Showing: 1 - 8 of 8 RESULTS

Social media helps mom spot rare cancer in her baby’s eye

A mom who followed her instincts is the reason her daughter is now being treated for cancer in her eye.

It was July 30, Jasmine Martin told “Good Morning America,” when she saw it. Prior to that day, she said, there had been “a small glow” in her daughter Sariyah’s eye. “But that day, it was like a moon.”

MORE: My son died from open-air carbon monoxide poisoning: Here’s what parents need to know

She posted the photo to Facebook looking for advice. Several people commented it could be cancerous.

Martin took her daughter to the pediatrician, who told the Knoxville, Tennessee, mom it was nothing to worry about. But Martin’s instincts told her otherwise.

“It was going to take weeks to get an ophthalmologist appointment,” Martin told “GMA.” So, she said she emailed the photo to a friend who worked at a hospital, who in turn showed it to a doctor.

MORE:A grandpa’s note, a bucket of baseballs and an emotional tweet

“She was taken to St. Jude’s that night,” Martin told “GMA.”

Since then, little Sariyah has been diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma. Retinoblastoma is, according to the St. Jude’s web site, a rare form of cancer affecting about 250-300 children each year. It “typically develops in children before 5 years of age. This cancer develops in the retina — the part of the eye that helps a person see color and light. Retinoblastoma may affect one or both eyes. In about two-thirds of all cases only one eye is affected,” the website reads.

There’s been strides forward and steps back for the 17-month-old and her family. Though the toddler was released from the hospital and sent home in late September, there’s cause for concern: a tiny spot in her left eye that had been laser treated has returned. At the same time, the tumor in her right eye, the one with the large glow, is shrinking.

Martin wrote in her most recent Instagram update, “We are so early in this but … days are mentally draining, because you just never know what they are going to find. It’s hard and it’s scary. If I allow myself to really think about it, if something happens to the good eye, then there’s still so many risks with the right eye. It’s a never ending battle of what ifs right now.”

Sariyah is “so happy,” her mom said, “You wouldn’t even know she is going through this,” she said, referring to hospital stays and chemotherapy. “Even when it makes her sick and she has a fever she’s still playing with her siblings,” Martin told “GMA.”

Friends and neighbors have stepped up to help the family through this difficult time, something Martin said has touched her. From meal trains to a car, “there are so many good people in the world,” she told “GMA.”

She’s hopeful sharing her Sariyah’s story, which she does both on Instagram and Facebook. will encourage mothers to follow their instincts when it comes to their

The medical facts about Mike Pence’s debate red eye

Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday night managed to make it to the debate stage despite the fact the White House is in the middle of a coronavirus outbreak that seems to continue to grow. 

During the debate against Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, Pence’s left eye quickly became the talk of the internet after people noticed it appeared to be red and blurry throughout his performance.

While it’s not clear why the vice president’s eye looked a bit off and he recently tested negative for COVID-19, it prompted many users to speculate on whether it could be an indication Pence may be infected with the coronavirus, as pink eye is known to be a symptom. 

 

Typical symptoms of the coronavirus include fever, cough, nasal congestion, sore throat, fatigue and shortness of breath, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Although it’s true conjunctivitis has been seen in coronavirus patients, it appears to be a rare occurrence. 

A meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medical Virology in May found conjunctivitis occurs in about 1.1 percent of all COVID-19 cases. 

The study found pink eye was more common in severe coronavirus cases. The symptom was seen in 3 percent of severe cases compared to just 0.7 percent of mild cases. 

Conjunctivitis can be highly contagious and is typically caused by bacteria and adenoviruses that can spread easily from person to person, so COVID-19 is certainly not the only possible infectious cause of eye redness. 

It’s also a giant leap to make the claim Pence was experiencing pink eye to begin with, let alone that it was brought on by the coronavirus. Redness in the eyes can be caused by a long list of possibilities such as dry eyes, allergies and broken blood vessels in the eye. 

