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EU nations set to adopt common travel rules amid pandemic

European Union countries are set to adopt a common traffic light system to coordinate traveling across the 27-nation bloc

BRUSSELS — European Union countries are getting ready to adopt a common traffic light system to coordinate traveling across the 27-nation bloc, but a return to a full freedom of movement in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic remains far from reach.

When the virus struck in March, several EU countries decided to close their borders to non-citizens without talking to their neighbors, creating huge traffic jams and slowing down the delivery of much-needed medical equipment.

The cacophony, which also played havoc with millions of tourists caught off guard by the virus, prompted the EU’s executive arm to push for a more unified approach. The EU commission last month came up with proposals that have been discussed and amended before their scheduled approval by EU nations on Tuesday.

“This new system will make things easier for citizens. I am glad that we found this solution together,” EU Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said.

The key measure is a common map of infections drawn up by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. It will sort European regions into green, orange and red zones according to the severity of coronavirus outbreaks, taking into account new confirmed cases per 100,000 people and the percentage of positive tests.

Under the latest proposal, red zones should be areas where COVID-19 cases are more than 50 per 100,000 people during a 14-day period and the percentage of positive tests reaches at least 4%. Regions with a lower positive rate but where the total number of cases is more than 150 per 100,000 will also be classified red.

In light of the very high level of infections across the continent, it means that most of the bloc should be classified as red or orange.

The harmonization stops short of providing common rules for the EU’s orange and red zones. Travelers from green areas won’t face limits on their journeys, but national EU governments will continue to set their own restrictions such as quarantines or mandatory testing upon arrival for people coming from orange or red zones.

EU countries have yet to come up with a unified length of self-isolation following an exposure to the virus, but they did agree to mutually recognize test results in all

Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?’” says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposes Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian

Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care – Press Release

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?'” saysDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposesDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian of his 100-pound canine companion, American pit bull terrier Elvis.

CONTACT:

Caroline Hunter

Web Presence, LLC

+1 7865519491

SOURCE: Dr. Frank Roach

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TikTok dentist debunks common toothpaste mistake

Dr. Gao Jye Teh is a dentist based in Malaysia who, like many professionals over the course of quarantine, decided to join TikTok to spread dental awareness in easy, 60-second videos.

He only joined the platform in September, but one of Dr. Gao’s videos on toothpaste has gone viral already — clocking in at over 6 million views.

“Are you using the right amount of toothpaste,” Dr. Gao asks in the caption. According to the comments (and this writer’s personal experience), the answer is no.

@doctorgao

Are you using the right amount of toothpaste? #dentist #dental #dentistry #tiktokguru #youngcreators #learnontiktok #edutok #teeth #foryou

♬ Mad at Disney – salem ilese

Dr. Gao explains in the video that the amount of toothpaste shown in commercials — you know, that perfect curly toothpaste swish — is way, way too much. You actually only need a dot the size of a pea.

For young kids, particularly those around the age of 3 years old, you only need a very thin smear.

“Nah if my gums ain’t bleeding and I’m not gagging on all the toothpaste foaming in my mouth it ain’t clean enough,” one person commented.

“You not slick, you tryna make us get cavities so you can make more money with our teeth,” another user added.

Both insights — why are so many of you brushing until your gums bleed? —were common throughout the comments section of the video, but, in reality, Dr. Gao is not that diabolical.

In a previous video, he breaks down why you shouldn’t overdo it on toothpaste.

@doctorgao

Here’s why you shouldn’t use too much toothpaste… ��#dentist #dental #dentistry #tiktokguru #youngcreators #learnontiktok #teeth #edutok #education

♬ original sound – Dr. Gao �� – Dr. Gao ��

“Trust me, it doesn’t make your teeth any cleaner,” he says in the video. “It can cause dental fluorosis … a cosmetic condition that causes a change in appearance of the tooth enamel. It can range from a mild or light discoloration, yellow and brain stains, to obvious pits.”

The tooth enamel is the outermost layer of the tooth. It can be cosmetically treated, but the damage is permanent.

“I’m mad I was lied to in my younger years,” someone said in response.

