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Is The Keto Diet Good For PCOS? Benefits Of Low-Carb Diet For PCOS

Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can affect a lot of different areas of your life. Among other things, PCOS can impact your weight, and a lot of questions come up about the best way to manage PCOS weight gain via your diet. One frequently searched query? Whether the keto diet is a good eating method to help manage PCOS weight gain and other symptoms.

Before we get into that, it’s important to go over some PCOS basics. PCOS is a health condition caused by an imbalance of reproductive hormones, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH). This hormone imbalance causes problems in the ovaries, which make an egg that’s released each month as part of your menstrual cycle. When you have PCOS, the egg might not develop the way it should, or it might not be released during ovulation, according to the OWH.

PCOS can cause a range of symptoms, including irregular periods, infertility, excess hair growth, severe acne, and weight gain, per the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). As many as four in five women with PCOS deal with weight issues in conjunction with the condition, ACOG says.

PCOS may be managed with medical interventions like hormonal birth control pills. But lifestyle management, like losing even a little weight, may also help alleviate symptoms, according to ACOG.

And that’s where the keto diet question comes up a lot. Here’s what you need to know about how the keto diet can impact PCOS symptoms.

Is following the keto diet beneficial if you have PCOS?

There’s a lot to dig into here. People with PCOS often deal with insulin resistance, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This means that the body can make insulin, which helps blood sugar enter the body’s cells to provide energy, but can’t use it effectively. Insulin resistance increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance can also lead to patches of thickened, velvety, darkened skin, a condition known as acanthosis nigricans, and this commonly occurs with PCOS, per ACOG.

So, how does the keto diet factor in here? The keto diet is an eating plan that focuses on minimizing your carbs and increasing your fat intake to get your body to use fat as a form of energy. People on the keto diet usually have no more than 50 grams of carbs a day, but some keto fans aim to have no more than 20 grams a day.

As you may (or may not) know, carbs convert into glucose (sugar) in the body, and insulin is needed to take that sugar to your cells for energy. Limiting your carb intake—like you would on the keto diet—can help relieve the insulin resistance that can occur as a result of having PCOS, but likely only for the short term, says Scott Keatley, RD, of Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy. However, building lean body mass (read: muscle) and losing weight will help your body

The Keto Diet Might Be Worth A Shot If You’re Dealing With PCOS Symptoms

From Women’s Health

Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can affect a lot of different areas of your life. Among other things, PCOS can impact your weight, and a lot of questions come up about the best way to manage PCOS weight gain via your diet. One frequently searched query? Whether the keto diet is a good eating method to help manage PCOS weight gain and other symptoms.

Before we get into that, it’s important to go over some PCOS basics. PCOS is a health condition caused by an imbalance of reproductive hormones, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH). This hormone imbalance causes problems in the ovaries, which make an egg that’s released each month as part of your menstrual cycle. When you have PCOS, the egg might not develop the way it should, or it might not be released during ovulation, according to the OWH.

PCOS can cause a range of symptoms, including irregular periods, infertility, excess hair growth, severe acne, and weight gain, per the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). As many as four in five women with PCOS deal with weight issues in conjunction with the condition, ACOG says.

PCOS may be managed with medical interventions like hormonal birth control pills. But lifestyle management, like losing even a little weight, may also help alleviate symptoms, according to ACOG.

And that’s where the keto diet question comes up a lot. Here’s what you need to know about how the keto diet can impact PCOS symptoms.

Is following the keto diet beneficial if you have PCOS?

There’s a lot to dig into here. People with PCOS often deal with insulin resistance, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This means that the body can make insulin, which helps blood sugar enter the body’s cells to provide energy, but can’t use it effectively. Insulin resistance increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance can also lead to patches of thickened, velvety, darkened skin, a condition known as acanthosis nigricans, and this commonly occurs with PCOS, per ACOG.

So, how does the keto diet factor in here? The keto diet is an eating plan that focuses on minimizing your carbs and increasing your fat intake to get your body to use fat as a form of energy. People on the keto diet usually have no more than 50 grams of carbs a day, but some keto fans aim to have no more than 20 grams a day.

As you may (or may not) know, carbs convert into glucose (sugar) in the body, and insulin is needed to take that sugar to your cells for energy. Limiting your carb intake—like you would on the keto diet—can help relieve the insulin resistance that can occur as a result of having PCOS, but likely only for the short term, says Scott Keatley, RD, of Keatley Medical Nutrition Therapy. However, building lean body mass (read: muscle) and losing

Clinical Challenges: Managing Hyperkalemia Through Diet

It’s one of the biggest conundrums nephrologists face – how to prevent or treat chronic hyperkalemia by managing diet in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Hyperkalemia is the medical term that describes potassium levels in a patient’s blood that are higher than normal. Hence, the traditional recommendation for managing these with patients is to keep them off foods high in potassium.

