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Vituity and Decoded Health Launch Virtual Front Door for Hospitals and Health Systems

Vituity, a nationwide, physician-owned-and-led multispecialty partnership, and Decoded Health, a startup focused on building the world’s first clinical hyper-automation platform, today announced the launch of the world’s first clinically trained, artificially intelligent virtual front door solution for hospitals and clinics. Serving as the digital entry point to the healthcare system, Vituity’s Intelligent Virtual Front Door Solution will utilize Decoded Health’s Hyperautomation Platform to scale the entire clinical workflow, from inferring patients’ needs to rationalizing a plan of care.

Through a deep learning network, the platform provides providers with the ability to multiply their capacity and focus on what matters most – treating patients – and patients with the right care from anywhere in the world. The platform goes beyond traditional telehealth platforms by utilizing conversational AI to interview the patient, recommend a care plan to the physician, gain physician approval, and provide the patient with the necessary treatment while integrating simultaneously with common electronic health records.

“We recognized that Decoded Health has deep technical expertise and is laser-focused on creating the best solution for patients and clinicians,” says Rick Newell, MD, Chief Transformation Officer at Vituity. “They have leveraged our four decades of industry-leading insights, our experience of providing care to millions of patients each year across the country, and our collaborative relationships with health systems and payers, and turned them into a solution that creates more efficiencies and also drives revenue. We are excited to launch this latest care innovation to hospitals and health systems nationwide.”

“Healthcare technologies frequently die on the vine because it is difficult to understand the problem across a diverse set of stakeholders, navigate the complexity of the healthcare environment, and then deploy through robust national relationships,” said Mark Hanson, CEO of Decoded Health. “An early critical insight for our team was that healthcare startups need a clinical partner to break through customer discovery and validation. This partnership allowed our team to benefit from the expertise of thousands of Vituity providers with experience and relationships across hundreds of healthcare systems to quickly develop a unique offering and accelerate growth.”

About Vituity

For nearly 50 years, Vituity has been a catalyst for positive change in healthcare. As a physician-led and -owned multispecialty partnership with a nationwide footprint, nearly 5,000 Vituity clinicians working across nine acute care specialties care for more than 6.5 million patients each year.

Vituity’s acute focus and compassionate care are the driving forces that place us at the heart of better care. Our clinicians and practice management leaders develop front-line solutions for healthcare challenges that improve quality and have a direct, positive impact on millions of lives nationwide.

Our services span the entire acute care continuum, integrating emergency medicine, hospital medicine, critical care, anesthesiology, acute psychiatry, neurology, acute care surgery, telehealth, post-acute care, and outpatient medicine. Partnering with hospitals, health systems, clinics, payers, employers, and state and local government, our footprint continues to rapidly expand. Learn more at vituity.com.

About Decoded Health

Decoded Health is developing the world’s first Clinical RPA

Kamala Harris’s and Mike Pence’s Debate Body Language, Decoded by an Expert

In Salt Lake City on Wednesday evening, Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris sat approximately six feet away from each other, behind plexiglass shields, and had a battle of crooked brows, smirks, and head shakes.

There were fewer interruptions — though Pence still managed cut off Harris enough times to get at least one good meme out of the moment — but more rogue flies than last week’s debate between Vice President Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. However, it was those in-between moments that caught our attention.

Body language expert Patti Wood, author of Snap: Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma, spoke with InStyle late Wednesday evening after the debate to discuss those cocked heads, the smug smiles, and what it all means.

The Smirks

Both Senator Harris and Vice President Pence smirked plenty while the other was talking during the debate — but not all smirks are equal.

“It’s fascinating that Kamala uses smiles to respond to Pence when he is giving false information,” Wood says. “Smiling and shaking her head in disbelief are the softest ways for her to respond. For those viewers who were expecting her to look angry, they are seeing her maintain her calm.”

Pence’s smirks, too, communicated a sense of control. “I coach executives who are going to be interviewed by the media and we work on their talking points,” Wood tells InStyle. “I can tell when a candidate has had a media coach school them on a talking point.  Pence was coached on the packing the court statement — I can tell because he not only repeated it, it was one of the rare instances where he increased his volume, and when he said it he smirked with ‘gotcha’ delight.”

Harris’s Smile and Head Tilt

It was a matter of seconds after Harris told Pence, “I’m speaking” — her version of, “Will you please shut up, man?” — before the phrase began trending on Twitter. Moms tweeted that the smile, the head tilt, and the terse tone of voice, was a familiar one.

Wood agrees that the movement was motherly. “When Senator Harris was interrupted again and again, her big smile, tilted head, and firm, low volume voice was that of a mother correcting her toddler,” she says. “She could have gotten angry; we have seen her really angry in congressional hearings. Instead, she was controlled and measured.”

She adds that Harris’s warmth and sincerity play well for her, making her message more memorable in the long run. “Research shows that we love candidates with a broad emotional range,” Wood notes. “We love someone who laughs and smiles big and warmly. We tend to like to know what someone is really feeling, and 4.3 times the message’s impact is sent nonverbally. We remember what people say when