As President Trump and several other White House officials, aides and advisers have tested positive for COVID-19 over the past week, Pence tested negative for the virus on Tuesday and “has remained healthy, without any COVID-19 symptoms,” according to his physician Jess Schonau. 

Source Article

Debate Watchers Are Convinced Mike Pence Has Pink Eye

There was quite a bit to unpack during Wednesday night’s Vice-Presidential debate—one that has gained more significance in recent days following President Donald Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis. However, while many focused on what both Mike Pence and Kamala Harris had to say, something else  (besides a fly landing on his head) took center stage when it came to the Vice-President—his left eye.

As Pence took his turn to speak at various points—or interrupted Harris during her time—several debate watchers took notice that his left eye appeared to be red, and led many to wonder what was going on.

It also became a concern as many wondered if the Vice-President was suffering from Conjunctivitis—also known as Pink Eye—which can be a symptom of a COVID-19 infection. According to the Journal of Medical Virology, 1.1% of people who had COVID-19 also developed conjunctivitis, with an additional 3.3% of those being people with severe infections and 0.7% of them having non-severe COVID. With the latest count of positive Coronavirus cases in the United States alone hitting 7,582,300, that means approximately 83,405 cases saw people developing pink eye.

The concern that Pence could have the illness gained attention because of his proximity to both the President and several other members of his inner circle—several of whom have tested positive in recent days for COVID-19. Pence was also present at the same Rose Garden event to announce Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court, which has since been labeled as a potential Super Spreader event, with many of the people in the inner circle who tested positive present, not wearing masks or social distancing.

After the President and First Lady announced they had tested positive, the Pence and his wife Karen announced they had both tested negative for the disease. Still, it didn’t stop many from speculating that Pence could have since become positive and was exhibiting symptoms.

However, Forbes points out that while the discoloration in the Vice-President’s eye could have been conjunctivitis-–which could or could not be tied to a potential COVID-19 infection—there are also several other reasons why he had redness as well, including but not limited to a range of other different infections, allergies, Blepharitis, Glaucoma, inflammatory or autoimmune disease, reaction to medications, crying, dry eyes, irritation by a foreign substance, injury or broken blood vessels.

The Vice-President has not spoken out about the discoloration in his eye as of press time.

US Vice President Mike Pence during the vice presidential debate US Vice President Mike Pence during the vice presidential debate Photo: AFP / Eric BARADAT

Source Article

Alcon Celebrates World Sight Day 2020 and Continues Commitment to Improving Worldwide Access to Eye Care

  • Ongoing donation efforts deliver equipment and medical supplies needed for increasingly important eye care services and procedures to help underserved patients during the pandemic

  • Associates around the world participate in the Steps for Sight Challenge to help improve access to quality eye care

  • New Alcon Foundation video PSA highlights the importance of eye health screenings, premiering at this year’s American Academy of Optometry (AAO) annual meeting

Alcon (SIX/NYSE: ALC), the global leader in eye care dedicated to helping people see brilliantly, today celebrates World Sight Day through its corporate giving and company-led initiatives focused on improving access to quality eye care. In the spirit of this year’s theme, “Hope in Sight,” Alcon associates will help spark donations to global nonprofit organizations that advance eye health. The goal is to support people around the world in need of eye care, particularly as eye health issues, including vision loss, myopia, cataracts, refractive errors and more, have emerged or worsened due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“This year, our Alcon team has seen firsthand how the COVID-19 pandemic has made access to quality eye care even more challenging for communities across the globe,” said David J. Endicott, Chief Executive Officer, Alcon. “Now more than ever, Alcon is proud to partner with nonprofit eye health organizations who are working toward a common goal of improving access to eye care, including offering free eye surgeries and eye care resources to patients, as well as providing training and education to eye care providers across the world. Through these impactful initiatives, we can help improve people’s vision and inspire hope in sight.”

