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Trump boasts of Covid-19 immunity at first rally since diagnosis

President Donald Trump boasted about his Covid-19 immunity as he held his first rally since his diagnosis.

Trump staged a vigorous return to the campaign trail Monday night as he walked to the podium in Sanford, Fla., without a mask, throwing campaign merchandise to the crowd. Just hours before he stepped on stage, Trump’s physician announced the president was no longer infectious after testing negative for consecutive days.

To prove his medical team’s point, Trump emphasized his good health to an audience where numerous maskless people could be spotted among the dense crowd: “It does give you a good feeling when you can beat something and now they say you’re immune,” he said at the hourlong rally.

“I feel so powerful,” he said. “I’ll walk into that audience. I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys and the beautiful women.”

As Trump acknowledged the uncertainty surrounding the length of his immunity, he accused unspecified people of “reducing” the immunity period to make the virus seem more severe than it actually is. The uncertainty about the length (and strength) of immunity, however, is caused by the lack of information about the virus, which has been infecting humans for less than a year. Experts have only recently documented cases of people becoming reinfected.

The president also pointed out that medical professionals have a better grasp of the virus now than they did six months ago, and said that life would go back to normal — even as health experts warn that the United States could face 200,000 more deaths by 2021. And as he thanked Americans for staying resilient, the crowd chanted, “We love you.”

“I have such respect for the people of this country the way they’ve handled it,” he said. “It’s been an incredible love-fest together.”

And with his promise for normalcy, Trump emphasized that “the cure cannot be worse than the problem itself” as he praised Florida and Gov. Ron DeSantis, who was in the crowd, for opening up businesses and tourism. However, he failed to note that Florida now has the third-largest number of cases out of all of the U.S. states, with 5,570 new confirmed cases on Sunday.

As he pushed for the opening of the economy, he claimed that Democratic nominee Joe Biden would seek a “draconian unscientific lockdown” that would delay recovery for the state.

“When you’re the president, you can’t lock yourself in a basement and say, ‘I’m not gonna bother with the world,’” Trump said. “And it’s risky, but you’ve got to get out.”

In a speech filled with many of his most familiar applause and attack lines, Trump also boasted about the size of his crowd as he mocked Biden for his smaller gatherings.

Anthony Fauci, however, on Monday expressed his wariness about holding large political rallies during a pandemic.

“Put aside the political implications the rally has,” Fauci said on CNN. “Purely for public health, we know that’s asking for trouble when you

Trump, downplaying risk, says he’s ready to ‘kiss everyone’ at his first campaign trail rally since COVID-19 diagnosis

President Trump in his return to the campaign trail in Florida on Monday evening boasted he has recovered from COVID-19 and is impervious to the disease that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

The president, who tested positive on Oct. 1, also indicated he is unconcerned about being contagious and told the audience gathered at Orlando Sanford International Airport that he would be happy to engage in some close contact. 

“One thing with me, the nice part, I went through it, now they say I’m immune. … I feel so powerful,” Trump said. “I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys, and the beautiful women, and the — everybody. I’ll just give you a big fat kiss.”

Trump spoke for about an hour. While his remarks were short by the standards of his past rallies, which are often about 80 minutes long, it was far longer than any of the brief videos he released while recovering from the virus or his first live speech, which took place at the White House on Saturday and lasted less than 2 minutes. 

The president’s return to the campaign trail came shortly after the White House medical team announced that he tested negative “on consecutive days.” Trump’s return to public events came exactly 10 days after the White House said his symptoms first appeared, which is the period of isolation recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.

Trump, who was treated with steroids and experimental drugs, became ill after his campaign and the White House hosted a series of events that ignored masks and social distancing measures designed to stop the spread of the virus. Over a dozen people linked to those gatherings also tested positive, including senior members of the president’s campaign team and White House staff.

The White House has declined to reveal precisely how many staffers have fallen ill. Trump’s team has also repeatedly refused to say when he last tested negative prior to his diagnosis, raising the possibility that the testing regimen supposedly in place at the White House was not followed and also making it impossible to say whether the president traveled to events while contagious. 

