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Sean Hannity Attacks Joe Biden’s Mental Fitness Despite Tucker Carlson Saying Tactic Won’t Work

Sean Hannity has attacked Joe Biden’s mental fitness just two weeks after Tucker Carlson said that this tactic was a “mistake” because the Democratic nominee came across as “precise” at the presidential debate.

Hannity laid into Biden on his Monday night Fox News broadcast for briefly forgetting Sen. Mitt Romney’s name as well as for a recent incident where Biden mistakingly said he was running for senate, not president.

“Maybe somebody on the staff might want to remind the ever forgetful Joe that he is running for president. He’s not running for senator,” Hannity said. “He keeps forgetting, forgets the day of the week, forgets what office he’s running for. He is running for president, not senator. Somebody remind him!”

He went on to say: “He is obviously not capable of leading. He has been hiding the entire campaign, and the corrupt media mob is covering for him.”

However, Hannity may have not gotten the memo, as two weeks ago, Carlson said “it was a mistake to spend so much time focusing on Joe Biden’s mental decline.”

Sean Hannity
Sean Hannity is pictured at Del Frisco’s Grille on April 2, 2018 in New York City. He has said on his show that he believes some parts of the U.S. should end the lockdown in place due to the coronavirus.
Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Carlson said the Trump administration’s attempts to paint Biden as “senile” or suffering from dementia are the wrong tactic and even conceded that the 77-year-old Democrat came across well at the debate.

“As a political matter, the main thing we learned last night is that it was a mistake to spend so much time focusing on Joe Biden’s mental decline,” Carlson said on September 30. “Yes, it’s real. Yes, Joe Biden is fading, we’ve showed you dozens of examples of it for months now.”

“But on stage last night, Biden did not seem senile,” he continued. “If you tuned in expecting him to forget his own name—and honestly, we did expect that—you may have been surprised by how precise some of his answers were. Not all of them, but enough of them. Trump isn’t going to win this race by calling Joe Biden senile.”

Another person who seems to have not gotten the memo either is Donald Trump himself.

This morning, the President took aim at his opponent’s mental stability once again in a tweet lambasting Biden for mistakingly saying he was running for senate.

“Mitt can’t be thrilled about this!” Trump wrote: “Joe also said yesterday he’s running for the U.S. Senate (again) and totally forgot where he was (wrong State!). Joe has never been a nice or kind guy, so

Trump doctor says president ‘has tested negative’ for COVID-19 on consecutive days, won’t reveal when

President Donald Trump tested negative for COVID-19 at some point in the “recent” past, his personal doctor said Monday, though he didn’t specify what that meant.

Dr. Sean Conley, the White House doctor who has continued to offer misleading or incomplete information about Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis, offered the latest confusing update in a memo released shortly before the president was set to hold an evening campaign rally in Florida.

“In response to your inquiry regarding the president’s most recent COVID-19 tests, I can share with you that he has tested NEGATIVE, on consecutive days,” Conley wrote in the memo.

A White House spokesman did not return a request for clarity.

Conley wrote in the memo that Trump’s negative results came back using the so-called “Abbott BinaxNOW antigen card” — a rapid test known to not be as accurate as more sensitive swab tests.

However, Conley said the team of White House physicians also relied on “clinical and laboratory data” in assessing that “the president is not infectious to others.”

Since Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Oct. 1, Conley and White House officials have refused to say when he took his last negative test.

The obfuscation has raised concern that Trump could still be contagious.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says COVID-19 patients who experience severe symptoms — which Trump did — can be contagious for “up to 20 days.”

Nonetheless, Trump was not wearing a face mask as he boarded Air Force One on Monday afternoon for a rally in Sanford, Florida — his first public campaign event since being diagnosed with the virus that’s killed more than 215,000 Americans.

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Bill Gates says Trump’s coronavirus treatment won’t work for everyone, shouldn’t be called ‘cure’

Microsoft co-founder and billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates said Sunday that the Regeneron antibody cocktail administered to President Trump to treat a case of COVID-19 shouldn’t be referred to as a “cure.”

“The word ‘cure’ is inappropriate because it doesn’t work for everyone,” Gates told NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “But yes, of all the therapeutics, this is the most promising.”

Although an effective vaccine is an ultimate goal for putting an end to the pandemic, Gates noted that monoclonal antibodies allow for treatment that doesn’t require admission to a high percentage of the population.

“With the monoclonal antibodies, it’s only once somebody tests positive, show symptoms and they’re old enough they’re at risk,” Gates said. “That’s the target for this therapeutic.”

He added that if the monoclonal antibody treatments can be approved for an emergency use authorization in a timely manner, they will “save more lives than the vaccine will,” particularly if given in low doses.

“The president got eight grams and we’re trialing things that are down at more like 0.7 grams, and 0.3 grams,” Gates said. “Of course, that changes the cost and capacity a lot but that’s also unproven at this point, but it’s important that we explore.”

