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Nurse who has seen ‘hundreds of people suffocating to death’ moved to tears after Trump downplayed coronavirus

Cristina Hops, who works on the frontlines helping patients fighting coronavirus, said she was upset after reading the President’s tweet on Monday, in which he told Americans “don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life.”

“When I read that and I got home, I was just so angry about it that I felt like I needed to say something,” Hops, who is based in Seattle, Washington, told CNN.

So, she made a TikTok video, to share her emotions with the world. “I have seen hundreds of people suffocating to death and for him to say do not be afraid of Covid is astounding, “she says in the video, while tearing up.”How dare he undermine all of the work that we have done as nurses and health care providers?”

Her message resonated — and the video quickly garnered more than 300,000 views on TikTok, as of Thursday evening. It’s been shared across social media platforms, with people lauding the nurse for speaking her mind.

In her experience as a health care worker, Hops said she has seen how a surge in coronavirus cases can drastically impact a community. She was sent to Miami, Florida, over the summer for five weeks to help a hospital with its influx of cases.

“The hospital that I was working at was completely overrun,” she told CNN. “It’s not possible to give everybody the care that they need and deserve when the hospital is that full.”

While Hops doesn’t believe people should live in fear, she said she felt the President’s words were irresponsible and disrespectful given how many people have been personally affected by the virus. More than 7.6 million people — including the President — have contracted coronavirus in the US, and over 212,000 people have died from the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

“People are going to take this (Trump’s words) as everything is okay and it’s not a problem anymore and that’s just not the case,” she said. “It’s just not true.”

Hops said she hopes that those who see her video understand the importance of taking precautions when it comes to the virus.

If the President were to see her video, she said she wants him to realize his experience with the virus does not reflect the experience of every American.

“What’s most important is that we’re taking care of each other and we’re looking out for each other,” she said. “And I don’t feel like his tweet or any of his tweets reflect that.”

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Doctor says he downplayed the severity of Trump’s condition

Dr. Sean Conley said Sunday that the president’s blood oxygen level have improved after it dropped twice recently

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Donald Trump’s blood oxygen level dropped suddenly twice in recent days, but he “has continued to improve” since then, the White House physician said Sunday, adding a new layer of confusion to the president’s fight with COVID-19 even while suggesting he could be discharged from the hospital as early as Monday.

Trump’s doctors, speaking on the steps of the military hospital where he was being treated for a third consecutive day, refused to disclose the specific timing of the president’s dip in oxygen or whether lung scans showed any damage.

Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley acknowledged he was trying to downplay the severity of the president’s condition the day before.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude of the team, that the president, that his course of illness has had. Didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction,” Conley said. “And in doing so, came off like we’re trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true. The fact of the matter is that he’s doing really well.”

Conley said the president had a “high fever” and a blood oxygen level below 94% on Friday and during “another episode” on Saturday. He was evasive when asked whether Trump’s level had dropped below 90%: “We don’t have any recordings here on that.”

The level currently stands at 98%, Trump’s medical team said.

Trump offered his own assessment of his status the night before in a video from his hospital suite, saying he was beginning to feel better and hoped to “be back soon.” And he was back on social media early Sunday morning, sharing a video of flag-waving supporters, most not wearing masks, gathered outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

READ MORE: Concerning signs in Trump’s care despite word he’s doing OK

The changing, and at times contradictory, accounts created a credibility crisis for the White House at a crucial moment, with the president’s health and the nation’s leadership on the line. Moreover, the president’s health represents a national security issue of paramount importance not only to the functions of the U.S. government but also to countries around the world, friendly and otherwise.

Trump’s Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, pulled his attack ads off the air during Trump’s hospitalization, and on Sunday, he dispatched senior aides to deliver a largely friendly message.

“We are sincerely hoping that the president makes a very quick recovery, and we can see him back out on the campaign trail very soon,” Biden adviser Symone Sanders said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

She added: “This is a glaring reminder that the virus is