Even after the cluster of cases at the White House, Trump’s Florida rally still didn’t include standard measures designed to minimize risks of coronavirus spread. Guests were packed together and many did not wear masks. 

On stage, Trump, as he has for months, criticized lockdowns and quarantine measures as detrimental to the economy. He encouraged people to ignore them if they choose.

“The cure cannot be worse than the problem itself,” Trump said of the lockdowns.“If you want to stay, stay. Relax. Stay. But, if you want to get out there, get out.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)


© Provided by Yahoo! News
President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)

The president also suggested keeping distance from others was never an option for him.   

Video: President Trump: White House doctors said I can’t spread the virus anymore

Trump boasts of Covid-19 immunity at his first rally since diagnosis


President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the Orlando Sanford International Airport Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, in Sanford, Fla.

President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the Orlando Sanford International Airport Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, in Sanford, Fla. | AP Photo/John Raoux

The president said his immunity made him feel “powerful.”

President Donald Trump boasted about his Covid-19 immunity as he held his first rally since his diagnosis.

Trump staged a vigorous return to the campaign trail as he walked to the podium in Sanford, Fla., without a mask, throwing campaign merchandise to the crowd. Just hours before he stepped on stage, Trump’s physician announced the president was no longer infectious after testing negative for consecutive days.

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To prove his medical team’s point, Trump emphasized his good health to an audience where numerous maskless people could be spotted among the dense crowd: “It does give you a good feeling when you can beat something and now they say you’re immune,” he said.

“I feel so powerful,” he said. “I’ll walk into that audience. I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys and the beautiful women.”

As Trump acknowledged the uncertainty surrounding the length of his immunity, he accused unspecified people of “reducing” the immunity period to make the virus seem more severe than it actually is. The uncertainty about the length of immunity, however, is caused by the lack of information about the virus, which has been infecting humans for less than a year. Experts have only recently documented cases of people becoming reinfected.

The president also pointed out that medical professionals have a better grasp of the virus now than they did six months ago, and said that life would go back to normal — even as health experts warn that the United States could face 200,000 more deaths by 2021. And as he thanked Americans for staying resilient, the crowd chanted, “We love you.”

In a speech filled with many of his most familiar applause and attack lines, Trump also boasted about the size of his crowd as he mocked Biden for his smaller gatherings.

Anthony Fauci, however, on Monday expressed his wariness about holding large political rallies during a pandemic.

“Put aside the political implications the rally has,” Fauci said. “Purely for public health, we know that’s asking for trouble when you do that.”

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The Wanted’s Tom Parker aims to raise awareness following diagnosis

Tom Parker has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour, pictured in May 2013. (Getty Images)
Tom Parker has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour, pictured in May 2013. (Getty Images)

The Wanted’s Tom Parker has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour.

The boy band singer, 32, said he was “still in shock” after being told six weeks ago that he had a type of tumour called a stage 4 glioblastoma

He received the diagnosis shortly before he is due to become a dad for the second time.

“There’s no easy way to say this but I’ve sadly been diagnosed with a Brain Tumour and I’m already undergoing treatment,” he wrote on Instagram, alongside a picture of himself and his wife, Kelsey Hardwick and their 16-month-old daughter, Aurelia.

Parker went on to say he hopes to remain positive, despite being told the cancer diagnosis is terminal.

“We are all absolutely devastated but we are gonna fight this all the way,” his post continues. “We don’t want your sadness, we just want love and positivity and together we will raise awareness of this terrible disease and look for all available treatment options.

“It’s gonna be a tough battle but with everyone’s love and support we are going to beat this.”

Read more: Brain cancer patient, 32, given six weeks to live ‘still fighting’ two years later

In an interview with OK! magazine, Parker revealed he suffered a seizure in July and was put on a waiting list for an MRI scan.

Six weeks later he had another, more serious seizure during a family trip to Norwich and was rushed to hospital.

After three days of tests, he was given the diagnosis that he was suffering from grade four glioblastoma.

What are the symptoms of a brain tumour?

The symptoms of a brain tumour will depend upon which part of the brain is affected, according to Brain Tumour Research.

