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The Latest: Dr. Fauci: Avoid Large Gatherings Without Masks | World News

WASHINGTON — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious-disease expert, is again cautioning against large-scale gatherings of people without masks.

President Donald Trump is planning to convene another large crowd outside the White House on Saturday. Trump’s Rose Garden event announcing Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his Supreme Court nominee on Sept. 26 has been labeled a “super-spreader” for the coronavirus.

Fauci said of the Rose Garden event in an interview with The Associated Press on Friday: “I was not surprised to see a super-spreader event given the circumstances. Crowded, congregate setting, not wearing masks. It is not surprising to see an outbreak.”

Fauci says the CDC guideline for getting people back into society generally “is 10 days from the onset of your symptoms.”

That onset for Trump was Oct. 1, according to his doctors. The president’s White House doctor, Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley, said Trump could return to holding events on Saturday. Organizers says attendees are required to bring masks or masks will be provided for the outdoor White House event.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Dr. Fauci cautions against large gatherings without masks, social distancing ahead of President Trump’s White House event

— India coronavirus cases approach 7 million; averaging more than 70,000 daily cases this month

— Czech Republic sees surge in new daily infections at nearly 9,000

— Queen Elizabeth II honored the work of doctors and nurses, delivery drivers, fundraisers and volunteers during the coronavirus pandemic.

— China’s first classical music festival since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic is featuring musicians from the former epicenter of Wuhan.

— The NFL’s Tennessee Titans and the New England Patriots had no positive coronavirus tests Saturday and both teams will be allowed to go back to their facilities.

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

TRENTON, N.J. — Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says he’s been discharged from a New Jersey hospital where he spent a week after contracting the coronavirus.

Christie says in a Saturday post on Twitter that he’d been released from the Morristown Medical Center. He tweeted his thanks to hospital staff and says he’d “have more to say about all of this next week.”

Christie announced Oct. 3 he had tested positive and checked himself into the hospital as “an important precautionary measure,” given his history of asthma.

Christie was among several coronavirus cases connected to President Donald Trump’s inner circle. Along with Trump and first lady Melania Trump, multiple people who traveled with the president or attended his events recently contracted the virus.

PRAGUE — The Czech Republic and neighboring Slovakia have registered big jumps in new coronavirus infections, setting a new record for the fourth straight day.

The Health Ministry says the day-to-day increase reached 8,618 confirmed cases on Friday, over 3,000 more than the previous record set a day earlier in the nation of over 10 million.

The Czech Republic has had a total of 109,374

Trump to Hold White House Rally as Fauci Says Superspreader Event Occurred There | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

SATURDAY, Oct. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Even as the nation’s top infectious diseases expert said Friday that the White House experienced a “superspreader” event in the Rose Garden last month, President Donald Trump announced he will hold his first public event at the White House since testing positive for the coronavirus a week ago.

The Saturday event, which will have Trump speaking from a balcony to a crowd of supporters on the South Lawn, has already caused concern among some officials in the White House, which has been rocked by an outbreak following Trump’s diagnosis, the Washington Post reported.

Trump’s medical team has not yet released the results of Trump’s latest COVID-19 test, so it was unclear whether Trump is still contagious, the Post reported. But Trump has ignored his advisers’ calls for caution, the newspaper reported, instead playing down the virus and using his own battle with it to argue that the nation has already overcome the pandemic.

“I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet, but I’ve been retested,” he said. “And I know I’m at either the bottom of the scale or free.” He added that he has been tested for the virus “every couple of days or so.”

The lack of a negative test did not stop Trump from claiming to be cured and working from the Oval Office on Friday afternoon. Trump has been eager to escape the confines of the White House and return to his crowded rallies with the election just over three weeks away, the Post reported.

Despite Trump’s defiant stance, Dr. Anthony Fauci told CBS News Friday night that, “I think the data speaks for themselves. We had a superspreader event in the White House and it was in a situation where people were crowded together and were not wearing masks. So the data speak for themselves.”

