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MEDIOLA Examines Triplet Therapy in Ovarian Cancer

At the 2020 European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) virtual congress, researchers presented results for safety and efficacy of olaparib plus durvalumab with or without bevacizumab in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer who don’t have a germline BRCA mutation.

In this exclusive MedPage Today video, study author Yvette Drew, MBBS, PhD, from Northern Center for Cancer Care in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, discusses the updated data.

Following is a transcript of her remarks:

So I had the privilege of presenting updated results from the MEDIOLA phase II trial of two new cohorts, where we’re investigating the safety and efficacy of olaparib plus durvalumab with or without bevacizumab in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer who don’t have a germline BRCA mutation. We previously reported at ESMO [2019] results of the doublet cohort of olaparib and durvalumab in women with germline BRCA mutations. But this was a cohort of triplets of olaparib, durvalumab, and bevacizumab, and then the doublet olaparib and durvalumab in the non-germline BRCA population.

And I think there’s two real key results from the study that have come out. I think the first thing to say, this is a chemotherapy sparing treatment. This is not a maintenance treatment. This is for women with recurrent disease who need a treatment who have progressed on their previous treatment line.

So the key results are the stunning response rates and disease control rates seen with the triplet combination. So we saw disease control rate at 24 weeks in 77% of the study population and median progression free survival, 14.7 months, and response rate to this triplet combination of 87%, which is obviously very high. And these responses were durable with median duration of response 11 months in the whole study population. And in terms of the safety of this triplet regimen, the safety was acceptable. We didn’t learn anything new about the safety that we didn’t know about the single agent. So it had an acceptable safety profile.

I think the second key message from the study was what we learned from the doublet cohort. So this is the same patient population. It was a sequentially recruited cohort, but giving them olaparib and durvalumab. So without the bevacizumab. And response rates here were disappointingly low, response rates 34%, disease control rate 28%. And so it’s clear that the triplet combination in this population is the active regimen. So we’re seeing some additional synergy and benefit with the bevacizumab.

And this is something that we haven’t seen before in other studies. The triplet combination was active regardless of something known as genomic instability status. So that was assessed in all tumors of the patients in this cohort based on foundation medicine profiling, using LOH score and somatic mutation testing of common DDR gene. So we saw responses regardless of the genomic instability status of the patients. So the triplet combination is exciting. It’s already being investigated in the frontline setting in the DUO-O study, but I

UW Medicine Examines The Coronavirus’s Long-Term Effects

SEATTLE, WA — The University of Washington School of Medicine is helping lead a nationwide study, aiming to learn why some COVID-19 patients experience prolonged symptoms.

One of the researchers is Kelli O’Laughlin, a UW Medicine professor and emergency room physician, who says she has seen some former COVID-19 patients later return to the hospital experiencing severe fatigue and shortness of breath.

“We want to understand the long-term effects of COVID-19 and the ongoing impact it has on people’s lives,” O’Laughlin said. “We are still trying to understand which lingering symptoms are to be expected, how long they will remain and what is causing them.”

Nikki Gentile, another UW professor, said the same trend in “long-haulers” has been also noted by primary care doctors.

“We are seeing a lot of previously healthy, active patients presenting to primary care clinics with shortness of breath, fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance, diminished sense of taste or smell, and/or new or worsening anxiety or depression several weeks, or even months post-COVID-19 infection,” Gentile said.

The New York Times recently reported that some estimates indicate 1 in 3 coronavirus survivors suffer prolonged symptoms. The new two-year study hopes to illuminate why that might be happening across various age groups.

The research, funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will allow UW medical experts to keep tabs on participants who contracted the virus and closely follow their recovery path. Recruitment for the study began on Oct. 1 and will analyze thousands of COVID-19 cases across the nation.

Learn more about the INSPIRE research project online.

This article originally appeared on the Seattle Patch

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Dr. Inglesby examines Trump’s coronavirus condition: What we’ve heard is ‘largely encouraging’

President Trump seems to be doing well since his coronavirus diagnosis, Dr. Inglesby of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health told “Fox News Sunday.”

“The news we heard yesterday was largely encouraging,” he said. “The fact that the president is not requiring oxygen, that a number of lab tests were reported to be normal and he was able to deliver that video yesterday.”

But Inglesby said White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows’ announcement that the president required oxygen on Friday was “worrisome” and it would be helpful to know the results of some other tests presumably conducted at Walter Reed Medical Center such as a chest x-ray or CT scan.

PRESIDENT TRUMP COULD RETURN TO WH ‘AS EARLY AS TOMORROW,’ IF CONDITIONS CONTINUE TO IMPROVE, DOCTORS SAY

According to the CDC, about one-third of COVID-19 patients above the age of 65 required hospitalizations leading up to June 2020, and eight out of 10 people in the same age group died.

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Inglesby explained that symptoms can worsen quickly within a 5-10 day period, especially among people in Trump’s age group and with underlying conditions.

“The president is receiving extraordinary care and looks like he’s doing well but it’s certainly a serious disease for people his age,” he said. “It’s very difficult to judge [his recovery] at this time.”

Large public events such as Trump’s rallies should no longer be permitted during the pandemic, Inglesby said, since the virus is easily spread through projected voice and the president and his team neglect to follow masking guidelines.

“When the commission sets rules for preventing transmission during debates, they should be followed,” he said.

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Inglesby suggested that future debates be held virtually due to the “unanticipated, very large risks” surrounding them.

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