The most common symptoms are caused by an increase in pressure in the skull caused by the growth of a tumour in the brain.

Other common symptoms, which may initially come and go, can include one or more of the following:

  • Headaches

  • Eye and vision-related problems (such as squinting and double-vision)

  • Continuing nausea, vomiting 

  • Extreme or sudden drowsiness

  • Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) or hearing loss 

  • Unexplained twitches of the face or limbs

  • Seizures (fits or faints)

  • Appearing to be lost in a deep daydream for a short while

  • Confusion

  • Loss of balance

  • Numbness or weakness in the arms or legs, especially if progressive and leading to paralysis

  • Numbness or weakness in a part of the face, so that the muscles drop slightly

  • Numbness or weakness on one side of the body, resulting in stumbling or lack of co-ordination

  • Changes in personality or behaviour

  • Impaired memory or mental ability, which may be very subtle to begin with

  • Changes in senses, including smell

  • Problems with speech, writing or drawing

  • Loss of concentration or difficulty in concentrating

  • Changes in sleep patterns

Read more: Sarah Harding is undergoing treatment for breast cancer

“Depending on which part of the

Why anti-maskers ignore risks even after Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis

  • President Donald Trump, who has long mocked others for wearing masks, was diagnosed with coronavirus. 
  • Following his diagnosis, family members and White House staff that previously flouted mask wearing recommendations since appear to have reconsidered, and are now wearing masks in public. 
  • That may not be enough to persuade some staunch anti-maskers to change their minds, since evidence of the risks is “irrelevant” to their ideological concerns, according to psychologists.
  • But for those who oppose masks as part of a partisan identity, seeing influential people like the Trump family wearing masks may be enough reason to follow suit, as group norms are a powerful motivator.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Wearing a mask is recommended by health officials and experts around the world as one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus. 

Yet in the US, it’s become a contentious issue, in part due to inflammatory statements from politicians like President Donald Trump, who has mocked people for wearing masks. 

But since President Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19, the people around him, including daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner, have been spotted wearing masks in public, after previous high-profile instances of declining to do so. 

Their change of heart may not be enough to convince staunch anti-maskers to do the same, psychologists say.

That’s because masks have become a powerful symbol of ideology and identity, according to Jacob Teeny, an assistant professor of marketing at Northwestern University who has written about the psychology behind opposition to masks. This can lead to top-down processing, wherein people interpret data to fit their pre-existing ideas of how things work. 

“The ambiguity of Trump’s handling of this situation will allow people to shift it to seem however they want,” Teeny told Insider.

Anti-maskers may be unlikely to change if they’re more concerned with ideology than risks or harm

Seeing that there might be negative consequences to an action is a big source of behavioral change, Teeny explained. That means one motivation for wearing a mask may be observing that non-mask-wearers become ill.

In theory, that could be the case with Trump, and his diagnosis might serve as a warning of the serious risk facing those who eschew mask-wearing recommendations. 

But more than seven months into the pandemic, there’s a wealth of evidence that wearing a mask can protect against the deadly viral infection. Even the risk of serious illness or death hasn’t stopped people from opposing masks, according to Andrew Luttrell, professor of social psychology at Ball State University and co-writer of a Psychology Today column with Teeny. 

“The one thing that’s strange about it is that this isn’t the first time we’ve seen a consequence,” Luttrell said.”The folks that have been anti-mask have acknowledged and rejected those consequences, which makes me wonder if this new piece of evidence would change their minds.” 

That may be because anti-maskers aren’t interested in debating the science of masks or viral risk at all, he said. Their arguments are instead

Trump hosts first public event since COVID-19 diagnosis, says virus will ‘disappear’ with ‘science, medicine’

President Trump hosted a gathering with reportedly somewhere between 300 and 400 people in attendance on Saturday on the South Lawn of the White House, marking his first public event since he was hospitalized after contracting COVID-19 last week. It’s been just two weeks since a crowd gathered in the Rose Garden for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination, which experts believe may have been the catalyst for a coronavirus outbreak that affected both the Trump administration and Republican senators.

