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Florida Gov. DeSantis explains his handling of coronavirus: ‘We wanted society to function’

“You can’t kneecap your own society and think you’re going to successfully handle a pandemic,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis told Fox News’ “Life, Liberty & Levin” in an interview airing Sunday night.

The Republican DeSantis has been harshly criticized by the mainstream media for his handling of COVID-19. The governor declined to issue a statewide face mask mandate and lifted restrictions on bars and movie theaters in early June. Last month, DeSantis lifted all state capacity restrictions on bars and restaurants.

“What we did, Mark, was really three things,” DeSantis told host Mark Levin. “One is protect those who are the most vulnerable to the disease, which is our elderly population, and focus that protection there rather than trying to suppress society as a whole. Second thing is, we want to make sure that our hospital system had what they needed in terms of PPE, medication, testing, and we were able to do that.

“But then third, and I think this is really important, we wanted society to function. You can’t burn down the village in order to save it … So if you look now, Florida’s open for business. We have everything — like theme parks, all that have been open for months. And we have kids in school in person. Parents have the option to opt for virtual [learning] if they want, but they have the in-person [option], which is very, very important.”

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As of Saturday, Florida (population: 21.5 million) had recorded 15,186 deaths from COVID-19, compared to 32,875 in New York state (population: 19.5 million).

“One of the things we did in the middle of March is we prohibited hospitals from discharging ill patients with coronavirus back into nursing homes because many of them were not equipped to handle that,” DeSantis explained. “And so what we did instead is we established a lot of COVID-only nursing units throughout the state. So if you had someone test positive in a nursing home, but they weren’t ill enough to need hospitalization, they had a safe place to be isolated in.”

DESANTIS: CLOSING SCHOOL IN SPRING MIGHT HAVE BEEN ONE OF NATION’S ‘BIGGEST PUBLIC HEALTH MISTAKES’

According to the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), 3,202 Florida nursing home residents had died of coronavirus as of Sept. 27. It’s unclear how many New York state nursing home residents have died of the illness because the state does not count residents who died in hospitals as part of the total. However, an Associated Press report from August suggested the number could go as high as 11,000.

“One of the problems that we had in terms of some of the restrictions with nursing homes was we stopped the visitation early on,” DeSantis recalled. “We didn’t want the disease to get in. I think most of the people wanted that done. But after months of this, you start to see loneliness and despair creep in … We

Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?’” says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposes Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian

Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care – Press Release

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?'” saysDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposesDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian of his 100-pound canine companion, American pit bull terrier Elvis.

CONTACT:

Caroline Hunter

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+1 7865519491

SOURCE: Dr. Frank Roach

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Senior Official Explains VP’s Health After Mysterious Case At Debate

A flurry of speculation has surrounded the health of Vice President Mike Pence after he appeared to have pink eye at Wednesday’s debate with Sen. Kamala Harris. A senior Trump administration official told Politico that Pence likely suffered from a broken blood vessel, rather than a pink eye infection. 

Pence’s eye problem, as well as a fly that settled on his head, drew attention on social media.

Dr. Daniel Volland, an optometrist based in Seattle, also diagnosed Pence with a broken blood vessel.

“Eye doctor, here! Temporal Subconjunctival Hemorrhage OS is my diagnosis; it’s a broken blood vessel, not infectious,” Volland tweeted. 

Although some debate viewers thought Pence’s eye could be a symptom of COVID-19, the vice president tested negative for the virus prior to the event. Pink eye is a rare symptom of a COVID-19 infection.

“The number of COVID-19 patients that have been reported to have eye symptoms is relatively low. And when you have a population that small, it’s really hard to get a picture of the story because we just don’t have as many data points,” optometrist Alexandra Williamson, OD, recently told the Cleveland Clinic. 

Pence’s health condition is noteworthy, due to President Donald Trump’s positive COVID-19 diagnosis. If Trump were to become incapacitated, Pence would likely have to take over presidential duties per the 25th amendment.

Numerous members of the Trump administration and campaign have been infected with the virus. First lady Melania Trump, campaign manager Bill Stepien, senior adviser for policy Stephen Miller, Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie are just a few high-profile members of Trump’s inner circle to test positive for COVID-19.

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Trump taking Regeneron drug, Remdesivir therapy for coronavirus diagnosis: ex-WH doctor explains

President Trump is taking experimental coronavirus drugs Remdesivir and a Regeneron drug after being diagnosed with COVID-19 this week, his former White House physician told “Fox & Friends Weekend.”