Upper Midwest hit hard by coronavirus

Meanwhile, the new coronavirus is striking the Upper Midwest with a vengeance, as Wisconsin and the Dakotas became COVID-19 hotspots and health officials scrambled for hospital beds on Thursday.

After months where residents of those states downplayed the virus and rejected mask requirements, all three now lead all other states in new cases per capita, the Associated Press reported.

“It’s an emotional roller coaster,” said Melissa Resch, a nurse at Wisconsin’s Aspirus Wausau Hospital, which is working to add beds and reassign staff to keep up with a rising caseload of seriously ill COVID-19 patients.

“Just yesterday I had a patient say, ‘It’s OK, you guys took good care of me, but it’s OK to let me go,'” Resch told the AP. “I’ve cried with the respiratory unit, I’ve cried with managers. I cry at home. I’ve seen nurses crying openly in the hallway.”

What is unfolding in the Upper Midwest mirrors what has happened in other parts of the country since the pandemic began. In the spring, New York City hastily built field hospitals as

Coronavirus could worsen in winter, remain major threat through 2021, Fauci says

FILE - In this April 7, 2020, file photo, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks about the coronavirus in Washington. With New York City at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. and its native-born among those offering crucial information to the nation in televised briefings, the New York accent has stepped up to the mic. Fauci's science-based way of explaining the crisis at White House briefings has attracted untold numbers of fans, and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's news conferences have become must-see TV. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government’s top infectious diseases expert, speaks about the coronavirus on April 7. (Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

The COVID-19 pandemic could worsen in the winter and continue to be a looming threat through much of 2021.

That is the forecast of Dr. Anthony Fauci, the federal government’s top infectious diseases expert, in a wide-ranging discussion about the pandemic that he delivered this week to the Berkeley Forum.

Fauci warned that a sense of normality post-coronavirus may not come to the U.S. until late 2021, adding that the arrival of a vaccine will not suddenly bring the U.S. lurching back. Rather, it’ll be a gradual transition over a long period of time.

Fauci offered analysis at the Thursday forum about where we stand on the pandemic — from the importance of masks to the mistakes made by colleges, the dangers of internet disinformation and the grim toll COVID-19 is taking on nonwhite communities.

Masks may be part of a return to normal for some time

The U.S. faces two problems: The vaccine won’t be 99% effective, and a substantial proportion of Americans have indicated they will not take the inoculation.

“So let’s say you have a 75% effective vaccine, and 65% to 80% of the people want to get vaccinated: You still have a lot of people in society … that are vulnerable to be infected,” Fauci said. That means “we’re going to softly go into a graded degree of normality.”

In this new normal, more types of businesses will be able to reopen. But some pandemic protections may still be needed for a longer period than others.

“Will people have to wear masks? Yes, likely,” Fauci said. “I would imagine that if we get a good vaccine now, that we could have some degree of normality in the third quarter to the fourth quarter of 2021.

“I think ultimately, we will get back to normality as we knew it before this. But … it’s going to be a gradual process, in which the restrictions on things — restaurant numbers, theater attendance, spectators at sports [events] — all of that will come back gradually. But it will come back.”

We could be in for a tough winter

At the moment, the U.S. is still diagnosing about 40,000 new infections of the coronavirus daily — “which is unacceptably high,” Fauci said, as the nation moves into the cooler seasons.

“We’ve got to get that down or otherwise, we’re going to have a very tough winter in the next few months,” Fauci said.

According to the Los Angeles Times’ coronavirus tracker, California has averaged about 3,300 new coronavirus cases a day for the last week — a number that’s still higher than during the initial springtime wave of cases that prompted the state’s first stay-at-home order.

Los Angeles County on Wednesday reported its highest daily count of coronavirus infections since Aug. 22, highlighting the continued dangers of the virus even as more businesses are opening up.

Fauci calls White House outbreak a coronavirus superspreader event

More than 150 people gathered in the White House’s Rose Garden on September 26 to see President Donald Trump officially nominate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Most of them were maskless. Many hugged or shook hands as they mingled in close proximity.

Some attendees even celebrated inside the White House, without masks.