Celebrated annually, World Sight Day—coordinated by the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB)—is an international day of awareness to bring attention to the global issue of avoidable blindness and visual impairment. Alcon has a long-standing history of donating surgical equipment and medical supplies to NGOs and hospitals providing care to underserved patients. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many necessary eye surgeries and treatments were delayed, causing a backlog of surgeries and leaving people’s vision at risk for worsened conditions. Cornerstone Assistance Network’s Cataract Clinic— the nation’s first free cataract facility for the uninsured, located in the Dallas-Fort Worth area—saw an uptick in patient requests for cataract surgeries since the pandemic began. This World Sight Day, Alcon continues to lend support to Cornerstone Cataract Clinic by supporting surgical services for uninsured patients.

Around the world, Alcon associates are also participating in a variety of activities that support eye health awareness for World Sight Day. Most notably, the Steps for Sight Challenge is a global company initiative that challenges 2,020 associates to take 10,000 steps on World Sight Day to raise a total of $25,000 for three global eye health nonprofit organizations—long-time partner Orbis, Optometry Giving Sight and one surprise recipient to be chosen by an Alcon site.

This year, Alcon has created a video trailer as a public service announcement (PSA) to remind people of the importance of eye health and encourage scheduling

Investors eye discounted U.S. healthcare sector as Biden’s lead in polls grows

By Lewis Krauskopf



FILE PHOTO: Pharmaceutical tablets and capsules are arranged on a table in this picture illustration taken in Ljubljana


© Reuters/Srdjan Zivulovic
FILE PHOTO: Pharmaceutical tablets and capsules are arranged on a table in this picture illustration taken in Ljubljana

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Investors are looking for bargains among healthcare stocks, even as prospect of a Democratic “Blue Sweep” in next month’s elections threatens more volatility for a sector already trading near a historical discount to the broader market.

Loading...

Load Error

A victory by former Vice President Joe Biden over President Donald Trump on Nov. 3 and a potential Democratic takeover of the Senate could clear the way for prescription drug price and healthcare coverage reforms, generally seen as potential negatives for companies in the sector.

Some investors are betting these factors have already been priced into healthcare shares or may not be as detrimental as feared, while the companies stand to benefit from relatively stable earnings prospects and their medical innovations.

“For high-quality companies that are trading at reasonable valuations … there is a strong argument to be made for adding some healthcare exposure to portfolios,” said James Ragan, director of wealth management research at D.A. Davidson.

Biden’s improving election prospects have weighed on healthcare stocks for much of 2020, according to investors, with the S&P 500 healthcare sector <.spxhc> climbing just 7% since the end of April, against a 17% gain for the overall S&P 500 <.spx>.

A Reuters/Ipsos poll on Sunday showed Biden opened his widest lead in a month after Trump contracted COVID-19.

The healthcare sector now trades at a 26% discount to the S&P 500 on a price-to-earnings basis, according to Refinitiv Datastream. The sector’s 15.8 P/E ratio is well below the S&P 500’s 21.3 ratio, which last month rose to its highest valuation since 2000.

The gap between the sector’s P/E ratio and that of the S&P stood at its widest in at least 25 years last month, though it has narrowed in recent weeks.

“As Biden started to do better in the polls, you saw healthcare start to underperform a bit as the rest of the market recovered,” said Ashtyn Evans, a healthcare analyst with Edward Jones.

While Biden may shake up insurance coverage by offering a “public option” government plan, he is also expected to seek to strengthen the Affordable Care Act – the signature healthcare law enacted when he was vice president – under which companies are used to operating.

Any significant drug pricing legislation may need to wait until the pandemic is more contained, as the government relies on the pharmaceutical industry to develop COVID-19 therapies and vaccines. Trump has also vowed to lower drug prices, making the issue arguably less partisan.

“We think there remains a reasonably good probability that the next Congress will institute moderate health policy changes that will create long-term clarity for the sector and investors,” Eric Potoker, an analyst at UBS Global Wealth Management, said in a note last month.

Healthcare stocks have been prone to volatility around elections.

