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High Ten Environmental Issues Of The 21st Century

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Stamford To Host Flu Shot Drive-Through Clinic

STAMFORD, CT — The city will host a drive-through clinic this weekend to provide flu shots to residents while they remain in their vehicle.

The drive-through clinic will take place Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Stamford High School parking lot, located behind the building and adjacent to Hillandale Avenue. The entrance to the drive-through clinic will be on Fenway Street.

In an announcement, Mayor David Martin stressed the importance of residents getting a flu shot this year. (To sign up for Stamford breaking news alerts and more, click here.)

“It is especially important residents get a flu shot this year to avoid getting the flu and going to the hospital,” Martin said in a statement. “Flu shots are available at our health clinic, your personal doctor’s office or various pharmacies throughout the city. It only takes a minute and ensures you’ll be protected from the flu this season.”

According to Stamford Hospital’s chair of infectious diseases, Michael Parry, getting a flu shot is especially important this year as the flu and the coronavirus, also referred to as COVID-19, have similar symptoms.

Typical flu symptoms include a fever, body aches, extreme tiredness and a dry cough, which generally differs from the common cold, according to city officials.

“Because influenza and COVID-19 present in very similar ways,” Parry said in a statement, “it is more important than ever to get a flu shot this year to minimize the risk of getting both infections.”

Further information about the drive-through clinic can be found here.

This article originally appeared on the Stamford Patch

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Limiting TV ads for foods high in sugar, salt, fat may reduce child obesity

Limiting TV ads for sugary, salty and high-fat foods and drinks might help reduce childhood obesity, British researchers suggest.

They looked at advertising of these products between 5:30 a.m. and 9 p.m. If all such ads were withdrawn during those hours, the number of obese kids in Britain between the ages of 5 and 17 would drop by 5% and the number of overweight kids would fall 4%, the study found.

That’s equivalent to 40,000 fewer kids in Britain who would be obese and 120,000 fewer who would be overweight, the researchers said.

The findings were published online this week in the journal PLOS Medicine.

Oliver Mytton, an academic clinical lecturer at the Center for Diet and Activity Research at the University of Cambridge, led the study.

“Measures which have the potential to reduce exposure to less-healthy food advertising on television could make a meaningful contribution to reducing childhood obesity,” the authors said in a journal news release.

But they also pointed out that they could not fully account for all factors that would affect the impact of the policy, if implemented.

They added: “Children now consume media from a range of sources, and increasingly from online and on-demand services, so in order to give all children the opportunity to grow up healthy it is important to ensure that this advertising doesn’t just move to the 9-10 pm slot and to online services.”

More information

For more on childhood obesity, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Eli Lilly says other COVID-19 antibody drug trials ongoing after study halted for safety concern

By Carl O’Donnell and Michael Erman



a large building: FILE PHOTO: Eli Lilly logo is shown on one of their offices in San Diego


© Reuters/MIKE BLAKE
FILE PHOTO: Eli Lilly logo is shown on one of their offices in San Diego

(Reuters) – Eli Lilly & Co on Wednesday said other trials of its experimental coronavirus antibody therapy remain on track after a government-run study testing the treatment in hospitalized COVID-19 patients was paused due to safety concerns.

Lilly said on Tuesday that an independent safety monitoring board requested a pause in the trial, called ACTIV-3, due to a potential safety issue.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is collaborating with Lilly on the trial, said the advisory board paused the trial after seeing a “difference in clinical status” between patients on Lilly’s drug on those who received a placebo, without providing further detail.

Lilly on Wednesday said the paused trial is distinct from others it is conducting because it focuses on hospitalized patients who are more severely ill and being treated with other drugs as well, including Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral remdesivir.

The company had already asked U.S. regulators for an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the antibody drug, called bamlanivimab or LY-CoV555, to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 patients, based on interim data from a different study in those less severe illness. It is also testing the drug in nursing homes to see if it can prevent staff and residents from getting infected.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the status of the EUA application.

LY-CoV555 is similar to the experimental dual-antibody therapy from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc that was used to treat U.S. President Donald Trump. That treatment is also awaiting clearance by U.S. regulators.

Trump touted both drugs as being tantamount to cures in a video he posted last week after being released from the hospital.

Lilly said in a statement that these type of treatments may prove to be less beneficial for hospitalized patients than for those with more mild cases of the disease. A Lilly spokeswoman declined to comment further on why the trial was halted.

The paused trial is being conducted in partnership with the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a division of the NIH that is working with several drugmakers on COVID-19 treatments and vaccines.

It was halted at the request of an independent oversight panel, called a Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB). It is not uncommon to pause drug trials to investigate safety concerns, and such actions do not necessarily indicate a serious problem.