REGENERON CEO SAYS PRESIDENT TRUMP’S ANTIBODY COCKTAIL TREATMENT IS ‘CASE REPORT’

Gates is optimistic that antibody treatments, including those developed by Regeneron and Eli Lilly, could potentially earn an emergency use authorization within the next few months, but warned against the president’s recent push for the regulators to accelerate the approval timeline. 

“You don’t want politicians saying something should be approved because it’s wrong to think of political pressure as needing to be appropriate in these cases,” he said.

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LLY ELI LILLY & COMPANY 156.88 +3.38 +2.20%

As for vaccines, Gates said the majority of vaccines will likely get emergency use authorizations by early next year, with Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine potentially being an exception with a possible authorization by the end of this year.

“The phase three data is the key thing, particularly for the safety, making sure we’re not seeing side effects. So the tool is ramping up and, over the course of the first half of the year, those volumes will get to the point where we really will be asking Americans to, you know, step forward,” Gates said. “The effectiveness could range, you know, could be as low as 50% or as high as 80 [percent] or 90% and, different of the vaccines, some will fail completely and others will hit a very high bar. But we don’t know yet.”

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He added that almost all of the vaccines will

Trump says he’s ‘immune’ to COVID. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from COVID-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, COVID-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in August that a Hong Kong man had been infected with the virus for a second time, suggesting that immunity may be short-lasting for at least some patients.

Trump spoke hours after his physician said in a letter Saturday that Trump is no longer considered a transmission risk and can now be around others safely.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo. “Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule.”

Conley added that Trump has “decreasing viral loads,” meaning a lessening of how much virus is present in any sample taken from a patient.

But Conley, who had earlier this month admitted he was providing a rosier outlook on the president’s condition to convey an “upbeat” picture, did not say whether Trump has recently tested negative for the virus, nor did he indicate when Trump’s last negative test was.

Trump, his staff and medical team have repeatedly refused to provide specifics about his testing regime. Pressed by reporters last week, Conley said, “I don’t want to go backwards.”

Saturday’s letter also did not address Trump’s treatment protocol.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that those stricken with the virus isolate themselves for at least 10 days following the onset of symptoms — with those suffering from more severe cases needing to isolate for up to 20 days. Trump first reported symptoms 10 days ago.

The president’s treatment included a strong steroid, dexamethasone, as well as an antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron. He required supplemental oxygen on two occasions after experiencing symptoms, according to his medical team.

Trump is set to return to the campaign trail Monday for a Florida rally before visiting Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week. On Saturday, the president held his first public event at the White House since his diagnosis.

“It is disappearing,” Trump said of the coronavirus as cases

Trump declares himself ‘immune’ to Covid-19. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative.

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from Covid-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, Covid-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in August that a Hong Kong man had been infected with the virus for a second time, suggesting that immunity may be short-lasting for at least some patients.

Trump spoke hours after his physician said in a letter Saturday that Trump is no longer considered a transmission risk and can now be around others safely.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo. “Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule.”

Conley added that Trump has “decreasing viral loads,” meaning a lessening of how much virus is present in any sample taken from a patient.

But Conley, who had earlier this month admitted he was providing a rosier outlook on the president’s condition to convey an “upbeat” picture, did not say whether Trump has recently tested negative for the virus, nor did he indicate when Trump’s last negative test was.

Trump, his staff and medical team have repeatedly refused to provide specifics about his testing regime. Pressed by reporters last week, Conley said, “I don’t want to go backwards.”

Saturday’s letter also did not address Trump’s treatment protocol.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that those stricken with the virus isolate themselves for at least 10 days following the onset of symptoms — with those suffering from more severe cases needing to isolate for up to 20 days. Trump first reported symptoms 10 days ago.

The president’s treatment included a strong steroid, dexamethasone, as well as an antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron. He required supplemental oxygen on two occasions after experiencing symptoms, according to his medical team.

Trump is set to return to the campaign trail Monday for a Florida rally before visiting Pennsylvania and Iowa later in the week. On Saturday, the president held his first public event at the White House since his diagnosis.

“It is disappearing,” Trump said of the coronavirus as cases

Bill Gates on Trump virus treatment: The word ‘cure’ is inappropriate because it won’t work for everyone

Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates said Sunday that the monoclonal antibodies treatment President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE received for his coronavirus infection is not a “cure,” but is the most promising option thus far.

“The word ‘cure’ is inappropriate because it won’t work for everyone,” Gates said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “But of all the therapeutics, this is the most promising.”

Gates added that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has “been working with companies doing antibodies, we reserved factory capacity back in the spring, and now we’re partnered with Eli Lilly, who with Regeneron, has been the fastest to get these antibodies ready.”