Trump was scheduled to speak Saturday for about 30 minutes, but wound up only utilizing 18, an unusual instance of efficiency for the president, who is known for going on tangents that go far beyond the scope of his planned marks. His voice reportedly sounded “a touch hoarse,” but he showed no outward signs of illness and said he was “feeling great,” The Associated Press reports.

During his speech, Trump said the coronavirus “is going to disappear” largely thanks “science, medicine,” and “the American spirit.” That’s a familiar line for the president, although this time the optimism appeared based in his belief that newly-developed therapies, rather than wishful thinking, would lead the charge.

The event was not billed as a campaign rally, but the president’s rhetoric suggested otherwise. Read more at Axios.

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Rep. Hayes tests negative for virus, 3 weeks after diagnosis

WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) — U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes said a test Saturday showed no signs of the coronavirus in her body, nearly three weeks after she was diagnosed with COVID-19.

The Democrat, who represents Connecticut’s 5th District, has been documenting her battle against the disease on social media since revealing her positive test results on Sept. 20.

“Tossed and turned most of the night,” she posted on Sept. 21. “Breathing is so labored.”

Hayes said a follow-up COVID-19 test on Saturday came back negative. She said she also received a flu shot and made an appointment with the American Red Cross to donate plasma.


“We can all do our part to keep our community safe,” she tweeted Saturday in a post followed by three mask-wearing emojis and the hashtag “#HealthyATHome.”

In other coronavirus related news:

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RAPID TESTS

Sacred Heart University and the University of Saint Joseph are the latest in Connecticut to use the rapid saliva-based coronavirus test developed at Yale.

The schools hope adding the testing method to tests already being conducted will help them identify cases earlier and prevent large outbreaks on campus. Both schools also are using the nasal swab form of testing.

“Over the last few weeks as we saw upticks of positive cases on other campuses we decided to increase the percentage of students tested each week and we also wanted more rapid results,” University of Saint Joseph President Rhona Free said in a statement. “SalivaDirect was able to complete the new level of testing that we needed with quick results.”

Sacred Heart spokesperson Deb Noack said the 900 saliva tests they plan to due each week will augment the 1,300 nasal swab tests that had already been conducted.

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Trump gives overview of COVID-19 case in first on-camera interview since diagnosis

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Trump chastises Whitmer for calling him ‘complicit’ in extremism associated with kidnapping scheme Trump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis MORE on Friday participated in his first on-camera interview since testing positive for COVID-19, during which he admitted that he remained hospitalized for observation after scans showed some congestion in his lungs and touted the benefits of his early treatment.

The president offered a rosy outlook of his path forward in a pre-recorded interview with Fox News medical contributor Marc Siegel. Trump spoke to Siegel from the Rose Garden, while the doctor was based in a network studio.

Trump insisted that he was feeling well and that he had been “medication free” since earlier in the day. But he acknowledged that he experienced fatigue and could have faced a more dire outcome without the access to medical care he has as president.

“They tested the lungs, they checked for the lungs and they tested with different machinery … and it tested good,” Trump said of his stay at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “Initially I think they had some congestion in there, but ultimately it tested good. And with each day it got better, and I think that’s why they wanted me to stay.”

The president also reported feeling fatigued after contracting the virus. While he did not discuss it on Friday, Trump also required supplemental oxygen, according to his physician, before being taken to the hospital.

The president — who has repeatedly downplayed the severity of the virus and falsely claimed that the disease affects “virtually” no young people — highlighted the importance of early treatment for combating COVID-19.

“The biggest thing is that I did do it early,” Trump said. “Now I have such great access to medical … so it’s a lot easier for me than somebody who doesn’t have access to a doctor so easily.”

“And, you know, I think it would have gotten a lot worse. One of the doctors said he thought it would have gotten a lot worse,” he added. “I just think that even these medications, they’re a lot better if you get them early than if you get them late. I think going in early is a big factor in my case.”

The president tested positive for COVID-19 on Oct. 1. He was taken to the hospital on Oct. 2, and he was discharged Oct. 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance advises that those infected with COVID-19 isolate for at least 10 days from the onset of symptoms, or longer in more serious cases.