“Lilly trusts the judgment of the independent DSMB and supports its decisions to exercise caution in ensuring the safety of the patients participating in this study,” the company said in a statement.

(Reporting by Carl O’Donnell; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Bill Berkrot)

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A Canadian spin studio followed public health guidelines. But 61 people still caught the covid-19.

Now, despite appearing to have complied with public health regulations, at least 61 people linked to the studio have tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

“They had done all sorts of things to remove the potential for spread,” Richardson told reporters. “Unfortunately, gyms are a higher-risk place because of the fact that generally people are taking off their masks, they’re breathing at a higher rate.”

Although Hamilton requires masks to be worn in most public settings, the law includes an exemption for anyone “actively engaged in an athletic or fitness activity.” In keeping with that policy, the studio, SPINCO, allowed riders to remove their masks once clipped into their bikes, and told them to cover up again before dismounting.

In a recent Instagram post, SPINCO’s owners said that they had been “hesitant” to reopen after getting the green light in July, and would not resume classes “until it is safe to do so.” Health officials have said that the studio is temporarily closed and cooperating fully with the investigation.

“We took all the measures public health offered, even added a few, and still the pandemic struck us again!’” the owners wrote. SPINCO has more than a dozen locations across Canada.

As of Tuesday, 44 cases linked to specific classes were detected, Richardson said. An additional 17 instances of “secondary cases” were found among other contacts.

The city will reexamine gym protocols, Richardson added Tuesday, but in the meantime, “what seems to be the case is that you need to wear that mask” even though government guidelines do not strictly require it.

“It’s still a good idea to do it, in terms of keeping others safe,” she said.

People should also avoid “classes where you’ve got that kind of yelling or coaching over music.”

She declined to use the term “superspreader” to describe the event but said it is a “very large outbreak.”

“It is concerning that it is extended beyond the initial cases who were related to the classes but gone into of course their household contacts and other contacts,” she said. “We continue to look at what does it mean, what do we need to understand about exercise classes?”

The outbreak offers further evidence of the dangers of people gathering indoors without masks, as health experts warn that cases could spike further in the coming months as winter weather sets in and outdoor gatherings and exercise classes will be harder to maintain.

In August, South Korea confirmed dozens of cases linked to a single Starbucks in the city of Paju where many customers did not wear masks. The store employees, who wore masks, were not infected. The outbreak prompted Starbucks to limit its indoor seating in the country and encourage masks among patrons.

In other instances, mask usage has been credited with preventing potential outbreaks. In May, after the reopening of a hair salon in Missouri that required masks, two stylists — who had worked with more than 100 clients — tested positive for the virus. But masks were

U.K.’s Film and TV Charity Launches Two-Year Program For Better Mental Health in Film and TV

The U.K.’s Film and TV Charity has launched the Whole Picture Program, a two-year initiative designed to to improve the mental health and wellbeing of the 200,000 people who work behind the scenes in film, TV and cinema.

The Film and TV Charity has now secured £3 million ($3.87 million) in funding from Amazon Prime Video, Banijay U.K., BBC, BBC Studios, Channel 4, IMG, ITV, Sky, Sky Studios, Sony Pictures Entertainment, The Walt Disney Company, ViacomCBS and WarnerMedia to deliver the program that is supported by the BFI and backed by U.K. mental health charity Mind. The charity estimates that mental health problems, including staff turnover, cost the sector at least £300 million ($387 million) in losses each year.

The program will deliver a toolkit for mentally healthy productions; enhanced professional and peer support for freelancers; people skills and training guides; industry actions to improve behavior; and anti-bullying services and resources.

Alex Pumfrey, CEO of the Film and TV Charity said: “It has been a devastating year for many people in our industry, and it’s clear we cannot afford to return to ‘business as usual’. Our 2019 research showed a mental health crisis in the industry, which has only been exacerbated by the terrible effects of the pandemic.”

More than 9,000 people took part in the research last year, sharing their experiences and stories confidentially, which identified a mental health crisis within the industry. The findings revealed issues including self-harm and bullying. Since then, the pandemic has meant increased isolation and anxiety for many, and Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people in the industry have identified the effect systemic racism and discrimination has on mental health.

“The case for improving the mental health of the industry has never been stronger or more urgent,” added Pumfrey. “This program of work is designed to turn the tide on poor mental health by enhancing the available support, changing behavior and improving ways of working; but this will need to be an industry-wide effort to create sustainable change.”

The project has been on hold for six months whilst the charity has dedicated all of its resources to responding to COVID-19, raising £6.4 million ($8.2 million), and supporting thousands of workers with grants and financial and mental wellbeing services.

