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Jennifer Kocour Named Chief Operating Officer of CCT Research as Company Continues U.S. Expansion

An experienced clinical research leader, Kocour will oversee business operations and strategic growth for the CCT Network of Sites

CCT Research, a company offering an innovative approach to conducting clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of debilitating diseases, announced today that Jennifer Kocour has joined the company as its Chief Operating Officer. Kocour brings a wealth of industry experience, having started her career as a Clinical Research Assistant before advancing to roles as a Site Coordinator, Regional Manager, Clinical Team Lead, and Vice President of Operations.

Kocour’s appointment comes as CCT Research continues to rapidly expand its geographic and therapeutic reach since opening its doors in 2017. “I’m excited to join a company that’s dedicated to industry innovation, exceptional patient care, and the growth and development of our staff as we continue to grow as a company,” said Kocour.

CCT Research currently has 17 sites across Arizona, Nebraska, and Utah. The sites are located in physicians’ offices, medical clinics, and senior living communities; and the company is looking to add partner sites in new markets. By embedding its clinical research infrastructure and staff into these facilities, CCT Research provides convenient and comfortable study locations for qualified patients in a variety of therapeutic areas. Recently, the company was selected to partner with several top pharmaceutical companies to conduct trials for a COVID-19 vaccine.

“Strong leadership is key to supporting these critical study efforts and future medical research,” said CJ Anderson, President of CCT Research. “Jennifer is a proven leader, and her diverse background provides an understanding of each individual’s role in conducting a successful clinical trial. We’re happy to have her as the newest member of our executive leadership team.”

About CCT Research

CCT Research is a company offering an innovative approach to conducting clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of debilitating diseases. CCT’s research sites are located within physicians’ offices, medical clinics, and senior living communities to support research in the fields of Neurology, Family Practice, and Dermatology, with plans to include additional therapy areas in the near future. The company’s unique model simplifies the process for trial participants and provides pharmaceutical sponsors with high quality data. For more information, visit cctresearch.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005945/en/

Contacts

CJ Anderson, President
CCT Research
480-702-3501
[email protected]

Source Article

Lenox Hill Hospital Expansion Battle Resumes After Pandemic Pause

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY — The battle over an ambitious expansion plan by Lenox Hill Hospital is showing signs of coming back to life after going dormant for several months while the hospital responded to the coronavirus pandemic.

In a community meeting last month, Lenox Hill officials revealed changes to the multibillion dollar expansion project, which notably scrapped a controversial, 490-foot-tall residential tower on Park Avenue that would have helped fund the expansion.

The hospital will present a revised plan Tuesday, during a meeting convened by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer between local leaders and hospital representatives.

Starting last year, neighbors rose up in fierce opposition to the project by owner Northwell Health, which was also slated to include a 516-foot hospital tower on Lexington Avenue.

Community Board 8 voted overwhelmingly last October to oppose the plan, and a preservation-oriented group called Committee to Protect Our Lenox Hill Neighborhood sprung up to fight the project, citing its “unacceptable” size and the environmental hazards brought on by a decade-long construction project.

This spring, the committee went on an abrupt hiatus, as the group acknowledged the poor optics of fighting a hospital’s expansion while its workers served on the front lines of a global pandemic.

“We want to explicitly thank Northwell Lenox Hill and all of the other New York City hospitals, especially the doctors, nurses and staff for the incredibly brave and selfless work they are doing to protect us all,” a message on the group’s website reads.

Now, the activity has resumed — on Sept. 15, Brewer’s task force between hospital and community leaders held its first meeting in months, where hospital leaders announced the removal of the apartment tower.

An initial rendering of Lenox Hill Hospital's planned expansion at Lexington Avenue and East 76th Street, presented to Community Board 8 in March 2019. (Northwell Health)
An initial rendering of Lenox Hill Hospital’s planned expansion at Lexington Avenue and East 76th Street, presented to Community Board 8 in March 2019. (Northwell Health)

“We will conclude meetings this month and we look forward to seeing Northwell’s proposal enter the public review process,” Brewer spokesperson Aries Dela Cruz said Monday.

Meanwhile, expansion opponents are pursuing a new angle of attack, rolling out statements from health care advocates questioning the project from an equity perspective.

Mark Hannay, director of the advocacy group Metro New York Health Care for All, suggested that Lenox Hill should focus its resources in the outer boroughs, which have been hard-hit by COVID-19, rather than expanding its presence on the hospital-rich Upper East Side.

“If the COVID-19 pandemic crisis has shown anything, it is that access to hospital care across our city is grossly unequal, and beds are much more needed in Lower Manhattan and the outer boroughs,” Hannay said in a statement. “Our public officials need to urge Northwell to rethink their entire plan for Lenox Hill and their larger role across our city.”

Anthony Feliciano, director of the Commission on the Public’s Health System, another community-based health advocacy group, suggested that the expansion was driven by financial concerns, rather than public health.

“This is about profit, not healthcare equity — and

See inside Ochsner’s Benson Cancer Center expansion | Health care/Hospitals

Six stories of glass walls facing the Mississippi River and an additional 115,000 square feet, roughly the size of two football fields, greet patients at the newly expanded Gayle and Tom Benson Center on Ochsner Health System’s main campus.

The $56 million expansion, which doubles the center’s previous size, allows all of Ochsner’s cancer programs to be housed under one roof, including the Lieselotte Tansey Breast Center, which was moved from across Jefferson Highway. The central location will ease the burden of treatment for cancer patients who need to see multiple specialists such as dieticians, surgeons, psychologists, social workers and nurse navigators.



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Sun shines on the the newly expanded Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center in New Orleans, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. The Cancer Center was doubled in size, 115,000 square feet of added space, after receiving a $20 million gift from Gayle Benson, and her deceased husband, Tom Benson.




“We can address everything a cancer patient needs in this one building,” said Dr. Brian Moore, a head and neck cancer surgeon and director of the Ochsner Cancer Institute. “You don’t have to bounce between physician offices across town. You don’t even have to bounce across campus. All the doctors you need to see are right here.”



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With this in mind, dedicated patient rooms that feel more like small offices than clinical examination rooms have been built to discuss patient care in a more comfortable setting. Modern cushioned benches rather than plastic chairs await patients who need to meet with someone on their care team but don’t need an examination. 



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Infusion chairs are placed along windows with a view at the newly expanded Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center in New Orleans, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. The Cancer Center was doubled in size, 115,000 square feet of added space, after receiving a $20 million gift from Gayle Benson, and her deceased husband, Tom Benson.




While patients receive infusions of cancer-fighting drugs that often have unpleasant side effects, they can look out at passing barges on the river or watch television on personal devices from a cushioned chair tucked into a cubicle-like nook. 

A special treatment space has been added for bone marrow transplant patients, whose immune systems are particularly vulnerable. That infusion area uses a positive pressure air system so that air flows out but not in, keeping out airborne pathogens. 



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A private infusion room looks over the Mississippi River at the newly expanded Gayle and Tom Benson Cancer Center in New Orleans, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. The Cancer Center was doubled in size, 115,000 square feet of added space, after receiving a $20 million gift from Gayle Benson, and her deceased husband, Tom Benson.




The new infusion area also has a private treatment room for cancer patients who also are