK Told It’s at ‘Tipping Point’ in Virus Fight | Business News

LONDON — One of the main medical advisers to the British government has warned that the country is at a “tipping point” in its battle against the coronavirus pandemic, a day before Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to announce fresh lockdown restrictions for virus hot spots in the north of England.

England’s deputy chief medical officer, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, said in a statement that the country is at a “tipping point similar to where we were in March.”

The U.K. has experienced Europe’s deadliest outbreak with more than 42,750 deaths.

Van-Tam laid out his hope that history won’t repeat itself in light of better testing and treatments, as well as greater knowledge of the virus itself.

Johnson is on Monday expected to impose additional restrictions in areas where the virus has been spreading fastest in recent weeks. Pubs and restaurants in northern cities like Liverpool for example are expected to be closed. (edited)

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— The White House doctor says President Donald Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say whether Trump had tested negative. Some medical experts are skeptical that Trump could be declared free of the risk of transmitting the virus so early.

— Trump makes speech from White House balcony, 1st appearance since return to residence

— India’s coronavirus cases top 7 million, a re on track to surpass the United States

— As a second wave of coronavirus infections hit, European nations seem not to have learned their lessons from the first surge

— House Speaker Nancy Pelosi dismisses the latest White House offer in COVID-19 aid talks but remains hopeful progress can be made toward a deal.

— Queen Elizabeth II honors the work of doctors, nurses, delivery drivers, fundraisers and volunteers during the coronavirus pandemic.

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

NEW DELHI — India’s confirmed coronavirus toll has crossed 7 million with a number of new cases dipping in recent weeks, even as health experts warn of mask and distancing fatigue setting in.

The Health Ministry on Sunday registered another 74,383 infections in the past 24 hours. India is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country in coming weeks, surpassing the U.S., where more than 7.7 million infections have been reported.

The ministry also reported 918 additional deaths, taking total fatalities to at least 108,334. Experts say all reported numbers seriously understate the impact of the pandemic, due to limited testing, missed cases and in some instances, concealment by authorities.

India, which has nearly 1.4 billion people, saw a steep rise in cases in July and added more than 2 million in August and another 3 million in September. But it is seeing a slower pace of coronavirus spread since mid-September, when the daily infections touched a record high of 97,894.

It’s averaging more than 70,000 new cases daily so far this month.

WASHINGTON — The White House doctor

Shenzhen-listed traditional medicine makers ride high on endorsement by public face of China’s fight against coronavirus



a man cutting a cake: A traditional Chinese medicine pharmacy in Weinan City, in China’s northwest Shaanxi Province. The overall industry has stalled, with only 17 out of 68 TCM makers recording year-on-year growth in revenue in the first half of 2020. Photo: Xinhua


A traditional Chinese medicine pharmacy in Weinan City, in China’s northwest Shaanxi Province. The overall industry has stalled, with only 17 out of 68 TCM makers recording year-on-year growth in revenue in the first half of 2020. Photo: Xinhua

Two Shenzhen-listed makers of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Shijiazhuang Yiling Pharmaceutical and Tianjin Chase Sun Pharmaceutical, have reaped stunning gains this year, riding on endorsements by the public face of China’s successful fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

Yiling reported a 57 per cent jump in net profit to 714 million yuan (US$106 million) for the first half of 2020, while its stock price surged by as much as 245 per cent between January and mid April, hitting its highest level since it went public in 2011. Chase Sun recorded 2.8 billion yuan in revenue for the first half, a 22 per cent increase compared with the same period last year.

Their fortunes came even as growth in the overall TCM industry stalled, with only 17 out of 68 TCM makers listed in China recording year-on-year growth in revenue in the first half of 2020, according to companies’ earnings reports.

Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China.

Behind Yiling and Chase Sun’s success is their close association with Zhong Nanshan, a top mainland Chinese medical expert famous for leading the country’s coronavirus containment efforts. A pulmonologist who has also studied in the UK, Zhong is a supporter of TCM and has frequently recommended the use of traditional remedies for treating coronavirus patients.

Yiling was founded in 1992 by TCM practitioner Wu Yiling, who is famous for developing a concoction of leech, whole scorpion, centipede, soil beetle and cicada slough used to treat cardiovascular diseases.