Enjoy reading this article? Watch this dentist fix a patient’s smile in minutes.

More from In The Know:

Dentist in huge trouble for riding hoverboard while extracting tooth

This dentist-approved flossing device has over 17,000 reviews

Dentists recommend this $9 electric toothbrush on Amazon

This electric toothbrush deep-cleans my teeth and fully sanitizes itself for me

The post TikTok dentist debunks common toothpaste mistake appeared first on In The Know.

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Spine Fractures More Common at Trampoline Parks, Study Shows

Across the United States, an explosive growth in recreational facilities boasting trampolines coincides with alarming growth in trampoline-related injuries in children, including those to the spine, according to new research.



Dr Serena Freiman

Among youths, the risk for trampoline park–related fractures is about three times higher than for home-based trampoline fractures, said study author Serena Freiman, MD, of Washington University in St. Louis, in St. Louis, Missouri.

Recreational sports facilities with trampolines “pose a public health hazard,” Freiman said during a presentation at the virtual American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2020 National Conference.

“There aren’t any set regulations for these parks, so the American Society for Testing and Materials released a set of standards, but only Michigan and Arizona enforced those,” Freiman explained.

“Hopefully, since we’re showing a significant increased risk of injuries, the federal government will enforce regulations throughout the United States,” she told Medscape Medical News.

The first trampoline park in the United States opened in 2004, Freiman said. By 2018, there were more than 800 recreational facilities with trampolines across the country. This rapid growth coincided with a 45% increase in emergency department (ED) visits for trampoline-related injuries, from 61,509 in 2014 to more than 89,000 in 2017.

“There’s been exponential growth since their founding,” she said, “and with that we’ve also seen an exponential growth in injuries, whereas home injuries [from trampolines] remained stable during that time period.”

To assess the rates of trampoline-related injuries, Freiman and colleague analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). They included all patients whose records include a code for trampoline injury and who presented to a hospital ED between 1998 and 2017. They compared home trampoline injuries with those sustained at recreational facilities.

During the study period, more than 1.37 million patients presented to the ED for trampoline-related injuries. Of those, 125,473 occurred at recreational facilities, and 1.22 million occurred at home. Injuries at trampoline parks increased 90-fold between 2004 and 2017 (0.04 per 10,000 ED visits in 2004 to 0.9 per 10,000 in 2017), with 69% of those injuries occurring between 2012 and 2017.

Home-based trampoline injuries dropped during the study period, from 2.8 per 10,000 ED visits in 2014 to 1.6 in 2017.

Patients injured at trampoline facilities tended to present at large hospitals, Freiman noted, likely because of these parks being located in more populated regions.

The type of injury differed between locations. Severe injuries, such as spine fractures, occurred three times as often at trampoline parks than at home (2.7% vs 0.9%; P = .016).

Internal organ injuries occurred more frequently on home-based trampolines (20.1% home-based trampolines vs 2.3% trampoline parks; P < .001), whereas strains and sprains were more common at trampoline parks (32% vs 51%; P < .001).

“Since home trampolines are often off the ground, I would speculate that you’re more likely to hit the edge of the trampoline or fall from it,” she said, “whereas at recreational sports facilities, there are often multiple jumpers, and you’re not falling

The Top 10 Health & Fitness Apps Of 2020 Have One Thing In Common (Mostly)

Health and fitness apps are winning the Covid-19 era, thanks to closed gyms. But a certain kind of health and fitness app is winning mobile, according to a new report from Apptopia.

“Six out of ten of the top Health & Fitness apps are apps that offer video workouts or video-guided exercises,” Apptopia says. “If non-workout apps like Calm, Headspace, and Flo were not included here, the ratio of video to non-video fitness apps would be even greater.”

Indeed.

Listen to this story on the TechFirst podcast:

Without those wellness apps, six of the top seven fitness apps include video components. Which says something about fitness in the Coronavirus era.

