Showing: 1 - 4 of 4 RESULTS

Want Better Rapport With Your Cat? Bat Your Eyes | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) — When it comes to bonding with your cat, the eyes have it.

Narrowing your eyes — the so-called “slow blink” — may make humans more attractive to their feline friends, British researchers suggest. It also may make kitty smile back.

“As someone who has both studied animal behavior and is a cat owner, it’s great to be able to show that cats and humans can communicate in this way. It’s something that many cat owners had already suspected, so it’s exciting to have found evidence for it,” said Karen McComb. She studies animal behavior at the University of Sussex School of Psychology in the United Kingdom.

McComb said the study is the first to investigate the role of slow blinking in communication between people and cats.

It’s easy: Just narrow your eyes as you would in a relaxed smile, then close your eyes for a couple of seconds. “You’ll find they respond in the same way themselves and you can start a sort of conversation,” she said in a university news release.

In one experiment, the researchers found that cats are more likely to slow blink after their owners have slow blinked at them, compared with when they don’t interact at all.

In a second experiment, cats were more likely to approach a researcher’s outstretched hand after the researcher had slow blinked than when he or she had a neutral expression.

According to study co-author Tasmin Humphrey, a doctoral student, “Understanding positive ways in which cats and humans interact can enhance public understanding of cats, improve feline welfare, and tell us more about the socio-cognitive abilities of this understudied species. Our findings could potentially be used to assess the welfare of cats in a variety of settings, including veterinary practices and shelters.”

But why do cats behave this way?

Humphrey offered a theory: “Cats may have learned that humans reward them for responding to slow blinking. It is also possible that slow blinking in cats began as a way to interrupt an unbroken stare, which is potentially threatening in social interaction.”

The findings were published online Oct. 7 in the journal Scientific Reports.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source Article

Pelosi eyes creation of panel to determine a president’s fitness to serve

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Jamie Raskin unveiled a bill Friday that would create a standing committee to evaluate the mental or physical capacity of any sitting president.

They said the legislation was not intended to remove the current president from office before the election, but to set out a process stemming from the 25th Amendment.

“This is not about President Trump. He will face the judgment of the voters,” Mrs. Pelosi, California Democrat, said. “He shows the need for us to create a process for future presidents.”

“This isn’t about any judgment that anybody has about someone’s behavior. This is about a diagnosis,” she added.

The 25th Amendment provides for the transfer of presidential power in the case of removal from office, death, or disability. Congress, the president’s cabinet, and the vice president have the power to remove a president unable to serve, but it would take a 2/3 vote in both chambers to be implemented.

This bill would address Congress’ authority, by creating a bipartisan, bicameral 17-member committee to review the president’s ability to fulfill the duties of the office — and to ensure a smooth transfer of power in drastic situations.

Mr. Raskin, Maryland Democrat, said this legislation was particularly important in the age of COVID-19, which has infected several members of government, including Mr. Trump.

“When I found that the body had never been set up and I guess the reason is that there’s never really a good time to do it, because its always seen in its local circumstance as opposed to the need to have this institutionally,” Mr. Raskin said. “The situation has focused everybody’s mind on the need for following through on this suggestion in the 25th Amendment.”

The proposal has no chance of being enacted as it would have to be passed by the GOP-controlled Senate and then signed into law by the president himself.

In recent days, Mrs. Pelosi has repeatedly questioned the president’s mental health given his coronavirus diagnosis but said it wasn’t her place to determine if the 25th Amendment was appropriate.

“What I said about the president and the drugs was there are those who believe taking certain medications can affect [your] judgment. I don’t know,” she said.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

fbq('init', '329974197684672'); fbq('init', '450591302454597');

fbq('track', "PageView"); fbq('track', 'ViewContent');

fbq('trackSingle', '450591302454597' , 'Subscribe', {value: '0.00', currency: 'USD', predicted_ltv: '0.00'});

Source Article

New Coronavirus Can Infect Your Eyes as Well as Your Lungs | Health News

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) — COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory infection, but experts have suspected the virus can also infiltrate the eyes. Now, scientists have more direct evidence of it.

The findings are based on a patient in China who developed an acute glaucoma attack soon after recovering from COVID-19. Her doctors had to perform surgery to treat the condition, and tests of her eye tissue showed evidence of SARS-CoV-2.