Emma Mamo, head of workplace wellbeing at Mind, said: “Unfortunately, self-employed people, freelancers and those in the film and TV industry are among those hit hardest by coronavirus. That’s why we’re pleased to be supporting the Whole Picture Program, which will provide much-needed resource and support to the many experiencing poor mental health in the sector.”

Industry leaders are part of the program’s mental health taskforce and they will work collaboratively to adopt and champion the work both within their own organizations and widely across the sector.

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Council Rock North Shuts Down Athletics Amid Rising COVID Cases

NEWTOWN, PA — All athletics and activity programs for Council Rock North High School students are shut down until further notice, Principal Susan C. McCarthy told parents in an email Tuesday afternoon.

The move comes one day after the high school decided to cancel in-person classes for the week after three students reportedly tested positive for COVID-19.

Superintendent Robert Fraser’s decision to close the school went against the advice of Bucks County Health Director David Damsker, who did not recommend closing school.

The health department will only recommend closing a school when there is a clear indication that the district’s health and safety plan isn’t working, Damsker told Patch, and there’s no evidence at this point that transmission is happening within schools.

“School closures are very disruptive and don’t help stop people from getting sick outside of school,” Damsker said. “If people continue to have parties and gather, closing school won’t stop any of that from occurring.”

In a follow-up email sent late Tuesday afternoon, McCarthy said two people “from our Council Rock High School North community” reported testing positive for COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases this week to five.

The district is working with the Bucks County Department of Health to identify close contacts of the individuals who tested positive as part of the contact tracing process, she added.

“As always, please continue to monitor your health and that of your children,” McCarthy said. “If you notice a fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19, please remain home and contact your medical provider. Moreover, if you feel uncomfortable, you may keep your children home, and during this time your children may continue to access the classroom and curriculum through interactive livestream.”

Between Aug. 31 and Oct. 13, there have been 131 cases of COVID-19 throughout the 13 public school districts and private schools in Bucks County, Damsker said, with many of those cases linked to activities outside of school.

Parents or guardians concerned about family members are encouraged to contact their child’s physician or the county health department, she said.

This article originally appeared on the Newtown Patch

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As virus surges anew, Milan hospitals under pressure again

MILAN (AP) — Coronavirus infections are surging anew in the northern Italian region where the pandemic first took hold in Europe, putting pressure again on hospitals and health care workers.

At Milan’s San Paolo hospital, a ward dedicated to coronavirus patients and outfitted with breathing machines reopened this weekend, a sign that the city and the surrounding area is entering a new emergency phase of the pandemic.

For the medical personnel who fought the virus in Italy’s hardest-hit region of Lombardy in the spring, the long-predicted resurgence came too soon.


“On a psychological level, I have to say I still have not recovered,’’ said nurse Cristina Settembrese, referring to last March and April when Lombardy accounted for nearly half of the dead and one-third of the nation’s coronavirus cases.

“In the last five days, I am seeing many people who are hospitalized who need breathing support,” Settembrese said. “I am reliving the nightmare, with the difference that the virus is less lethal.”

Months after Italy eased one of the globe’s toughest lockdowns, the country is now recording well over 5,000 new infections a day — eerily close to the highs of the spring — as the weather cools and a remarkably relaxed summer of travel and socializing fades into memory. Lombardy is again leading the nation in case numbers, an echo of the trauma of March and April when ambulance sirens pierced the silence of stilled cities.

So far, Italy’s death toll remains significantly below the spring heights, hovering recently around 50 per day nationwide, a handful in Lombardy. That compares with over 900 dead nationwide one day in March.

In response to the new surge, Premier Giuseppe Conte’s government twice tightened nationwide restrictions inside a week. Starting Thursday, Italians cannot play casual pickup sports, bars and restaurants face a midnight curfew, and private celebrations in public venues are banned. Masks are mandatory outdoors as of last week.

But there is also growing concern among doctors that Italy squandered the gains it made during its 10-week lockdown and didn’t move quick enough to reimpose restrictions. Concerns persist that the rising stress on hospitals will force scheduled surgeries and screenings to be postponed — creating a parallel health emergency, as happened in the spring.

Italy is not the only European country seeing a resurgence — and, in fact, is faring better than its neighbors this time around. Italy’s cases per 100,000 residents have doubled in the last two weeks to nearly 87 — a rate well below countries like Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Spain and Britain that are seeing between around 300 to around 500 per 100,000. Those countries have also started to impose new restrictions.