According to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the nomination ceremony was a coronavirus superspreader event. The term refers to a circumstance in which one person infects a disproportionately large number of others, often during a large gathering.

“The data speak for themselves,” Fauci told CBS News in a radio interview on Friday.

Within five days of the event, both the president and the first lady, Melania Trump, were diagnosed with COVID-19. The outbreak has hit at least 34 people in the president’s orbit, including White House staffers, bodyguards, and family members, as well as pastors, journalists, GOP senators, and advisors.

The identity of the person or people who were first infected, however, is unknown.

Defining a superspreader

rose garden barrett

Judge Amy Coney Barrett speaks in the White House’s Rose Garden on September 26 after President Donald Trump nominated her to the Supreme Court.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty


The term superspreader refers to an infected person who transmits the virus to more people than the average patient does. For the coronavirus, that average number, known as R0 (pronounced “R-naught”), has seemed to hover between 2 and 2.5. So anyone who passes the virus to three people or more could be considered a superspreader.

A superspreader event, then, is a set of circumstances that facilitates excessive transmission. In one well-known example, a person transmitted the virus to 52 others during a choir practice in March in Mount Vernon, Washington.

A superspreader event in Arkansas that month involved a pastor and his wife who attended church events a few days before they developed symptoms. Of the 92 people there, 35 got sick. Seven had to be hospitalized, and three died.

In that sense, it’s not so much that individual people are innate superspreaders — it’s the type of activity that enables a person to pass the virus to lots of people.

Those activities generally involve large gatherings — often indoors — in which lots of people from different households come into close, extended contact, such as religious services or parties.

“You can’t have a superspreading event unless there are a lot of people around, so you have to be very careful still about gatherings of people of any size,” William Schaffner, an infectious-disease expert at Vanderbilt University, previously told Business Insider.

rose garden barrett

Attorney General William Barr, right, says goodbye to former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie at the Rose Garden event on September 26.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty


Rachel Graham, an assistant epidemiology professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said most Rose Garden ceremony attendees weren’t doing anything to mitigate virus transmission.

“They’re doing pretty

Dr. Fauci Is Convinced the White House Hosted a ‘Superspreader Event’

Dr. Anthony Fauci echoed what many Americans have already concluded: Donald Trump’s recent Rose Garden ceremony was a “superspreader” event.

Fauci, a leading member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, made the assertion during an interview with CBS News’ Steven Portnoy on Friday, about a week after the president confirmed he had tested positive for COVID-19. The event in question was held for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, whom Trump nominated to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. Photos and videos taken during the ceremony showed high-profile figures and administration members without proper face coverings and in clear defiance of social distancing guidelines.

Since the event, at least 34 people within the president’s orbit have tested positive for the disease.

“I think the — the data speaks for themselves,” Fauci said. “It was in a situation where people were crowded together, not wearing masks. We had a superspreader event at the White House. So the data speak for themselves.”

CBS News Radio · CBS News Radio Interview: Dr. Anthony Fauci

Fauci, who is also the longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, then addressed Trump’s use of the word “cure” while touting the benefits of an antibody cocktail by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

“We don’t have any indication — I think you really have to depend on what you mean by a ‘cure,’ because that’s a word that leads to a lot of confusion,” Fauci said. “We have good treatments for people with advanced disease who are in the hospital.”

Just two days after Trump was released from Walter Reed Medical Center, he released a video insisting he was feeling “like perfect.” The president recently said he might hold a couple of in-person events this weekend; However, Fauci told CBS News that those are unlikely to happen if Trump doesn’t undergo further testing.

“I can tell you, they are going to be testing him to determine the trajectory and whether he gets to the point where he’s not infected,” Fauci said. “I don’t know all the other stuff you were just saying. But I can guarantee you that they will be testing him before they let him go out.”