“They could reduce the death rate quite a bit … adding this to the tools would be a great thing,” he added.

“They call them therapeutic, but to me it wasn’t therapeutic,” Trump said in a video he tweeted last week, five days after receiving the experimental treatment from the biotech company Regeneron

Trump said that he felt better immediately after taking the drugs.

“I call that a cure,” he said. “It’s a cure.”

Bill Gates on Sunday also warned against politicians opening large venues without social-distancing measures.

“I guess politicians will show what their value system is there,” he said. “Society should be able to have things like schooling that get a priority, vs. certain more entertainment-related things.”

“The only way we’ll get completely back to normal is by having … a vaccine that is super effective and that a lot of the people take,” he said.

Gates went on to express confidence that ” it’s likely that by early next year that several of these vaccines” currently in development “will get that emergency-use authorization.”

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Florida won’t report Saturday’s COVID-19 numbers, deaths

For the first time in seven months, Florida officials on Saturday did not release the number of confirmed cases or deaths from COVID-19.

Officials blame an influx of test results Florida received from a private laboratory that is not affiliated with the state, according to a statement from Fred Piccolo, a spokesman for Gov. Ron DeSantis.

The state’s daily update had been released consistently since the onset of the pandemic in Florida. It included case numbers, death totals and hospitalizations for all 67 counties. The daily report will begin again on Sunday, according to Piccolo, and will also include data that was originally supposed to be released Saturday.

Related: Florida adds 2,908 coronavirus cases, 118 deaths Friday

Piccolo said that Florida’s Department of Health needs to “de-duplicate” around 400,000 previously-reported COVID-19 test results from Helix Laboratory. The “massive” amount of data from the laboratory prevented Florida’s automatic reporting system from processing data that would be used to produce Saturday’s daily report, he said.

“State epidemiologists are currently working to reconcile the data, which will take a day to finish,” Piccolo said in a statement. “Therefore, the daily report will resume tomorrow.”

The issue is not related to informing people about their test results, Piccolo said, which is handled by the labs or organizations that conduct the tests.

The announcement from Piccolo came more than five hours after the usual time that the state releases its daily report. The Florida Department of Health did not return calls and emails from the Tampa Bay Times asking about Saturday’s data. The department’s social media did not acknowledge Saturday’s delay.

Instead of the latest numbers, Floridians who checked the Department of Health’s dashboard on Saturday saw the state’s numbers from Friday: 728,921 total cases and 15,372 deaths. The weekly death average was about 92 people announced dead per day.

There were 2,908 new cases of the coronavirus and 118 deaths reported Friday. The state had about 2,100 people who were hospitalized at that time, too, according to the Agency for Health Care Administration. Around 460 of those were in Tampa Bay.

The number of coronavirus cases per day continues to rise in school’s throughout Tampa Bay, with 113 new cases this past week in Hillsborough County K-12 schools alone. There was a similar trend for local universities, too, with the University of South Florida reporting 25 new cases across its campuses this week and 121 new cases for the University of Tampa.

The Tampa Bay region saw 593 coronavirus cases and 16 deaths Friday. Six of the dead were from Hillsborough, four from Pinellas and Citrus and Polk counties each had three deaths.

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HOW CORONAVIRUS IS SPREADING IN FLORIDA: Find the latest numbers for your county, city or zip code.

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Hours after Trump’s dark and divisive White House speech, his doctor still won’t say if he’s tested negative

Seven hours after a defiant President Donald Trump resumed public events Saturday with a divisive speech from a White House balcony in front of hundreds of guests, his doctor released a memo clearing him to return to an active schedule.



President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Alex Brandon/AP
President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room Balcony of the White House to a crowd of supporters, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump’s Saturday event, which featured little social distancing, came just two weeks after a large White House gathering that has since been called “a superpreader event” and potentially put lives at risk once again, just nine days after the President revealed his own Covid-19 diagnosis.

The latest memo from Trump’s physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, said that the President has met US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for “the safe discontinuation of isolation.” But it does not say Trump has received a negative coronavirus test since first testing positive for the virus, although that is not a criteria for clearing isolation, according to the CDC.



a group of people that are standing in the grass: Judge Amy Coney Barrett walks to the microphone after President Donald Trump, right, announced Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Alex Brandon/AP
Judge Amy Coney Barrett walks to the microphone after President Donald Trump, right, announced Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” the memo from Conley reads in part.

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That’s welcome news for Trump, who’s been itching to return to the campaign trail and has already planned three rallies for next week.

But the memo’s opacity, the inability for reporters to question the doctor and the fact that the White House still will not say when Trump last tested negative before his positive diagnosis only adds to the confusion over his case, which Trump has been eager to distract from.

After being sidelined from the campaign trail for more than a week, Trump leaned into his law-and-order message in a speech threaded with falsehoods on Saturday that was clearly a campaign rally disguised as a White House event.

