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Bradley Walsh in tears on ‘This Morning’ over care home visit rules

Watch: Bradley Walsh tears up over mother not being able to visit her son at care home

Bradley Walsh was overcome with emotion on Thursday’s This Morning as he discussed “upsetting” care home visitation rules.

The case in particular that reduced The Chase presenter to tears was that of Ruth who revealed in a video on the daytime show that she had not been able to visit her son Sam, who is in the later stages of Huntington’s disease, for six months.

Along with MP Liz Kendall, Walsh is backing calls for the government to change their stance on care home visit rules as many still remain closed to visitors. Ruth had reached out to Walsh on Instagram to share her story, prompting him to get on board with campaigning.

Read more: Tamara Ecclestone shares first look a new baby

He shared: “In Ruth’s case specifically, six or seven months of having daily contact [with Sam] and all of a sudden none, zero… and he’s in the later stages of Huntington’s disease and it’s so sad.”

Walsh apologised for becoming choked up as he said: “It’s hard enough to see your…sorry, parents go, but if your child is going to go before you, you know, something needs to be done.

“I apologise, it’s so upsetting and I had no idea this was going on. It needs to be government lead, there needs to be a blanket decision made.

“The expense would be enormous but if you’re going to live out your last days on your own, locked in isolation, without your loved ones… soon enough you’re going to go, but the people you leave behind are, as Liz said, going to be scarred for life. That is just tragic, tragic… it really is.”

Bradley Walsh became emotional on 'This Morning'. (ITV)
Bradley Walsh became emotional on ‘This Morning’. (ITV)

Care homes in England were permitted to reopen for family visits in July, however, they can only take place if deemed safe by local authorities and public health teams.

Read more: Ant and Dec share video of them getting tested for COVID

Kendall called for more testing in spaces such as local hospitals and universities, stating it’s “what the government should be focusing on”.

Presenter Phillip Schofield explained a government representative had declined to appear on the show but a statement from the Department of Health and Social Care read: “We know limiting visits to care homes has been very difficult for many families and residence, our first priority remains the prevention of infection in care homes to protect staff and residence, which is why more than 120,000 tests are being sent out every day solely for the care sector.”

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Melania Trump didn’t visit husband to avoid exposing Secret Service and medical staff to COVID-19

Doctors and infectious disease experts were highly critical of President Trump’s decision to get driven in a hermetically sealed SUV around Walter Reed Medical Center to wave to supporters while he is contagious with COVID-19, endangering his Secret Service detail, photographed wearing the wrong type of personal protective equipment. The Secret Service has noticed.

Somebody at the White House had considered the safety of Secret Service agents. On Saturday, a White House official told NBC News’ Peter Alexander that first lady Melania Trump would not leave her isolation in the White House residence to visit her husband because “she has COVID” and “that would expose the agents who would drive her there and the medical staff who would walk her up to him.”

The White House defended what spokesman Judd Deere called Trump’s “short, last-minute motorcade ride to wave to his supporters outside.” Deere told Axios‘ Alayna Treene, the White House pool reporter on duty, that “appropriate precautions were taken in the execution of this movement to protect the president and all those supporting it, including PPE. The movement was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.” Deere did not, Treene note, “answer additional questions, such as whether the drive-by happened at the president’s request.”

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Trump Makes a ‘Little Surprise Visit’ Outside Walter Reed on Day 3 of His Coronavirus Hospitalization

ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump temporarily left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to wave at his supporters on Sunday, which was day 3 of his coronavirus hospitalization.

Possibly concerned about optics and taking publicity matters into his own hands, Trump, who was wearing a black face mask, was driven by his presidential motorcade in front of the D.C. hospital. Waving his bare hand from one of the black SUVs, Trump, 74, greeted the crowds of people who were waving “Make America Great Again” flags and posters.

Minutes prior to Sunday’s unannounced car ride, Trump tweeted another video from the hospital. “We’re getting great reports from the doctors. This is an incredible hospital, Walter Reed. The work they do is absolutely amazing. I want to thank them all, the nurses, doctors. I’ve also got to meet some of the soldiers and what a group,” he began.

“I also think we’re going to pay a little surprise to some of the great patriots we have out on the street and they’ve been out there for a long time. They have Trump flags and they love our country, so I’m not telling anybody but you, but I’m about to make a little surprise visit,” he said.

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Speaking about his coronavirus diagnosis, which he publicly revealed early Friday morning, the president, who was given three drugs — dexamethasone, Regeneron’s antibody treatment and remdesivir — during his stay so far, said: “It’s been a very interesting journey.”

“I learned a lot about COVID. I learned it by really going to school, this is the real school. This isn’t the let’s-read-the-book-school. And I get it,” Trump said. “I understand it. It’s a very interesting thing, I’ll be letting you know about it.”

After his short drive, Trump returned to his presidential suite. “President Trump took a short, last-minute motorcade ride to wave to his supporters outside and has now returned to the Presidential Suite inside Walter Reed,” said Judd Deere, the president’s deputy assistant.

After Trump’s drive-by greeting, Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters that the president’s “first positive test” was after attending a fundraiser at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, on Thursday.

RELATED: Trump’s Doctor Admits to Omitting Details of President’s Condition: ‘Was Trying to Reflect Upbeat Attitude’

Earlier in the day, Trump’s team of

What’s It Like To Visit the Dentist During the Pandemic?

Health

I never feared going to have my teeth cleaned. Then the pandemic hit.


dentist chair

Photo via Getty Images

Way back when, during the simpler days of December, I made a routine appointment for a teeth cleaning. It was the sort of thing I didn’t think twice about at the time, but as the months raced by it began to take on the outsize importance of an existential question: Was I willing to risk getting COVID-19, or giving it to those around me, in the name of improving my gum health? I was caught between two poles: the knowledge that Massachusetts had one of the lowest transmission rates in the country, and my sheer horror—after months holed up at home without going anywhere unless my mouth remained duly covered—of sitting in an enclosed space with a stranger while my jaws hung open for 20 minutes straight.

As the date rapidly approached in mid-August, I leaned toward canceling. It just didn’t seem worth it, but then my dentist’s office called and walked me through the prescreening protocol. It was the same list of hygiene-theater questions we’ve all heard—Had I been running a fever? Had I been around anyone who’d tested positive?—and so forth, as though there is anyone in America this net would catch. Either you’re asymptomatic and have no idea you’re infected, or you’re a buffoon or someone who doesn’t care about other people’s safety, in which case the screening probably won’t be enough to stop you. At the end of the call, though, the scheduler caught me off-guard with six little words: “So, are you going to come?” I was still unsure: Six months into this pandemic, I remained utterly incapable of assessing risk meaningfully. Was a dentist’s office safe? As much as I fear the consequences of not getting my teeth cleaned, maybe it really wasn’t that important. Or maybe it was just important enough.

It’s the sort of constant decision-making paralysis so many of us have suffered during quarantine, and could be the reason why a a recent survey done by the American Dental Association found that less than 36 percent of Massachusetts dentists reported experiencing business as usual in August. But for me, it was combined with my lifelong struggle to make choices with the best possible outcome for the highest number of people. If you read that sentence and thought, “That sounds like it would lead to you never making a decision,” you are correct. It is a horrible way to live, and I don’t recommend it. During the pandemic alone, I have argued with myself over everything from whether shopping online or in person is more ethical to whether I could justify visiting the library. Having lived inside this particular mind for a good long time, though, I have developed an important strategy: I let myself go down whatever feverish neural pathways my brain decides are