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Fauci: ‘We had a superspreader event in the White House’

Anthony FauciAnthony FauciThe Hill’s Morning Report – Sponsored by Facebook – Pence, Harris spar over COVID-19 during policy-focused debate Eric Trump claims his father ‘literally saved Christianity’ Overnight Health Care: Trump works from Oval Office after COVID-19 diagnosis | GOP frustrated by Trump’s messages on aid | Eli Lilly asks for emergency authorization of antibody treatment MORE, the government’s top infectious disease expert, said Friday that there was a “superspreader event” at the White House late last month, a stark assessment of the string of positive coronavirus cases among the president and top aides.

“Well, I think the data speak for themselves. We had a superspreader event in the White House, and it was in a situation where people were crowded together and were not wearing masks,” Fauci told CBS News Radio.

His remarks came in response to a question about the lack of mask-wearing at the White House, and whether testing alone could stop the virus from spreading.

At least 34 White House staffers and contacts have been infected, according to a Federal Emergency Management Agency memo obtained by ABC News.

The string of cases has included President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Trump chastises Whitmer for calling him ‘complicit’ in extremism associated with kidnapping scheme Trump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis MORE, first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpDeadline accidentally publishes story about Pence being diagnosed with COVID-19 Karen Pence’s office defends her appearing without a mask at debate Surgeon general cited for taking pictures in Hawaii park closed to prevent virus spread MORE, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany and top advisers like Stephen MillerStephen MillerTrump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis Deadline accidentally publishes story about Pence being diagnosed with COVID-19 Overnight Defense: Pentagon retracing steps of top officials after positive coronavirus case | Trump suggests Gold Star families could have infected him | VP debate brings up military topics MORE and Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksTrump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis Deadline accidentally publishes story about Pence being diagnosed with COVID-19 Overnight Defense: Pentagon retracing steps of top officials after positive coronavirus case | Trump suggests Gold Star families could have infected him | VP debate brings up military topics MORE.

Many of the individuals who have tested positive attended a Sept. 26 event at the White House where Trump announced the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The event featured a crowd of people sitting close together in the White House Rose Garden, with many not wearing masks, as well as indoor activities.

The Washington Post reported Thursday that after an initial delay, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now playing a limited role in helping with contact tracing for the White House outbreak.

The D.C. health department, as well jurisdictions in Maryland and Virginia, on Thursday issued

Fauci: There could be 300,000 to 400,000 Covid deaths unless precautions taken

Fauci added that a vaccine likely won’t be widely available until next summer or fall. That timeline is in line with a prediction by CDC Director Robert Redfield, who warned the Senate Appropriations Committee last month that it would take about six to nine months to vaccinate the public once a vaccine is approved.

Moncef Slaoui, the scientific leader of the government program rushing through vaccine development, wrote in August that 300 million vaccine doses could be available by the middle of next year.

Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, also said during the New Yorker Festival on Monday that normal life may not resume until the end of 2021 due to the challenges of distributing the vaccine.

During his AU talk, Fauci also addressed recent public skepticism toward him. Though numerous polls over the summer found overwhelming bipartisan confidence in the infectious disease expert, faith in him has since started to wane, particularly among Republicans.

“Maybe 50% of you hate me because you think I’m trying to destroy the country, but listen to me for six weeks or so, and do what I say, and you’ll see the numbers go down,” Fauci said, according to the university.

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Fauci warns president may relapse as deaths could double

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President Donald Trump returned to the White House after three days at Walter Reed. He removed his mask on the steps of the balcony.

USA TODAY

President Donald Trump rolled out of Walter Reed hospital confidently urging the nation not to fear the coronavirus despite experts warning the U.S. death toll, at more than 210,000, could almost double by year’s end.

Experts also warn that the commander-in-chief himself may not have seen the worst of the virus just yet.

“Don’t be afraid of Covid,” Trump tweeted hours before his release Monday following a three-day hospital stay. “Don’t let it dominate your life.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert who for months has exhorted the nation to wear masks and social distance, told CNN that, while not likely, Trump could still face “a reversal – meaning, going in the wrong direction and get into trouble.”

Those $100 “Trump Beat COVID” commemorative coins being offered by a White House-themed online gift shop could be too soon. The danger window can easily stretch to 10 days, said Dr. Mangala Narasimhan, an intensive care physician in New Hyde Park, N.Y. 

