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Virginia governor critical of Trump’s coronavirus response in first appearance since testing positive

About 65 staff members who had close contact with the Northams were told to ­self-isolate for two weeks. Northam said none tested positive, which he called “a testament” to the value of wearing masks.

He noted that masks protected several staff members who could not physically distance from him before he tested positive, including a press secretary, photographer and security detail who traveled in an SUV and airplane with Northam.

He contrasted that with the largely mask-free Rose Garden ceremony last month that Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, has called a superspreader event. Trump, first lady Melania Trump and several others subsequently tested positive for the virus.

“No masks, no social distancing — and look at the number of people that tested positive,” Northam said Tuesday, referring to the White House event. “We talk about science, it doesn’t get any clearer than that . . . I would remind every Virginian: Masks are scientifically proven to reduce the spread of this disease, plain and simple.”

Northam, a former Army doctor and pediatrician, said his and his wife’s symptoms were mild. He warned Virginians not to let down their guard, particularly as cooler fall temperatures and shrinking daylight hours make outdoor socializing less appealing.

The governor said he is unlikely to ease pandemic-related restrictions in the near term. He acknowledged pressure to return to in-person education at public schools but urged continued caution.

“Numbers are going up in a number of states across this country, so we’re not out of the woods,” he said. “We’re nowhere close to being out of the woods.”

The greater Washington region on Tuesday reported 1,763 additional coronavirus cases and 20 deaths. Virginia added 1,235 cases and 11 deaths, Maryland added 482 cases and nine deaths, and the District added 46 cases and no deaths.

Virginia’s daily caseload was above its rolling seven-day average, lifting that number to 1,089 — the state’s highest daily average since Aug. 13.

The seven-day average in Northern Virginia rose Tuesday to 264 cases, a four-month high in the region.

Daily caseloads Tuesday in Maryland and the District were below their rolling seven-day averages. It’s the third consecutive day that both jurisdictions reported new infections at or below their recent average amid an uptick that began earlier this month.

The recent caseload rise across the region has coincided with the outbreak at the White House, although local health officials have said it’s unclear whether there’s a connection.

Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this report.

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Remdesivir study finally published, and an expert in critical care medicine gives us his verdict

Remdesivir study finally published – an expert in critical care medicine gives us his verdict
A patient receiving supplemental oxygen is likely to benefit the most. Credit: 99Art/Shutterstock

The results of the ACTT-1 trial, which looked at the effectiveness of remdesivir as a treatment for COVID-19, have finally been published. So far the only drug that has been shown to reduce deaths from the disease has been dexamethasone, a steroid that suppresses the immune system through its anti-inflammatory effects. Steroids have a secondary effect on the disease—they don’t target the virus itself. Remdesivir, on the other hand, goes straight to the cause of the disease by inhibiting the virus.

The drug, which was developed by Gilead Sciences, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration under an “emergency use authorisation” on May 1. It was recently used to treat President Donald Trump.

Gilead Sciences has claimed that the drug has significant benefits for patients—but robust data has been lacking until now. This makes the long-awaited results of the ACTT-1 trial important. Having read the study, most physicians treating patients with COVID-19 will be asking themselves the same question: “Should I be using remdesivir for my patients?”

Should all COVID-19 patients get remdesivir?

The trial follows a gold-standard design of being double blind, randomized and controlled, and like most trials published in top medical journals, at first glance the outcomes are fairly impressive. They found that patients receiving the drug improved and recovered more quickly, were less likely to progress to severe disease, were discharged from hospital sooner, and had a lower death rate of 11.4% compared with 15.2% in patients receiving “usual” treatment.

Based on these positive findings, it would be tempting to conclude that all patients who have the disease should receive the drug, but since it costs around US$2,340 (£1,795) to treat one patient, and is likely to be in short supply in the UK for the foreseeable future, the question warrants a more considered analysis.

The use of any drug also has potentially negative consequences. Remdesivir has not been around long enough to have a track record for safety, and the reports of side-effects in COVID patients continue to grow.

When we unpick the data and look at analyzes of smaller groups (subgroup analyzes), the only patients for whom benefit was conclusively demonstrated were those who were less severely ill and receiving only supplemental oxygen rather than being on a ventilator. It is worth remembering that ACTT-1 is a relatively small trial and sicker patients may well benefit, but it has yet to be proven. Another interesting subgroup analysis showed that patients receiving dexamethasone showed added benefit with the addition of remdesivir, which is good news.

No magic bullet

So when I go into my hospital this week and am confronted on the wards with patients who are ill with COVID-19, ACTT-1 tells me that, provided I can find remdesivir on the pharmacy shelf, I should be confident to use it in any patients who are receiving oxygen alone, in the hope that they will recover sooner and, more

Trump’s medical team says he is doing ‘very well’; official warns next 48 hours are ‘critical’

President Trump is “doing very well” and has no difficulty breathing, his medical team said Saturday — although a senior administration official warned that the next 48 hours will be “critical.”