The top 10 health and fitness apps in the U.S. by downloads in the first half of 2020, according to Apptopia, are:

  1. Calm: 8.6 million installs
  2. Fitbit: 4.8 million installs
  3. MyFitnessPal: 3.9 million installs
  4. Headspace: 3.8 million installs
  5. Flo: 3.6 million installs
  6. Muscle Booster Workout: 3.4 million installs
  7. BetterMe: 3.2 million installs
  8. Fitness Coach: 2.9 million installs
  9. Samsung Health: 2.8 million installs
  10. Home Workout – No Equipment: 2.7 million installs

Video workout apps got 65% more downloads than non-video-based workout apps, Apptopia says. What’s more, they had almost 40% more daily active users, and generated 15% more revenue.

MORE FROM FORBES7 Key Differences Between Fitbit Sense And Apple Watch

The United States led the world in fitness and health app installs so far in 2020, with 146% more app downloads than India, and almost 300% more than Brazil or Russia. 64% of us are spending more time in fitness apps than we were last year, according to the report.

One caveat about this data: Chinese mobile app installs are typically not well-represented in mobile analytics companies’ data, since Google Play is not available in China, and many Chinese consumers install apps from a wide range of mobile app stores.

When you just look at video fitness apps, Fitbit’s app is a clear winner.

The Fitbit app has the most installs, the highest number of daily active users, and ranks fourth in in-app purchase revenue at $4.4 million, according to Apptopia. Video is a core part of the Fitbit app, which also has a premium version.

Fitbit is about to experience increased competition, however, as Amazon has started a paid subscription health service paired with its Halo Band and Apple has announced Fitness+, which will include personalized workouts and recommendations in nine categories and “world-class trainers.”

It’s always a good time to be fit.

And while now appears to be a particularly bad time to be an in-person gym, it also seems to be a good time to have a next-generation video-based fitness app.

The full report is available here.

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Another study suggests common cold protects some from COVID-19

The common cold can make you miserable, but it might also help protect you against COVID-19, a new study suggests.

The researchers added that people who’ve had COVID-19 may be immune to it for a long time, possibly even the rest of their lives.

The research focused on memory B cells, long-lasting immune cells that detect pathogens, produce antibodies to destroy them, and remember them for the future.

The study authors compared blood samples from 26 people who were recovering from mild to moderate COVID-19 and 21 healthy people whose samples were collected six to 10 years ago, long before they could have been exposed to COVID-19.

They found that B cells that attacked previous cold-causing coronaviruses appeared to also recognize the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

This could mean that anyone who’s ever been infected by a common cold coronavirus — nearly everyone — may have some amount of immunity to COVID-19, according to infectious disease experts at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y.

The researchers also found that COVID-19 triggers memory B cells, which means those immune cells are ready to fight the coronavirus the next time it shows up in the body.

“When we looked at blood samples from people who were recovering from COVID-19, it looked like many of them had a preexisting pool of memory B cells that could recognize [the coronavirus] and rapidly produce antibodies that could attack it,” study author Mark Sangster said in a university news release. He’s a research professor of microbiology and immunology.

Because memory B cells can survive for decades, they could protect COVID-19 survivors from subsequent infections for a long time, but further research is needed to confirm that, according to the authors.

“Now we need to see if having this pool of preexisting memory B cells correlates with milder symptoms and shorter disease course — or if it helps boost the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines,” study co-author David Topham, professor of microbiology and immunology, said in the release.

The study was published in the September/October issue of the journal mBio.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on COVID-19.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Dentist dispels common MYTHS that may be putting you off going fora check-up

  • Dr Safa Al-Naher works at Care Dental Platinum in Hammersmith, West London 
  • Expert has debunked common misconceptions about dentists and treatment
  • Seen increase in problems linked to teeth grinding in patients amid pandemic
  • Includes fractured and broken teeth, jaw pain, muscle pain, and headaches

One of the most common reasons people fear the dentist is from horror stories that have spread through the gripe vine.

Dentist Dr Safa Al-Naher, who works at The Care Dental Practice and Care Dental Platinum in Hammersmith, West London, which specialises in the treatment of nervous patients, has debunked several myths that may be putting you off booking a check-up. 

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Dr Safa, who provides treatments as well as facial aesthetics to those who normally struggle with fear, has explained why going to the dentist shouldn’t be ‘scary’ – adding that the professionals are not ‘money grabbers’ – despite what people may think. 