“Saying that he beat COVID now is extremely premature, especially for someone his age,” Narasimhan told USA TODAY on Tuesday. “He is not out of the woods yet.”

From COVID-19 to voting: Trump the nation’s single largest disinformation source?

More: A visual guide to President Donald Trump’s COVID-19 treatment

Trump, 74, tweeted that the U.S., under his administration, has developed “some really great drugs & knowledge.” 

Dr. Lucy McBride, an internal medicine physician at Foxhall Internists in Washington, D.C., says professionals do know a lot more about the coronavirus today than they did in March but still don’t have drugs to prevent hospitalization and severe illness.

“We have a long way to go on therapeutics – drugs,” she said. “The best defense against the virus is our own behavior – masks, distancing, avoiding crowded spaces, and handwashing – as we buy time for drug development.”

White House physician Sean Conley said Trump would continue taking the antiviral drug remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone at the White House, where he will receive “24/7 world-class medical care.” The president tweeted that he feels better than “I did 20 years ago!”

That, Narasimhan said, could be the steroids talking.

“I am very worried that people will take this to mean that ‘If he can beat COVID I can beat COVID,'” said Narasimhan, senior vice president for critical care services at Northwell Health. “I don’t think that we can take any real lessons (from Trump’s illness) except that he did get sick. Pretending this is not real disease will not help.”

Much of the nation does not have “world-class” medical care. That is particularly true among lower-income Americans and people of color – those most at risk for poor outcomes from the virus.

Many underinsured Americans get sick but will never seek professional treatment, Narasimhan said. She said Trump had at least six doctors focusing on

Trump misinformation; Moderna vaccine; SNL; Fauci masks

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Here are three ways consumers can help support small businesses who are struggling financially during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Despite President Donald Trump repeatedly assuring the nation that a vaccine would be approved before Election Day, a key vaccine developer said Thursday that theirs won’t be released to the public until March 2021 at the earliest. 

Meanwhile, Dr. Anthony Fauci rebutted some of the president’s claims during Tuesday’s debate with former vice president Joe Biden, telling ABC News his views on masks were “taken out of context.”

A new study out of Cornell found that Trump is the “single largest” transmitter of misinformation surrounding COVID-19, touting false “miracle cures” and giving credence to dubious claims about the origins of the virus. 

“Saturday Night Live,” which is set to come back this week, may be in some hot water with the state of New York. The show’s producers announced that it would welcome a live audience for the recording despite regulations prohibiting most live audiences. A spokesman for the state’s health department said “that restriction has not changed.”

Some significant developments:

  • Globally, September was the worst month for India during the pandemic. The country reported 86,821 new coronavirus cases and 1,181 fatalities on Thursday. 
  • Researchers from Kansas State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have found that mosquitoes cannot transmit COVID-19.
  • The NFL postponed the Tennessee Titans’ scheduled game Sunday against the Pittsburgh Steelers indefinitely following an outbreak with Titans’ staff and players.
  • As of Wednesday, seven states set records for new cases in a week while three states had a record number of deaths in a week.

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 7.2 million cases and over 207,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Globally, there have been 34 million cases and more than 1 million fatalities.

📰 What we’re reading: Colby College in Waterville, Maine, is running one of the nation’s most rigorous COVID-19 testing programs. So far, it’s working to keep coronavirus cases at bay while colleges across the nation are experiencing outbreaks.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak, state by state.

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

American, United flight attendants bid tearful goodbyes as they’re furloughed

The day the airline industry didn’t want to see coming is here: Oct. 1, when 32,000 American Airlines and United Airlines employees have been furloughed after lawmakers and the White House failed to agree on a broad pandemic relief package, including more federal aid for airlines.

American Airlines flight attendant Breaunna Ross, 29, delivered a tearful goodbye to passengers over the intercom on a flight before she was furloughed. Her video went viral, receiving over 140,000 views.

“I will never forget seeing your faces today,” she said. “Thank you from the bottom of my heart for the kindness shown on today’s flight.”

Executives from both American and United said that they would reverse the furloughs if airline aid were