Zhong Nanshan wearing a suit and tie: A pulmonologist who has also studied in the UK, Zhong Nanshan is a supporter of TCM. Photo: Handout


© Provided by South China Morning Post
A pulmonologist who has also studied in the UK, Zhong Nanshan is a supporter of TCM. Photo: Handout

Both Wu and Zhong are academicians at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, the highest academic title conferred by Beijing to engineers and scientists, and have collaborated since at least 2015, when Wu invited Zhong to join a 460 million yuan research lab set up for academicians by his company. In 2016, they co-founded a research centre to tackle lung diseases using TCM in the southern city of Guangzhou.

While his collaboration with Yiling is focused on research, Zhong’s association with Chase Sun has more to do with business. In April 2012, a Guangzhou-based medical foundation led by Zhong invested 3.5 million yuan in a pharmaceutical company along with Chase Sun, which invested 5 million, according to Tianyancha, a public database of business records.

Zhong has since sat on the board of the company along with Yao Xiaoqing, Chase Sun’s chairman. Founded in 1996, Chase Sun transferred a controlling stake in 2019 to the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of Chengdu, and has become a state-owned company affiliated with the city in Southwest China.

Zhong, Yiling and Chase Sun did not reply

Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight: association

By Cecile Mantovani



a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: FILE PHOTO: A nurse wearing protective gear is seen inside a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sampling room of the Synlab laboratory, at El Dorado airport in Bogota


© Reuters/LUISA GONZALEZ
FILE PHOTO: A nurse wearing protective gear is seen inside a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sampling room of the Synlab laboratory, at El Dorado airport in Bogota

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight: association

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The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey. 

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

(Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood)

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Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight – association

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

FILE PHOTO: A nurse wearing protective gear is seen inside a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sampling room of the Synlab laboratory, at El Dorado airport in Bogota, Colombia September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez/File Photo

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey.

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood

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Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight

By Cecile Mantovani

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey.

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

(Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood)

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Nurses Suffer Burn-Out, Psychological Distress in COVID Fight: Association | World News

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey.

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

(Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Canada at a Tipping Point in Fight Against Coronavirus, Says Frustrated Prime Minister Trudeau | World News

OTTAWA (Reuters) – Canada is at a tipping point in the fight against a second wave of the novel coronavirus and health care workers are increasingly swamped, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in some of his most gloomy comments on Friday.

He spoke after health officials said authorities needed to do more now to fight the pandemic since forecasts suggest the number of new infections will continue to accelerate.

Trudeau said the second wave was “really frustrating”. He and other officials are urging people not to gather in large groups next Monday on Canadian Thanksgiving, a major holiday.

“We are at a tipping point in this pandemic. Not only is the second wave under way, (but) yesterday we hit the highest daily record for cases, well above what we saw this spring,” he told a news conference.

“I know this is discouraging … the increase in new cases is putting an enormous pressure on hospitals and health care workers, who are more and more swamped.”

Health officials project the cumulative death toll could reach between 9,690 and 9,800 by Oct. 17, up from 9,557 now. Total cases could total 188,150 to 197,830 by the same date, compared to 175,559 today.

Almost 80% of cases have been recorded in Ontario and Quebec, the two most populous provinces.

Ontario will close indoor gyms and cinemas and ban restaurants from serving food indoors. The 28-day measures, which apply to the major regions of Toronto, Peel and Ottawa, start on Saturday.

Ontario could experience “worst-case scenarios seen in northern Italy and New York City” if trends continue, the provincial government said.

Trudeau’s federal government, which has already announced more than C$210 billion ($160 billion) in aid for people and businesses hit by the virus, said on Friday it would launch an improved program for enterprises having trouble pay rents.

(Additional reporting by Julie Gordon in Ottawa, Moira Warburton in Toronto and Allison Lampert in Montreal; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Grant McCool)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Texas Dems highlight health care in fight to flip state House

Texas Democrats are making health care the heart of their final pitch as they look to flip the state House, which Republicans have held since 2002.

In a “contract with Texas” that Democrats are rolling out Thursday and which was shared first with The Hill, the party is touting policies it would try to enact should it flip the net nine seats it needs to gain control of the chamber. The central pillar of the plan is expanding Medicaid in Texas, which has the highest number and rate of uninsured people in the nation, as well as boosting coverage for children and making care for women more equal. 