Ahead of the 2016 vote, which pitted Trump against former Secretary of

Alcon to Showcase Innovations at #Academy20 that Support Recovery and Growth for Eye Care Practices

  • Clinical findings to be presented on PRECISION1® daily disposable contact lenses and Systane® family of dry eye products

  • Meeting attendees will have opportunity to get an exclusive demo of MARLO, Alcon’s new digital platform

  • Interactive virtual Alcon booth will offer clinical education learning lab, product innovations, an OD-to-OD live theater, a COVID-19 practice response section and more

Alcon, the global leader in eye care, will highlight leading innovations and clinical research at the 2020 American Academy of Optometry (the Academy or #Academy20) meeting taking place virtually from October 7 – 22, 2020. The company’s robust virtual program will feature updates on its most important innovations, including PRECISION1® one-day contact lenses, Systane® iLux® MGD Treatment System and digital platform MARLO, as well as 23 scientific presentations on a range of technologies.

“Now more than ever, there’s an increasing need to bolster practice growth and deliver on unmet patient needs during these challenging times,” said Sean Clark, VP/General Manager, U.S. Vision Care, Alcon. “Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Alcon has doubled down on our commitment to support Eye Care Professionals by providing tools, resources and programs to support their practices and their patients. We believe the innovations we’re bringing to this year’s Academy meeting will help our partners get back to business so we can continue helping people See Brilliantly together.”

Alcon’s virtual booth will feature a live theater offering OD-to-OD education and Q&A sessions; an in-depth learning lab; resources for Eye Care Professionals (ECPs) to help their practices recover following COVID-19 shutdowns; product innovation showcases; direct support from Alcon’s medical affairs team; a fun, interactive game center to get the full event experience at home; and, more.

Clinical Data Highlights Key Benefits of PRECISION1 Contact Lenses

Clinical findings will be presented at #Academy20, highlighting key attributes of Alcon’s latest contact lens innovation, PRECISION1. Specifically, data presented at the meeting will look at the lens’ overall performance, efficacy during digital device use and the clinical performance of a forthcoming toric version of PRECISION1. PRECISION1 meeting highlights include:

  • Friday, October 9

    • Paper Presentation: Clinical Comparison of Verofilcon A and Etafilcon A Daily Disposable Contact Lenses. Presented by Dr. Jason Miller, 3:15 – 3:30 p.m. ET

    • Poster Presentation: The subjective response to Verofilcon A Daily Disposable Contact Lenses During Extensive Digital Device Use. Presented by Dr. Marc Schulze, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. ET

    • Poster Presentation: Clinical Performance of Verofilcon A Toric Daily Disposable Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses. Presented by Dr. Wilson Movic, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. ET

    • Poster Presentation: Use of Likert Questionnaires to Compare Subjective Performance of Two Daily Disposable Soft Contact Lenses. Presented by Dr. Jason Miller, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. ET

  • Friday, October 16

    • Lunch Symposium: The Next Big Thing, featuring PRECISION1. Guest Speaker Dr. Pam Lowe, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. ET

Broadened U.S. Availability of MARLO Helps ODs Stay Connected to their Patients

Following a successful pilot, Alcon announced in August the broader U.S. availability of its innovative MARLO

White House staff, Secret Service eye virus with fear, anger

WASHINGTON (AP) — The West Wing is a ghost town. Staff members are scared of exposure. And the White House is now a treatment ward for not one — but two — COVID patients, including a president who has long taken the threat of the virus lightly.

President Donald Trump’s decision to return home from a military hospital despite his continued illness is putting new focus on the people around him who could be further exposed if he doesn’t abide by strict isolation protocols.

Throughout the pandemic, White House custodians, ushers, kitchen staff and members of the U.S. Secret Service have continued to show up for work in what is now a coronavirus hot spot, with more than a dozen known cases this week alone.


Trump, still contagious, has made clear that he has little intention of abiding by best containment practices.