The case offers proof that “SARS-CoV-2 can also infect ocular tissues in addition to the respiratory system,” the doctors reported in the Oct. 8 online edition of the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.

“It’s been suspected that the eyes can be a source of both ‘in’ and ‘out'” for the novel coronavirus, said Dr. Aaron Glatt, a spokesman for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

That’s why health care workers protect their eyes with goggles or face shields, he noted.

It’s not possible to say whether the patient in this case contracted SARS-CoV-2 via her eyes, according to Glatt. But that is a possibility — whether through viral particles in the air or by touching her eyes with a virus-contaminated hand, he said.

Another big unknown is whether any lingering virus in patients’ eye tissue will cause problems.

According to Dr. Grace Richter, an ophthalmologist at the University of Southern California’s Roski Eye Institute in Los Angeles, “It’s too early to know what having this virus floating around in the eye means for ocular health.”

At this point, Richter said, limited eye problems have been seen with COVID-19: A small number of patients develop conjunctivitis (“pink eye”), where the white part of the eye and inside of the eyelid become swollen, red and itchy.

The patient in this case suffered acute angle-closure glaucoma — a serious condition in which pressure in the eyes suddenly rises due to fluid buildup. It requires prompt treatment to relieve the pressure, sometimes with surgery to restore the eye’s normal fluid movement.

Richter was doubtful the coronavirus directly caused the eye complication. In general, certain anatomical features of the eye make some people vulnerable to acute angle-closure glaucoma, and it can be triggered by medications, she explained.

Richter speculated that since the patient was hospitalized and likely received various drugs, that might have been the cause.

That is possible, agreed Dr. Sonal Tuli, a clinical spokeswoman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and chairwoman of ophthalmology at the University of Florida College of Medicine, in Gainesville.

Tuli said the patient’s case is “interesting,” but leaves open a number of questions. One is whether the virus present in the eye tissue is actually infectious.

The patient was a 64-year-old woman who was hospitalized for COVID-19 on Jan. 31. Eighteen days later, her symptoms had fully resolved, and throat swabs turned up negative for SARS-CoV-2.

About a week later, though, she developed pain and vision loss in one eye, and then in her other eye a few days afterward, according

Pelosi eyes 25th Amendment panel to assess presidential capacity

Pelosi plans to introduce legislation to create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment to assess the president’s capacity to hold office.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled legislation Friday that would allow Congress to intervene under the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to remove the president, insisting it’s not about President Donald Trump but inspired by the need for greater congressional oversight of his White House.

Pelosi has been raising questions about Trump’s mental fitness since his COVID-19 diagnosis and demanding more transparency about his health. The bill would set up a commission to assess the president’s ability to lead the country and ensure a continuity of government. It comes one year after Pelosi’s House launched impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“This is not about President Donald Trump — he will face the judgment of the voters,” Pelosi said at a press conference at the Capitol.

Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, with no hopes of the bill becoming law, the rollout was quickly dismissed as a stunt by Trump’s team and top allies.

“It’s an absurd proposal,” said White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Fox.

“Absolutely absurd,” said Senate Majority Leader McConnell during an appearance in Shepherdsville, Kentucky.

The president’s opponents have discussed invoking the 25th Amendment for some time, but are raising it now, so close to Election Day, as the campaigns are fast turning into a referendum on Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.


Pelosi said Trump needs to disclose more about his health after his COVID-19 diagnosis and when, exactly, he first contracted COVID as others in the White House have become infected. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more have tested positive for the virus, which shows no signs of abating heading into what public health experts warn will be a difficult flu season and winter.

The legislation that would create a commission as outlined under the 25th Amendment, which was passed by Congress and ratified in 1967 as a way to ensure a continuity of power in the aftermath of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

It says the vice president and a majority of principal officers of the executive departments “or of such other body as Congress” may by law provide a declaration to Congress that the president “is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” At that point, the vice president would immediately assume the powers of acting president.

“Let Congress exert the power the Constitution gave us,” Pelosi said Friday standing before a poster of the amendment.

Pelosi was joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a constitutional scholar, who has proposed similar bills in the past.

“In times of chaos we must hold fast to our Constitution,” he said Friday.

Raskin said the commission would be launched “only for the most extreme situations.”

But, as Congress showed by impeaching — and acquitting the president over the past year — the legislative branch is determined to exert itself at times as a check on