The problem, as pointed out by Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, chief of nephrology, hypertension, and kidney transplantation at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine, is that potassium is critical to the normal functioning of cells, and ensures the proper functioning of nerves and muscles, including the heart. “So potassium is extremely important,” he told MedPage Today, “And it has been shown to lower blood pressure, lower the risk of stroke and heart disease, and increase longevity.”

According to the National Kidney Foundation, a normal amount of potassium in the typical healthy American’s diet is 3,500 to 4,500 mg per day, while a potassium-restricted diet will usually be 2,000 mg per day. Foods that are high in potassium and likely to be targeted for restriction include many fruits and vegetables including such mainstays as bananas, avocados, and oranges.

“Everything that is healthy has potassium in it,” said Kalantar-Zadeh. “It is the quintessential component of fresh fruit and vegetables.”

Heart-healthy diets are therefore loaded with potassium, he continued. “So it is heartbreaking to have to tell a patient, or hear my dietitian tell patients, that they have to eliminate or limit foods like bananas, or avocados, or fruits and nuts – all of those things that are heart healthy.”

So, restricting diet can present patients and caregivers with therapeutic tradeoffs and associated challenges.

For example, a recent article in Kidney Medicine noted that low-potassium diets can adversely affect patients’ acid-base balance and intestinal microbiota, and result in nutritional deficiencies that reduce health-related quality of life.

The authors also wrote that patient adherence to these dietary restrictions can be problematic since it requires individualized dietary regimens and access to skilled dietitians and regular counseling – something that may not be too common in regular clinical practice. Furthermore, the article stated, there are a number of patient-reported barriers to adherence that are associated with diet restriction, including “a lack of appetite, craving salty foods, being too tired to cook, finding the diet bland and tasteless, difficulty tracking nutrient intake, feeling deprived, and lack of motivation to eat the right foods.”

Kalantar-Zadeh emphasized that while kidney disease has a close relationship with hyperkalemia, in many cases a patient’s condition can be managed before he or she develops chronic hyperkalemia. That does entail a close look at diet, but restriction does not have to mean elimination, he said.

In an article in Nutrients that Kalantar-Zadeh co-authored, he and his colleagues emphasized that careful control of the dietary potassium load is an important aspect of the management of chronic kidney disease and heart failure patients with, or at risk of hyperkalemia.

For

‘I Lost Over 100 Lbs. In 1.5 Years By Making These 4 Simple Tweaks To My Diet’

My name is Ashley Kincade (@ashleyloveebugg), and I am 25 years old. I live in Chandler, Arizona, and I am an operations manager. I was tired of having knee pain and no energy, so I worked with my doctor to create a calorie deficit to lose weight and did at-home YouTube workouts and High Fitness classes to lose over 100 pounds.



a woman standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Ashley K. lost over 100 lbs. after her doc helped her calculate a daily calorie intake and cut processed foods. She also did High Fitness and Youtube workouts.


© Ashley Kincade
Ashley K. lost over 100 lbs. after her doc helped her calculate a daily calorie intake and cut processed foods. She also did High Fitness and Youtube workouts.

Before my weight loss journey, I struggled with overeating, food addiction, emotional eating, and yo-yo dieting. I was always too fatigued to workout, and I would end up giving up on working out because I thought it was too hard.

My feet and legs hurt all the time, and I was in my early 20s. I also had a knee injury, and moving around on it at my bodyweight prevented it from fully healing. I knew if I lost weight it would take the pressure off of my legs and my knees. I felt uncomfortable and out of breath even doing simple activities like running errands, like my body was entirely drained of energy.

I went to the doctor and she explained to me that I may develop other health issues. I didn’t want to be unhealthy at only 23.

So, I decided to make a New Year’s resolution in January 2018, and it was the only New Year’s resolution that I actually accomplished.

What made this resolution different from the others is that I shared with everyone that I knew that I was starting a weight loss journey. Telling all of my friends and family is what helped keep me accountable. I just wanted to be able to look in the mirror and feel good about myself again.

I’m allergic to dairy and soy, so I struggled when I first started my weight loss journey because I wasn’t sure what to eat. I would always go for unhealthy foods because it was the quickest and easiest thing that I could just grab and not have to think about.

When I began my health journey, I talked to my doctor about what types of food I should try incorporating into my diet, and she told me to always stay in a calorie deficit. I now try to stay away from as many processed foods as possible, and I also try not to eat a lot of carbs. (I don’t necessarily follow a low-carb diet or anything, but I try to stay away from unnecessary carbs.) It took a lot of trial and error to find what would keep me full and what I could make quickly, since I work retail.

I started by changing what I ate for breakfast every day. Once I got the hang of that, I changed what I ate for lunch, followed by snacks and dinners.

I now been eat a well-rounded