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Bill Gates on Trump virus treatment: The word ‘cure’ is inappropriate because it won’t work for everyone

Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates said Sunday that the monoclonal antibodies treatment President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE received for his coronavirus infection is not a “cure,” but is the most promising option thus far.

“The word ‘cure’ is inappropriate because it won’t work for everyone,” Gates said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “But of all the therapeutics, this is the most promising.”

Gates added that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has “been working with companies doing antibodies, we reserved factory capacity back in the spring, and now we’re partnered with Eli Lilly, who with Regeneron, has been the fastest to get these antibodies ready.”

“They could reduce the death rate quite a bit … adding this to the tools would be a great thing,” he added.

“They call them therapeutic, but to me it wasn’t therapeutic,” Trump said in a video he tweeted last week, five days after receiving the experimental treatment from the biotech company Regeneron

Trump said that he felt better immediately after taking the drugs.

“I call that a cure,” he said. “It’s a cure.”

Bill Gates on Sunday also warned against politicians opening large venues without social-distancing measures.

“I guess politicians will show what their value system is there,” he said. “Society should be able to have things like schooling that get a priority, vs. certain more entertainment-related things.”

“The only way we’ll get completely back to normal is by having … a vaccine that is super effective and that a lot of the people take,” he said.

Gates went on to express confidence that ” it’s likely that by early next year that several of these vaccines” currently in development “will get that emergency-use authorization.”

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Kamala Harris Doesn’t Trust Trump’s Word on Vaccines. She’s Not Alone

Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris questioned Donald Trump’s word on a potential COVID-19 vaccine in Wednesday’s debate, and polling suggests she is not alone in distrusting the president on this point.



Kamala Harris sitting at a table: Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) participates in the vice presidential debate against U.S. Vice President Mike Pence at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, on October 7, 2020.


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Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) participates in the vice presidential debate against U.S. Vice President Mike Pence at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, on October 7, 2020.

Harris was asked whether she would take a vaccine if one were approved by the Trump administration, during her head-to-head with Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it, absolutely,” she said. “But if Donald Trump tells us we should take it, I’m not taking it.”

Pence criticized Harris’ comments and told her: “The fact that you continue to undermine public confidence in a vaccine, if the vaccine emerges during the Trump administration, I think is unconscionable.”

Watch: Harris Tells Pence ‘Mr. Vice President, I’m Speaking’ When He Interrupts During 2020 Debate

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While the Republican pushed back against Harris’ remarks, polling suggests her view reflects public opinion.

In an Axios/Ipsos survey, conducted among 1,075 U.S. adults from September 24 to 27, people were asked how likely they would be to take a first generation COVID-19 vaccine in a range of scenarios.

In a situation in which their doctor said a vaccine was safe, 62 percent said they were likely to take it. Then asked how they would react if Trump said it was safe, 19 percent said they would be likely to take it.

In an ABC News/Ipsos poll, conducted among 528 adults September 18 to 19, most of those asked said they did not trust Trump to confirm the safety and effectiveness of a potential coronavirus vaccine.

Asked how much confidence they had that he could do so, 53 percent said none at all.

An NBC News/SurveyMonkey poll found that a majority of those asked if they trust what Trump has said about a vaccine for the coronavirus, said they did not.

Of 36,551 respondents, asked online from September 7 to 13, 52 percent said they did not trust what Trump had said.

Meanwhile, separate polling has reported a fall in the proportion of people who have said they would get a COVID-19 vaccine.

Trump has long spoken of his push for a vaccine to

Concerning signs in Trump’s care despite word he’s doing OK

After painting a rosy picture Saturday morning of Trump’s condition, a doctor had to later clarify statements on the timeline of his positive diagnosis

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor on Saturday painted a rosy picture of the president’s health as he remains hospitalized for coronavirus treatment. But that assessment was immediately contradicted by a person familiar with Trump’s condition, who said the president was administered supplemental oxygen on Friday at the White House.

As well, Trump’s chief of staff, Mark Meadows, said the president went through a “very concerning” period Friday and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care.

The briefing by Navy Commander Dr. Sean Conley and other doctors at Walter Reed Medical Center raised more questions than it answered, as the president’s physician left murky the issue of whether the president needed supplemental oxygen and declined to discuss exactly when he fell ill. Conley, in his briefing, also revealed that Trump began exhibiting “clinical indications” of COVID-19 on Thursday afternoon, earlier than known.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

According to the person familiar with Trump’s condition, Trump was administered oxygen at the White House on Friday before he was transported to the military hospital. The person, who was not authorized to speak publicly, spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Conley had said Trump has been fever-free for 24 hours as he updated the nation on the president’s condition from Walter Reed Saturday afternoon. Trump was admitted Friday after testing positive for the coronavirus and has been undergoing treatment.

READ MORE: Trump going to military hospital after COVID-19 diagnosis

While Conley said the president is not currently on oxygen, he refused to say whether the president had ever been on oxygen, despite repeated questioning.

“Thursday no oxygen. None at this moment. And yesterday with the team, while we were all here, he was not on oxygen,” he said. He said that Trump’s symptoms, including a cough and nasal congestion “are now resolving and improving.”

“He’s in exceptionally good spirits,” said another doctor, Sean Dooley.

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The administration has consistently been less than transparent about the president’s health as the virus spread inside the White House. Aides had declined to share basic health information about the president, including a full accounting of his symptoms, what tests he’s undertaken and the results. The first word that a close aide to Trump had been infected came from the media, not the White House.

In a memo released shortly before midnight, Conley did report that Trump had been treated at the hospital with remdesivir, an antiviral medication, after taking another experimental drug at the White