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley and other members of the medical team briefed reporters on Trump’s condition. Conley said they were “extremely happy with the progress” Trump is making.

TRUMP TRANSFERRED TO WALTER REED ‘OUT OF AN ABUNDANCE OF CAUTION’ AFTER TESTING POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS 

“This morning, the president is doing very well,” he said.

However, a senior administration official told Fox News that on Friday morning, Trump was showing troubling signs of a possible progression from mild to more severe form of the disease.

The official said that medical professionals moved quickly and decided to transfer the President to Walter Reed out of an abundance of caution over what was seen as a very concerning trajectory of disease progression.

“Twenty-four hours ago, there was real concern about the President’s vitals,” the official said. “For the past 12 hours, there has been zero concern.”

The official added: “Early indications are for an extremely good prognosis – but the next 48 hours will be critical.”

TRUMP TESTS POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS: HERE’S WHO ELSE IS POSITIVE

At the press conference, Dr. Sean Dooley said that cardiac, kidney and liver functions are all normal, that Trump is not on oxygen and is not having any difficulty breathing or walking.

He quoted Trump as saying: “I feel like I could walk out of here today.” Separately, Dr. Brian Garibaldi described Trump as being in “such great spirits.”

The doctors also said Trump had been fever-free for 24 hours, and that symptoms of a nasal cough and fatigue had all “resolved.” However, they did not give a date for when Trump may leave the center.

Conley reiterated that Trump had received an antibody cocktail, as well as zinc, Vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin. He also said Trump was taking a five day course of Remdesivir.

Conley caused some confusion on Saturday when he said they were “72 hours into the diagnosis,” suggesting that Trump was actually diagnosed on Wednesday. However, he later clarified in a memorandum that he meant to say it was “day three” of the diagnosis — since Trump was diagnosed on Thursday.

Separately, he said that Trump had received the antibody cocktail “48 hours ago” when he meant to say “day two.”

“The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s [sic] antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd,” he said.

Trump announced Friday morning that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive. A number of White House and campaign officials have also tested positive – including senior White House adviser Hope Hicks and Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien. On Saturday former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who was on Trump’s prep team for Tuesday’s presidential debate, announced that he had tested positive.

Trump was moved to

Trump tests positive:White House sows confusion about Trump’s condition as source tells reporters next 48 hours will be critical

An attempt by President Donald Trump’s doctor to reassure the public about Trump’s condition following his infection with Covid-19 only created widespread confusion and concerns about transparency on Saturday, as a source familiar with the President’s health told reporters that the next 48 hours will be critical in determining how he fares.



a tall building in a city: A view of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland. - President Donald Trump will spend the coming days in a military hospital just outside Washington to undergo treatment for the coronavirus, but will continue to work, the White House said October 2nd.


© BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
A view of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland. – President Donald Trump will spend the coming days in a military hospital just outside Washington to undergo treatment for the coronavirus, but will continue to work, the White House said October 2nd.

“The President’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We are still not on a clear path to a full recovery,” the source told White House pool reporters after the briefing from his doctors.

Moments earlier on Saturday morning, the President’s physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, had offered an upbeat assessment of the President’s condition stating that he was feeling well, that he had been “fever-free” for 24 hours and that his symptoms — which included an “extremely mild cough,” nasal congestion and fatigue — “are resolving and improving.” Conley was evasive about when and if Trump had received supplemental oxygen, saying, “He is not on oxygen.”



a group of people standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Staff and visitors listen as President Donald J. Trump speaks with Judge Amy Coney Barrett during a ceremony to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House on Saturday, Sept 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)


© Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Staff and visitors listen as President Donald J. Trump speaks with Judge Amy Coney Barrett during a ceremony to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House on Saturday, Sept 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

But a source close to the White House said Trump has received supplemental oxygen since his illness began. Trump “definitely has had oxygen,” the source said, adding that it was on Friday.

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The New York Times first reported the oxygen development. CNN reported on Friday the President was having a hard time breathing.

The rosy briefing from doctors, which contradicts other information emerging about the President’s condition, came the morning after Trump was transported to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a move that plunged the country into a deepening crisis as the circle of current and former aides to the President testing positive rapidly widened.

Conley said during the briefing — which occurred shortly before noon Saturday at Walter Reed — that the President was diagnosed with the coronavirus 72 hours earlier. He later released a statement midday on Saturday saying that he misspoke during the briefing and meant to say it was “Day Three” of Trump’s diagnosis — and that the President was diagnosed Thursday night.

Trump revealed his diagnosis around 1 a.m. ET Friday on Twitter.

Conley offered scant and insufficient details about the President’s vital signs. He acknowledged that the President had a fever at one point, but refused to say what it was. A

After concerning early Covid symptoms, Trump faces critical days ahead, sources say

President Donald Trump is “doing very well” after his first night at Walter Reed Medical Center where he is being treated for the coronavirus, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said Saturday.