As he arrived back at the White House on Monday evening, the president defiantly removed his face mask and stopped to pose on a balcony within feet of a White House photographer. He was seen inside moments later, surrounded by numerous people as he taped a video message urging Americans not to fear a virus that has killed more than 210,000 in the U.S. and 1 million worldwide.

White House spokesman Judd Deere said the White House was “taking every precaution necessary” to protect not just the first family but “every staff member working on the complex” consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and best practices. He added that physical access to the president would be significantly limited and appropriate protective gear worn by those near him.

Nonetheless, the mood within the White House remains somber, with staff fearful they may have been exposed to the virus. As they confront a new reality — a worksite that once seemed like a bubble of safety is anything but — they also have been engaged in finger-pointing over conflicting reports released about the president’s health as well as a lack of information provided internally.

Many have learned about positive tests from media reports and several were exposed, without their knowledge, to people the White House already knew could be contagious.

Indeed, it took until late Sunday night, nearly three full days after Trump’s diagnosis, for the White House to send a staff-wide note in response. Even then, it did not acknowledge the outbreak.

“As a reminder,” read the letter from the White House Management Office, “if you are experiencing any symptoms … please stay home and do not come to work.” Staff who develop symptoms were advised to “go home immediately” and contact their doctors rather than the White House Medical Unit.

Even when Trump was at the hospital, his staff was not immune to risk.

Trump had aides there recording videos and taking photographs of him. On Sunday evening, he took a surprise drive around the hospital to wave to supporters from the window of an SUV. The Secret Service agents in the car with him

With an anthropologist’s eye, Duke pioneers a new approach to medical AI

If not for an anthropologist and sociologist, the leaders of a prominent health innovation hub at Duke University would never have known that the clinical AI tool they had been using on hospital patients for two years was making life far more difficult for its nurses.

The tool, which uses deep learning to determine the chances a hospital patient will develop sepsis, has had an overwhelmingly positive impact on patients. But the tool required that nurses present its results — in the form of a color-coded risk scorecard — to clinicians, including physicians they’d never worked with before. It disrupted the hospital’s traditional power hierarchy and workflow, rendering nurses uncomfortable and doctors defensive.

As a growing number of leading health systems rush to deploy AI-powered tools to help predict outcomes — often under the premise that they will boost clinicians’ efficiency, decrease hospital costs, and improve patient care — far less attention has been paid to how the tools impact the people charged with using them: frontline health care workers.

advertisement

That’s where the sociologist and anthropologist come in. The researchers are part of a larger team at Duke that is pioneering a uniquely inclusive approach to developing and deploying clinical AI tools. Rather than deploying externally developed AI systems — many of which haven’t been tested in the clinic — Duke creates its own tools, starting by drawing from ideas among staff. After a rigorous review process that loops in engineers, health care workers, and university leadership, social scientists assess the tools’ real-world impacts on patients and workers.

The team is developing other strategies as well, not only to make sure the tools are easy for providers to weave into their workflow, but also to verify that clinicians actually understand how they should be used. As part of this work, Duke is brainstorming new ways of labeling AI systems, such as a “nutrition facts” label that makes it clear what a particular tool is designed to do and how it should be used. They’re also regularly publishing peer-reviewed studies and soliciting feedback from hospital staff and outside experts.

advertisement

“You want people thinking critically about the implications of technology on society,” said Mark Sendak, population health and data science lead at the Duke Institute for Health Innovation.

Otherwise, “we can really mess this up,” he added.

Getting practitioners to adopt AI systems that are either opaquely defined or poorly introduced is arduous work. Clinicians, nurses, and other providers may be hesitant to embrace new tools — especially those that threaten to interfere with their preferred routines — or they may have had a negative prior experience with an AI system that was too time-consuming or cumbersome.

The Duke team doesn’t want to create another notification that causes a headache for providers — or one that’s easy for them to ignore. Instead, they’re focused on tools that add clear value. The easiest starting point: ask health workers what would be helpful.

“You don’t start by writing code,” said