Trump has repeatedly touted the benefits of an antibody cocktail he was given upon his diagnosis, calling it a “miracle” and a “cure.” But the treatment from Regeneron is still in the trial phase and is not widely available to the public.

Trump has politicized other treatments for the virus, including hydroxychloroquine, and pushed

Trump Says Coronavirus Diagnosis A ‘Blessing From God’, Shares COVID-19 Treatment He Received

KEY POINTS

  • Trump called his coronavirus diagnosis a ‘blessing from God’
  • The president shared a five-minute clip where he touted his Regeneron treatment regimen
  • He also said he wants to make the treatment available for free to the general public

President Donald Trump on Wednesday uploaded a video on his Twitter account where he called his recent coronavirus diagnosis a ‘blessing from God’ and touted the benefits of an experimental drug treatment he received. 

In the nearly five-minute clip, the president — who spoke from the White House Rose Garden — praised his treatment regiment, including the antibody cocktail made by Regeneron, for helping him “feel great.”

“For me, I walked in, I didn’t feel good. A short 24 hours later I was feeling great. I wanted to get out of the hospital,” Trump said. “And that’s what I want for everybody. I want everybody to be given the same treatment as your president, because I feel great. I feel, like, perfect.”

“I think this was a blessing from God that I caught it. This was a blessing in disguise,” he added.

Trump claimed he told his doctors to give him the Regeneron treatment. The president also said he is now convinced that his treatment regimen should be made available for free to the broader public. It is unclear how he planned to make the cost of the drugs free for thousands of patients, The Hill reported.  

Regeneron, a New York-based biotech company, made the drug REGN-COV2 that is intended to mimic the human body’s immune system and provide it with molecules to fight off the novel coronavirus. 

According to USA Today, REGN-COV2 is currently being tested in people who contracted COVID-19, including those who have been diagnosed with the virus, are symptomatic, but not hospitalized. The drug has yet to receive approval for use in the U.S. or other countries. 

The video is the latest attempt from the White House to project optimism after numerous reports alleged that Trump’s coronavirus condition may be severe after he received the antiviral drug remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone. 

The president covered other talking points in the clip, including his belief that a coronavirus vaccine will soon be ready. He also said he pushed health agencies to speed up their approval processes and claimed China will “pay a big price” for the virus originating there. 

No mask, no worries, says US President Donald Trump No mask, no worries, says US President Donald Trump Photo: AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM

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Trump works from Oval Office six days after COVID-19 diagnosis

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE worked from the Oval Office on Wednesday, less than a week after his coronavirus diagnosis, as his doctor said he was feeling “great” and experiencing no symptoms.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that coronavirus patients self-isolate for at least 10 days after the onset of their symptoms. Trump tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday and spent three days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Facility receiving care over the weekend, returning to the White House on Monday evening. 

A White House spokesman said Trump is being briefed on stimulus talks and Hurricane Delta. A Marine stood outside the entrance to the West Wing, a sign that the president is at work inside.

Trump tweeted Wednesday that he had spoken with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) about the hurricane, and shared local Federal Emergency Management Agency guidance for individuals to prepare for the storm.

“Please heed the directions of your State and Local Officials. We are working with them very closely — please be prepared, be careful, and be safe!” Trump tweeted.

 

In working from the Oval Office, Trump may be increasing the risk that others in the West Wing catch the virus. It was not clear who was briefing Trump on Wednesday afternoon. 

A growing number of individuals working in the White House or connected to Trump’s campaign or who otherwise have recently attended White House events have tested positive for the virus over the past week.  

White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFormer GOP chair Michael Steele calls Trump ‘the superspreader’ in the White House Murkowski after Trump halts talks: Congress must move on virus package Overnight Health Care: Trump calls off coronavirus relief talks MORE said earlier Wednesday that Trump had wanted to work from the Oval Office on Tuesday — one day after he returned from the hospital — and the White House was instituting safety protocols in order to ensure that it is safe. Trump has otherwise been working out of the residence, where he and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpDemocratic Rep. Carbajal tests positive for COVID-19 Biden: ‘We shouldn’t have’ second debate if Trump still has COVID-19 Overnight Defense: Top military officers quarantine after positive COVID case | Distracted pilot,