This time, Milan is bearing the brunt. With Lombardy recording more than 1,000 cases a day, the regional capital and its surroundings account for as many as half of that total. Bergamo — which was hardest hit last time and has been seared into collective memory by images of army trucks transporting the dead to

Infection Control Problems Persist in Nursing Homes During COVID


The new analysis draws on self-reported data from nursing homes collected by the federal government over four weeks from late August to late September. While some states fared much worse than others, all 50 states and the District of Columbia had one or more nursing homes that reported inadequate PPE supply, staff shortages, staff infections and resident cases. Forty-seven states reported at least one COVID-19 death among residents.

The analysis found that more than 28,000 residents tested positive for COVID-19 during the four-week reporting period, and more than 5,200 residents died, showing that the virus is still raging in nursing homes. More than 84,000 long-term care residents and staff have died since January, and more than 500,000 residents and staff have contracted the disease, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s tally, accounting for roughly 40 percent of the national death toll. Long-term care providers include assisted living, adult day care centers and more, while AARP’s new analysis features just nursing home data.

“This is a nationwide crisis, and no state is doing a good job,” says Bill Sweeney, AARP’s senior vice president of government affairs, adding that the results of AARP’s analysis are “profoundly disappointing.”

“While the pandemic has been unexpected to all of us, basic infection control should have been going on in nursing homes for a long time,” he says. “These are places where people are vulnerable to infection, whether it’s COVID or something else, so for these facilities to still not have basic PPE, even now, with a deadly virus in the air, is outrageous and unacceptable.”

Staff infections nearly match resident infections

For months, providing adequate PPE and developing plans to mitigate staffing shortages have been “core principles” set out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), for COVID-19 infection control in nursing homes, which generally house older adults with underlying conditions who are at increased risk of infection and severe illness from the disease. PPE stops the transfer of infectious droplets through the air, while adequate staffing ratios mean better care and less person-to-person contact.

Yet in 18 states, more than 30 percent of all nursing homes reported PPE shortages, and in 26 states and the District of Columbia, more than 30 percent of nursing homes are experiencing staff shortages. N95 respirators were the most in-demand PPE item across the country, with 11 percent of all nursing homes reporting shortages. And nursing home aides (certified nursing assistants, nurse aides, medication aides and medication technicians) were the most in-demand staff, with 27 percent of all nursing homes reporting shortages.


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How to know if chest pains are serious

Chest pain can stem from many health issues. Some are quite serious, while others may be nothing to worry about.

Sometimes, chest pain indicates a blocked artery and a heart attack. This is an emergency situation, in which the heart is not receiving enough blood and oxygen to function correctly.

However, chest pain can also stem from a health issue affecting the lungs, stomach, or muscles, for example.

It is crucial to receive emergency care for chest pain, especially if it is sudden and severe and accompanied by shortness of breath, dizziness, or both.

Many heart conditions can cause chest pain, including:

Heart attack

A heart attack may be the best-known cause of chest pain, and the pain usually occurs in the center of the chest.

People experience this pain differently — some describe it as uncomfortable, sharp, sudden, and severe, while others report a squeezing sensation. In some people, the pain comes and goes.

It is worth noting that a heart attack does not always cause chest pain. A person may experience other symptoms, with or without chest pain, including:

  • cold sweats
  • lightheadedness
  • nausea
  • pain in other areas, such as the arms, back, jaw, or stomach
  • shortness of breath
  • dizziness
  • sweating

Also, males and females may experience heart attacks differently. Learn about the symptoms common in females here.

Anyone who believes that they may be having a heart attack should receive immediate medical attention.

Aortic dissection

This cause of chest pain is a life threatening condition in which a tear forms in the lining of the aorta, one of the body’s most important arteries.

If the tear is large enough or a doctor cannot treat it in time, it can cause fatal bleeding.

The symptoms are similar to those of a heart attack, and they may also include:

  • leg pain or paralysis
  • paralysis on one side of the body
  • difficulty speaking or seeing

Anyone who may be experiencing this should receive immediate medical care.

Pericarditis

Pericarditis occurs when the sac that surrounds the heart, called the pericardium, becomes inflamed.

This can cause chest pain, especially when a person takes a deep breath.

Aortic stenosis

The aortic valve allows oxygenated blood to flow out of the heart’s left ventricle and into the rest of the body.

Stenosis occurs when this valve becomes stiff, either from age or disease. When this happens, and the heart pumps out less blood, it can cause chest pain.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

This condition causes the heart’s muscle to become overly thick, shrinking the heart’s chambers. As a result, the heart is able to hold less blood and cannot pump as effectively.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can also prevent the heart from keeping a healthy electrical rhythm.

The lungs reside in the chest cavity, and the following health issues affecting the lungs can cause pain in the area:

COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term for emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

People with COPD often have pain in the upper middle chest, as well as lung inflammation,