Trump claimed that if the left gains power, they’ll launch a crusade against law enforcement. Echoing his highly inaccurate campaign ads that suggest that Democratic nominee Joe Biden would defund 911 operations and have a “therapist” answer calls about crime, Trump falsely claimed that the left is focused on taking away firearms, funds and authority from police.

With just three weeks to go until an election in which he’s trailing badly in the polls, and millions of voters already voting, Trump is deploying familiar scare tactics.

Biden has not made any proposals that would affect the ability to answer 911 calls. As CNN’s Facts First has noted many times, Biden has repeatedly and explicitly opposed the idea of “defunding the

The Latest: Judge Won’t Block NY Plan to Limit Gatherings | World News

ALBANY, N.Y. — A federal judge has refused to block New York’s plan to temporarily limit the size of religious gatherings in COVID-19 hot spots.

U.S. District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto issued the ruling Friday after an emergency hearing in a lawsuit brought by rabbis and synagogues who said the restrictions were unconstitutional.

They had sought to have enforcement delayed until at least after Jewish holy days this weekend. The rules limit indoor prayer services in certain areas to no more than 10 people.

The judge said the state had an interest in protecting public safety.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— President Trump credits antibody drug for quick recovery

— Spain declares state of emergency in Madrid to contain surge

— As virus fills French ICUs anew, doctors ask what went wrong

— British government will announce more support for businesses to retain staff in the coming months if they are forced to close because of lockdown restrictions.

— President Donald Trump says he wants to try to hold a campaign rally in Florida on Saturday, despite his recent COVID-19 diagnosis.

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

RENO, Nev. — A recent spike in COVID-19 cases at the University of Nevada, Reno is prompting the school to suspend all in-class instruction effective Nov. 30.

UNR officials also are telling most students not to return to residence halls after Thanksgiving.

School officials said Friday they plan for students to return to dormitories for the spring semester and resume a combination of remote and in-class instruction Jan. 25. But during the period in between, all classes will be conducted remotely.

Only students facing extenuating circumstance will be allowed to live in campus housing. In recent weeks, one-out-of-nine of the county’s new cases have been tied to UNR.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Health officials in Alaska’s largest city on Friday recommended up to 300 people associated with a youth hockey tournament quarantine or isolate after “a cluster” of COVID-19 cases were identified.

The Anchorage Health Department said players, coaches and fans from parts of south-central Alaska and Juneau attended the tournament, which was held Oct. 2-4.

The department said it encouraged everyone who attended who does not have symptoms to quarantine for 14 days, except to get tested, and encouraged those with symptoms to isolate for 10 days, except to get tested.

Dr. Janet Johnston, the department’s epidemiologist, said that means the department is recommending up to 300 isolate or quarantine.

Heather Harris, the department’s director, could not provide “concrete” numbers of positive cases associated with the tournament. She said the tournament organizers said they tried to enforce masking guidelines and kept a contact log of participants.

Contact trace investigations indicated “significant close contact in indoor spaces, including locker rooms, with inconsistent use of face coverings,” the city health department said in a release.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Gov. Jim Justice announced Friday that bars around West Virginia University in Morgantown can

Supreme Court Won’t Immediately Revive Abortion-Pill Restriction

The first drug, mifepristone, blocks the effects of progesterone, a hormone without which the lining of the uterus begins to break down. A second drug, misoprostol, taken 24 to 48 hours later, induces contractions of the uterus that expel its contents.

The contested measure requires women to appear in person to pick up the mifepristone and to sign a form, even when they had already consulted with their doctors remotely. The women can then take the drug when and where they choose. There is no requirement that women pick up misoprostol in person, and it is available at retail and mail-order pharmacies.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups, all represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, sued to suspend the requirement that women make a trip to obtain the first drug in light of the pandemic. There was no good reason, the groups said, to require a visit when the drug could be delivered or mailed.

Judge Theodore D. Chuang, of the Federal District Court in Maryland, blocked the measure, saying that requiring pregnant women, many of them poor, to travel to obtain the drug imposed needless risk and delay, particularly given that the pandemic had forced many clinics to reduce their hours.

He imposed a nationwide injunction, reasoning that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has more than 60,000 members practicing in all 50 states and that its membership includes some 90 percent of the nation’s obstetricians and gynecologists.

A unanimous three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, in Richmond, Va., refused to stay Judge Chuang’s injunction while an appeal moved forward. The Trump administration, which often seeks Supreme Court intervention on an emergency basis when it loses in the lower courts, asked the justices to stay the injunction.

The acting solicitor general, Jeffrey B. Wall, argued that the regulation was sensible, as it gave women an opportunity to consult with their doctors and ensured that they would receive the drug without delay. He added that the regulation did not impose the sort of substantial obstacle to access to abortion barred by the court’s precedents because it was still possible to obtain surgical abortions.

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