The party is betting that voters in the state who normally rank health care as a top issue will be even more receptive to messages around expanding coverage in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, which has hit the Lone Star State particularly hard. And after Democrats across the country won in a “blue wave” in 2018 fueled by promises to improve coverage, Texas Democrats are confident their strategy will work. 

“I think we have seen for a while now, before the pandemic, before any of us heard of coronavirus, that health care was a top-ranked issue, really across the country. Certainly in the 2018 elections, health care was a key issue that year,” said state Rep. Chris Turner, chair of the Texas House Democratic caucus. “But this year, with this pandemic, with the health care crisis that is affecting everyone, it’s just through the roof right now. People expect policymakers to address health care access.” 

The heart of the Democrats’ “Affordable Health Care for Every Texan” plan is providing coverage for 2.2 million more residents by expanding Medicaid, which the party says would also lower premiums and prescription drug prices for all Texans. Estimates from the party gauge that Texas would receive $110 billion in federal money over a decade if Medicaid is expanded. 

The plan also calls for expanding coverage for children by extending children’s Medicaid “through 12 months of continuous eligibility to align with [the Children’s Health Insurance Program].”

Lastly, Democrats look to bolster women’s health care by ensuring access to abortion — including by ensuring clinics that offer the procedure receive proper funding — and reducing maternal mortality rates, including bringing down the disproportionate rate at which Black mothers die during childbirth.

The party is also eyeing other health care-related legislation, including bills to strengthen protections for people with preexisting conditions if ObamaCare is repealed and ending surprise medical billing.

Texas Democrats have long lamented Republicans’ policies on health care in the state, including their refusal to expand Medicaid and work to curb abortion access, but indicate those efforts would face reenergized resistance if they win back the state House.

“Without the gavel, we haven’t been able to dictate the tone and tenor of what happens on the floor, so this time around we will be able to keep divisive and hurtful legislation off the floor and we’ll

Top Health & Fitness Brands Across U.S. Launch “Fight It With Fitness” Campaign

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Several of the country’s largest fitness brands today announced a new campaign called “Fight It With Fitness” – a call to action that urges American consumers to get healthy and recognize that fitness is essential to fighting the COVID-19 pandemic and to overall health and wellness. The brands, which collectively operate more than 5,900 gyms and clubs throughout the US, also committed to a 5-point pledge to help Americans stay safe while prioritizing their health and returning to the gym.

The campaign calls on Americans to take the #FightItWithFitness pledge: Take a walk, ride a bike, tap into virtual workouts from gyms and studios across the U.S., and more. Consumers are invited to share their stories online via #FightItWithFitness. And for those who are ready to return to the gym or studio, the 5-point fitness industry pledge protects the health and wellbeing of members, employees, and facilities:

  1. Maintaining social distancing
  2. Commitment to enforcing required capacity limits
  3. Enhanced sanitation protocols
  4. Adherence to local government and CDC guidelines
  5. Mask policies in line with local requirements

“The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened a physical and mental health crisis in America,” said Chuck Runyon, co-founder and CEO of Self Esteem Brands – the parent company of Anytime Fitness, Basecamp Fitness and The Bar Method – and spokesperson for the Fight It With Fitness campaign. “We are calling on Americans to join us in fighting COVID-19, diabetes, depression, obesity, hypertension, heart disease and more with exercise. In turn, we as members of the fitness industry are committed to helping Americans stay safe with our 5-point fitness pledge.”

It has never been more important for Americans to get healthy and stay healthy. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, killing one person every 36 seconds. More than 34 million Americans have diabetes. Over 40 percent of adults are classified as obese. Collectively, these conditions also increase the mortality rate of those who contract COVID-19. The time is now to fight these diseases with fitness and protect the health of all Americans.

The brands participating and encouraging Americans to #FightItWithFitness include:

  • Anytime Fitness
  • Planet Fitness
  • SnapFitness
  • F45
  • The Bar Method
  • Basecamp Fitness
  • Yogafit
  • Steele Fitness
  • Fitness on Demand

For more information on the campaign, visit: www.FightItWithFitness.org

SOURCE Self Esteem Brands

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