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Eric Trump falsely calls president’s coronavirus treatment a vaccine

President Trump’s son Eric on Sunday called his father’s treatment for COVID-19 a vaccine that he further claimed the president helped create from “day one.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Eric Trump falsely calls president's coronavirus treatment a vaccine


© Getty Images
Eric Trump falsely calls president’s coronavirus treatment a vaccine

“My father literally started day one creating this vaccine. He worked to push this vaccine and now my father just took it and you see how well he got over it,” Eric Trump told ABC “This Week’s” Jon Karl.

“Wait, wait,” Karl interrupted before Eric Trump said that Americans should be inspired and proud by what doctor’s call his father’s speedy recovery from an illness that has killed more than 214,000 and infected 7.7 million people in the U.S. alone.

“Can you clarify that you said your father just took a vaccine?” Karl asked.

“Meaning when he was at Walter Reed. The medicines that he was taking,” Eric Trump answered, before adding that until his father went to the hospital, “he felt horrible.”

President Trump’s doctors said that he was given a steroid in response to low oxygen levels, the antiviral drug Remdesivir and an experimental antibody therapy from Regeneron.

There is no approved or authorized vaccine for COVID-19 in the U.S. or in the world. Several companies and research teams globally are in a multi-billion dollar race to develop a vaccine, hoping that one might be delivered by early 2021.

President Trump was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 2 after announcing early that morning that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for coronavirus. His doctors eventually admitted that the president was given oxygen at the White House before he was taken on Marine One to the hospital.

Eric Trump said on Sunday by the very next day his father sounded “tremendous,” the same day doctors said the president once again had to be given oxygen at Walter Reed.

“I spoke to him three times that next Saturday. The guy sounded 100 percent. It was amazing,” Eric Trump said.

Doctors and White House staff sent a series of conflicting messages on the president’s health throughout that weekend. The president was also criticized for leaving his hospital room that Sunday for a drive to wave to supporters while he was infected with the highly contagious virus.

On Monday, President Trump was discharged from the hospital, returning to the White House that evening where he walked up the South Portico stairs to the Truman Balcony and took off his mask before walking inside the residence where some of his staff could be seen.

Eric Trump on Sunday lauded his father’s personal efforts in pushing for a vaccine, without acknowledging that doctors never said his father took a vaccine, and instead was offered a cocktail of experimental therapeutics.

“It actually probably goes to speak to how good some of these vaccines are that are being created,” Eric Trump told ABC. “What my father’s done on the vaccine front no one could have done. No one could have

Trump falsely dismisses virus danger: ‘You catch it, you get better, and you’re immune’

The president’s continued effort to minimize the danger comes as more than 211,000 American lives have died from the virus that continues to spread in many parts of the U.S., including inside the White House and within the ranks of his own administration.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses atop the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from being hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) treatment, Oct. 5, 2020.

President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses atop the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from being hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) treatment, Oct. 5, 2020.

President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses atop the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from being hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) treatment, Oct. 5, 2020.

Even as he touted the Regeneron antibody treatment he’s taken as a “cure,” without evidence, he portrayed his hospitalization as having been unnecessary and suggested he could have “would have done it fine without drugs.”

“I didn’t have to go in frankly, I think it would have gone away by itself,” Trump said.

The president’s confidence in his condition comes after he was twice administered oxygen in recent days as he has fought the virus and seemed to confirm he is still being treated with a steroid, even as he said he is off all other medications.

“I think I’m taking almost nothing,” Trump said. “I think you go a little bit longer on, they have steroid, it’s not heavy steroid, they have that go a little bit longer, but I am not taking, I am almost not taking anything. I feel great.”

The White House and the president’s doctors have refused to answer basic questions about Trump’s illness and treatments, such as when he last tested negative for COVID-19 before he received a positive test and what impact the virus has had on his lungs.

“I will be tested very soon, but I am essentially very clean, they say it’s over a period of six, seven days, and I was — you know amazing thing happened to me I just went in, I didn’t feel good. And that’s OK, I expected that at some point,” Trump said, likening the virus to a “microscopic piece of dust.”

Despite not having been tested, the president said he doesn’t think he is contagious “at all anymore” and said he is feeling so well that he would like to do a rally tonight and felt he could have done one last night.

The president said whether or not he is contagious, if he were at a rally

Gov. Cuomo falsely claims New York nursing homes ‘never needed’ to take in Covid-positive patients

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that nursing homes “never needed” to accept Covid-positive patients from hospitals in the state due to a shortage of hospital beds.



Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: NEW YORK, NY - JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)


© Jeenah Moon/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY – JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)

During a press call Wednesday, Finger Lakes News Radio asked Cuomo about his administration’s advisory in late March requiring that nursing homes accept the readmission of patients from hospitals, even if they were positive for Covid-19.

The governor’s office has repeatedly said the advisory was based on federal guidance, which prohibited discrimination based on a coronavirus diagnosis. The state’s Department of Health told CNN, “Residents were admitted to nursing homes during that time not as an overflow facility, but because that’s where they live.”

Cuomo said that the advisory was a precaution if hospitals became overwhelmed — calling it an “anticipatory rule” — which he said didn’t happen.

“We never needed nursing home beds because we always had hospital beds,” Cuomo told Finger Lakes News. “So it just never happened in New York where we needed to say to a nursing home, ‘We need you to take this person even though they’re Covid-positive.’ It never happened.”

Facts First: Cuomo’s assertion that “it never happened” is false. According to a report from the New York State Department of Health, “6,326 COVID-positive residents were admitted to [nursing home] facilities” following Cuomo’s mandate that nursing homes accept the readmission of Covid-positive patients from hospitals. Whether or not this was “needed,” it did in fact happen.

Cuomo’s senior adviser Rich Azzarpodi replied Thursday after publication and took issue with this determination, saying that the governor was specifically referencing the hospital bed shortage. “The governor was crystal clear, he was saying that what did not materialize was the crunch for hospital beds, that every projection especially the federal governments projections predicted was going to happen. That’s what he said never happened. Separately the law has always been that nursing homes could only accept residents that they could adequately care for. None of that has changed.”

On March 25, the state’s Health Department issued an advisory requiring nursing homes to accept “the expedited receipt of residents returning from hospitals” if the patients were deemed medically stable.

“No resident shall be denied re-admission or admission to the [nursing home] solely based on a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19,” the advisory stated. “[Nursing homes] are prohibited from requiring a hospitalized resident who is determined medically stable to be tested for COVID-19 prior to admission or readmission.”

This mandate received a great deal of criticism, and Cuomo issued an