“The two of those in combination should help clear the virus out of his body much sooner than his body could do it on its own,” Dr. Ronny Jackson said Saturday morning.

TRUMP TWEETS FROM HOSPITAL AS DOC CONFIRMS REMDESIVIR TREATMENT: ‘GOING WELL, I THINK!’

The president was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center “out of an abundance of caution” Friday night and is being treated with experimental drugs in response to a compassionate use request.

“The Regeneron product [known as Regeneron-Covid 2 or REGN-COV2] is an antibody product,” Trump’s former doctor explained.

“They found two particular antibodies in the research they did coming up to developing this product. One of them attaches to the spiked protein and prevents the virus from entering into the host cell, the human cell. So what it does basically is it attaches itself to the virus and it disables the virus where it can’t get into the body, into the cells of the body and cause infection, and so that essentially drops the viral count,” he said. “Eventually your body clears those viruses.”

REGENERON IS TRUMP’S COVID-19 TREATMENT: WHAT TO KNOW

The other drug, Remdesivir, he explained, stops viral replication: “So we’re blocking the virus that’s already in his body and we’re preventing the replication of the virus with the Remdesivir,” he said.

Jackson, who helped design and build the presidential wing at Walter Reed, predicts that Trump will spend three to four days there.

“I think they’ll monitor him and check to make sure the fever is not getting worse and that his symptoms are improving. After a couple of days, I think he will be back to the White House,” he said.

Prior to moving to Walter Reed, on Friday afternoon, Dr. Sean P. Conley, the president’s physician, released an update on the president’s condition.

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“Following PCR-confirmation of the president’s diagnosis, as a precautionary measure he received a single 8-gram dose of Regeneron’s polyclonal antibody cocktail,” a memo released Friday afternoon by Dr. Sean P. Conley, the president’s physician stated. “He completed the infusion without incident.”

“In addition to the polyclonal antibodies, the president has been taking zinc, Vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin,” Conley said.

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Coronavirus spikes are ‘driven more by our behaviors,’ doctor explains

Parts of the U.S. are experiencing spikes in coronavirus cases over the last several weeks, and experts fear it will only get worse as flu season begins.

“I’m reluctant to assign any of this to a change in the virus itself,” Dr. Seth Trueger, an emergency medicine physician based out of Chicago, said on Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker (video above). “It almost certainly is driven more by our behaviors and how we’re interacting with each other.”

The most prominent example of new transmission is President Trump, who tested positive for the virus and is now hospitalized as he recovers. The president, who has held public rallies and largely avoids wearing a mask, has been vocal about states reopening as soon as possible to help their struggling economies.

President Donald Trump holds up his facemask during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
President Donald Trump holds up his facemask during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

‘Really troubling’

Several states are seeing a new rise in the number of cases.

“This is really troubling,” Trueger said. “But unfortunately, it’s not really unexpected. What we’re seeing is a combination of a number of things. As weather gets colder, people are going to spend more time inside, and we know that indoors transmission is certainly higher than outdoors or in other places, especially as people spend more time with each other.” 

The Pacific northwest is seeing a surge in cases. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)
The Pacific northwest is seeing a surge in cases. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

Indoor dining has resumed in nearly every state, including New Jersey and New York City, two areas that had the most number of cases early on in the pandemic. In several states, capacity is limited to 25% but even that can spell trouble if safety guidelines aren’t properly followed, including keeping tables six feet apart, mandating masks for all staff and customers not eating, and keeping bar areas shut down. 

“This is hard for all of us,” Trueger added. “We’ve been doing this for months. And it’s really easy to let things slide. It’s really easy for that fatigue to set in, where: ‘Do I really need to wear my mask?’ We’ve been doing this for so long. ‘Is it time to have my kids do play dates? Is it time to go out to bars?’”

A bar manager at The Jackalope talks with agents from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission as they check that bars are maintaining social distancing protocols to help slow the spread of the coronavirus in Austin, Texas, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Nuri Vallbona
A bar manager at The Jackalope talks with agents from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission as they check that bars are maintaining social distancing protocols to help slow the spread of the coronavirus in Austin, Texas, May 22, 2020. REUTERS/Nuri Vallbona

Some states that reopened too quickly had to revert back to their restrictions after seeing a surge in cases. 

“Just because we’re all exhausted from it doesn’t mean that it’s safe to do it,” Trueger said. “A lot of states are starting to do things like barge ahead because they want the economy to rebound. They want people to be doing better. But unfortunately, until we get the virus under control, it’s not going to be safe to open things up.” 

Bars, movie theaters, and