The expert has also offered her top tips to overcome fears of going to the dentist – including seeing a therapist to help you talk through your phobias or trying Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

Dentist Dr Safa Al-Naher, who works at The Care Dental Practice and Care Dental Platinum in Hammersmith, West London, has debunked common misconceptions about dentists and treatment. Pictured, stock image

1. GOING TO THE DENTIST IS SCARY

This is a completely understandable fear that many people have, and most of the time dental anxiety and phobias are a result of a particularly bad past experience. 

Dentists know this and are highly trained in the psychology of dental phobias, how to spot them, and how to manage them. 

Dentists receive experience in sedation and the management of nervous patients during their university training. 

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No two dental phobias are the same, and they range in severity, triggers and experiences. 

Most people are afraid of pain, but other reasons for being afraid of the dentist include the feeling of loss of control, the fear of being told off and the various sounds and smells inside a dental practice. 

Making an appointment and turning up is often the first step and usually an in-depth discussion takes place about what your problems are, what you would like to achieve and whether they are able to help you or need to refer you to someone who can.  

2. PATIENT CAN’T GET OVER BAD EXPERIENCE THEY HAD AS A CHILD 

This is the most common cause of dental phobias that we treat. As a child you don’t understand strange situations and cannot rationalise that sometimes it is necessary to experience pain for the greater good, so you develop an irrational fear of certain aspects of visiting the dentist. 

There are many ways this can be addressed. The simplest way is by many small visits and discussions about your fears, and slowly becoming more familiar and comfortable with the dental environment and treatment. 

Dr Safa Al-Naher (pictured), is a Dentist and Facial Aesthetics Practitioner and Trainer, and

‘I Think It’s More Common Than We Realize’

Bob Levey/Getty Aly Raisman

Aly Raisman is opening up publicly about her struggles with OCD for the first time.

Speaking with Dax Shepard and Monica Padman on the Armchair Expert podcast Thursday, the two-time Olympian discussed her experience with the disorder.

“When you say you have OCD, I like that — I mean, I’m sorry you have OCD, but I mean it makes me feel like I’m less alone in that because people don’t really talk about it a lot publicly, at least what I see,” the gymnast said after Shepard, 45, mentioned that he also has OCD.

“But I struggle with it, too,” Raisman, 26, said. “And I learned recently — like I always thought OCD was I have to touch this x amount of times or I have to do this x amount of times before I leave the room, but I’ve also learned that OCD is classified with like ruminating thoughts or obsessive thoughts or catastrophic thinking. I have that.”

“I’m really trying to work on that right now because our minds sometimes go to the worst-case scenario,” Raisman continued, adding that it can be difficult for people without OCD to understand that kind of thinking.

RELATED: Aly Raisman Shares Update on Her Recovery After ‘Productive’ Therapy Session: ‘At First I Felt Alone’

“I feel like for people who don’t understand it, they’re like, ‘Just don’t think about it.’ I’m like, ‘It does not work like that!’ ” Raisman shared. “It’s so hard because I’ve been trying to really educate myself on the way that our minds work just so I can help myself, but also just so I can better talk about it and better understand it on a personal level with my family or my friends, but also just on a public level as well.”

The gold medalist said that she finds learning about the mind “fascinating,” because “so much of the time, our minds don’t really realize what’s made up and what’s real.”

“That’s what I struggle with so much, is that fight or flight response where it could be something so small and my body is reacting as if like a tiger is trying to eat me,” added Raisman, who has been candid in the past about attending therapy.

“I think it’s more common than we realize,” Raisman said of OCD, adding that the conversation was “my only time ever talking about it in an interview, so I’m really glad we’re talking about it because I know a lot of my friends struggle with it. I know a lot of people struggle with the ruminating thoughts and the catastrophic thinking.”

RELATED: Aly Raisman Looks Back at an ‘Incredible and Empowering Year’ After Confronting Larry Nassar

“It, in my opinion, relates to like trauma and PTSD,” Raisman said. “Unless you’re getting to the root of the problem of why you are not feeling safe or out of control, you’re going to keep having OCD and it’s going to manifest into other ways