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5 Fitness Tips Brooke Shields Swears by to Look and Feel Stronger Than Ever at 55

Photo credit: Instagram
Photo credit: Instagram

From Prevention

  • Brooke Shields, 55, recently opened up about her fitness routine to Prevention.com.

  • The model and actress says her workouts have changed over time, especially after having a partial knee replacement at 53.

  • Shields now focuses on low-impact workouts and building stability and strength.

Brooke Shields has made her health a top priority—but when the coronavirus pandemic changed life as we knew it, she had to get creative to keep up with her fitness routine.

“When COVID hit, I couldn’t go to a gym or see a trainer, and I needed to keep some semblance of control in my life,” Shields told Prevention.com in partnership with Life Happens for Life Insurance Awareness Month.

In 2018, Shields had surgery for a partial right knee replacement. “I never thought I’d have knee problems, and I’ve got nothing but knee problems,” she says, explaining that her knee function has gotten incrementally worse over the years. Overhauling her approach to fitness has been a key aspect of her recovery.

So, she began virtually working with trainer Ngo Okafor and sharing her at-home sweat sessions on Instagram Live—building an active social media community along the way. “Doing these little workouts was sort of the only area that I felt I had an ounce of control,” she explained.

Shields took her workouts indoors throughout quarantine, using equipment you could find anywhere, like water bottles, soup cans, and resistance bands. “I’ve always maintained a very active life,” the former dancer says. “I’ve done it for health and strength reasons, because I noticed that I’m also healthier minded when I’m physically active.”

Ahead, Shields dishes on her top fitness tips at 55.

1. Learn to activate different muscle groups.

To help regain strength in her knees, Shields began educating herself with a trainer. “I really started reintroducing myself to the many different muscles we have in our bodies that lay dormant or don’t become activated,” she explains. “I started feeling much more balanced and stronger, but instead of being incredibly dominant in one area and weaker in another, I became much more overall activated as far as my muscles were concerned.”

The actress said targeting areas such as her quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, and hips has helped strengthen her knees, and focusing on her core has reduced back pain.

2. Low-impact workouts are key.

“Before I got my partial knee replacement, I worked out for a year just to prepare myself so that my recovery would be faster,” Shields says. “So I exercised to maintain the strength and the stability in and around the area that’s been the most compromised.”

The actress says her left knee now seems to be “heading towards full replacement,” so she’s working to build up strength and stability with that knee, too. “I hope that maybe I will be able to avoid a full replacement by doing every other thing that’s an option for me,” she says.

Strength and stability are key, so she focuses on low-impact workouts

Hospitals feel squeeze as coronavirus spikes in Midwest

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The coronavirus tightened its grip on the American heartland, with infections surging in the Midwest, some hospitals in Wisconsin and North Dakota running low on space and the NFL postponing a game over an outbreak that’s hit the Tennessee Titans football team.

Midwestern states are seeing some of the nation’s highest per capita rates of infection, and while federal health officials again urged some governors in the region to require masks statewide, many Republicans have resisted.

Like other states, health officials in Wisconsin had warned since the pandemic began that COVID-19 patients could overwhelm hospitals. That’s now happening for some facilities as experts fear a second wave of infections in the U.S.


A record number of people with COVID-19 were hospitalized in Wisconsin. Of those 737 patients Wednesday, 205 were in intensive care, with spikes in cases in northern parts of the state driving up the numbers. The state also reported its highest single-day number of deaths — 27 — raising the toll to 1,327.

Officials at ThedaCare, a community health system of seven hospitals, said they have exceeded capacity in the COVID-19 unit at their medical center in Appleton, about 100 miles (160 kilometers) north of Milwaukee. It’s started sending patients to other hospitals some 40 miles (64 kilometers) away.

Wisconsin health officials reported 2,319 new infections, bringing the total number to 122,274.

In North Dakota, hospitals are adding extra space amid concerns from employees about capacity. Nearly 678 COVID-19 infections per 100,000 people have been diagnosed over the past two weeks, leading the country for new cases per capita, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

A new Sanford Health hospital unit opened in the capital of Bismarck to add 14 more beds, with nearly half of those for intensive care patients. The space isn’t exclusively for coronavirus patients but could be used to treat them if needed.

Overall, North Dakota has reported 21,846 infections and 247 deaths. There are 89 people now hospitalized.

The upswing has been seen throughout the Midwest. Iowa also reported a spike in people hospitalized with the virus, to 390. Last week, the state had the nation’s sixth-highest rate of coronavirus infections per 100,000 people, according to a White House coronavirus task force report dated Sunday. It again recommended Iowa require masks statewide, which Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds has said is unnecessary.

Similarly, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt, a Republican, has said he won’t impose such a requirement. The task force report found his state is among the worst in the United States for positive coronavirus tests per 100,000 people, up 15% from a week ago.

The number of reported coronavirus cases in Oklahoma increased by 980 on Wednesday, with 13 additional deaths, state health officials said. A total of 1,031 people have died of the virus there.

The strain of the virus in the Midwest comes as President Donald Trump and his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, sparred over the pandemic during the first presidential debate. Trump defended his handling of the