But a White House aide, who refused to include their name, told members of the White House press pool that the president’s condition may been more serious than the physicians suggested. The pool is a small group of reporters who travel with the president on behalf of all the news outlets who cover the White House.

“The President’s vitals over last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care,” the aide said in a statement to the press pool that but not directly to NBC News. “We are still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

A source familiar with the President’s condition said some of the same to NBC News on Saturday: “Some the President’s vitals signs Friday morning were early indicators of the potential for progression beyond mild illness.”

The assessment was a stark contrast to Conley’s assessment.

The president has been fever free for 24 hours; is not currently receiving supplemental oxygen and has normal organ function, Conley said, adding he is “cautiously optimistic.”

It was unclear whether the aide or the president’s physician had more update information.

Trump broke an extended silence on Twitter on Saturday, writing to praise medical professionals, adding, “With their help, I am feeling well!”

Conley declined to predict when Trump might discharged. He will be on a five-day course of an experimental drug treatment, the doctors said.

The doctors said Trump had a cough, nasal congestion, and fatigue on Thursday, symptoms that have since begun improving and resolving. They also suggested he received an antibody treatment on Thursday morning.

Trump told his doctors, “I feel like I could walk out of here today,” the doctors said.

The White House also tried to clear up confusion set off from the briefing over when Trump became ill.

Standing outside Walter Reed, the president’s doctors said he was “72 hours into the diagnosis,” even though Trump had only announced his positive coronavirus test late Thursday evening, after attending a fundraiser in New Jersey. Another doctor treating the president, Dr. Brian Garibaldi, said had been treated “48 hours” ago — Thursday morning — with antibodies.

Download the NBC News app for breaking news about the president’s health

But a White House official later disputed the timeline, saying Trump had been diagnosed Thursday night and that the doctors meant Trump was on “day 3” not a full 72 hours in on his diagnosis.

The official also said that the antibody treatment was given later Thursday night, not a full 48 hours ago.

On Saturday afternoon, Conley issued a statement through the White House saying Trump had been diagnosed on Thursday night, and given the antibody treatment on Friday.

“I incorrectly used the term ‘seventy-two hours’ instead of ‘day three’ and

Endpoint Health and Vanderbilt University Medical Center to Create World’s First Precision Medicine Trial Network Focused on Critical Illness

Late-stage interventional trials will evaluate personalized approaches to existing care and novel targeted therapies

Endpoint Health, the first targeted therapeutics company focused on integrated solutions for critical illnesses, today announced a new strategic partnership with Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) to create the first precision medicine clinical trial network focused on late-stage clinical trials in critical illness. The network will combine leading critical illness researchers, trialists and premier medical centers from across the country to create a sustained system for conducting phase II and III interventional trials intended to validate precision medicine technologies, therapies, and deployable patient-centric care approaches. It will prioritize trials investigating promising precision-driven interventions to prevent or treat critical illnesses such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which are the most expensive conditions to treat in the hospital setting and are associated with half of U.S. hospital mortality.

“Endpoint Health envisions a future where clinicians are empowered with an array of targeted therapies and personalized approaches to improve the outcomes of their sickest patients,” said Jason Springs, co-founder and CEO of Endpoint Health. “Our partnership with VUMC will establish a foundational piece of the ecosystem necessary to make this vision real for the critical care community.”

VUMC will serve as the trial network coordinating center with Endpoint Health providing the underlying technology that leverages digital and molecular patient data to predict likely therapeutic response. The goal of the network is to conduct an ongoing series of trials that study multiple precision-driven interventions to treat or prevent critical illness. Endpoint’s technology is already being piloted in a phase II randomized controlled trial at VUMC, which started enrolling patients this month. Endpoint will also sponsor the first precision interventional trial, which will evaluate one of the company’s investigational products.

“Precision medicine in critical care has long been a goal that healthcare has struggled to attain due to the complex and fast-moving nature of critical illnesses,” said Dr. Todd Rice, Director of the Medical Intensive Care Unit at VUMC. “Our partnership with Endpoint Health will help turn that vision into a reality. Together, we are building the infrastructure needed to run efficient and effective precision clinical trials that use advanced technologies to guide patient enrollment and treatment selection that ultimately improve patient outcomes.”

“COVID-19 has put a spotlight on the need for better, more personalized care that addresses critically ill patients in both the ED and ICU,” said Dr. Wesley Self, Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Emergency Medicine at VUMC. “Our ability to validate new treatments in a manner that can be translated into actual clinical practice quickly and effectively is an essential step to bringing life-saving targeted therapies to some of the sickest patients. This is an exciting development for the medical community, and ultimately patients, as it will facilitate significant new research and therapy discovery opportunities.”

About Endpoint Health

Endpoint Health combines therapeutics, companion diagnostics, and artificial intelligence (AI) into an integrated platform designed to improve outcomes of patients with critical