Showing: 1 - 5 of 5 RESULTS

Residents urged to stay home as second wave widens

Canadian public health officials are warning residents to stay home as much as possible, saying the next few weeks will be critical to the country’s efforts to contain Covid-19.



a group of people standing in front of a building: People wait for Covid-19 tests in Toronto in September.


© Steve Russell/Toronto Star/Getty Images
People wait for Covid-19 tests in Toronto in September.

Last month, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declared that a second wave of the coronavirus was already underway in most of the country. Canada is at a “tipping point” in the pandemic, Trudeau said Friday.

“Not only is the second wave underway, yesterday we hit the highest daily recorded cases, well above what saw this spring,” said Trudeau during a press conference in Ottawa Friday.

The national daily case counts continue to increase sharply, with an average of about 2,000 new cases every day for the past week. That’s a 40% rise in the last week alone, according to government statistics.

Since the Covid-19 outbreak started, Canada has had a total of 175,380 cases and 9,593 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Hospitalizations and deaths continue to creep upward as well, with more than 600 patients currently in hospitals in Canada with Covid-19 and an average of about 18 deaths reported daily.

More than 80% of new infections are from Ontario and Quebec, and those under 40 account for 60% of the cases.

The province of Quebec is of particular concern, with urban hotspots in Montreal and Quebec City. Dine-in restaurants and bars were closed in those cities last week as new daily cases continue to climb.

Quebec reported 1,364 new cases of the virus on Tuesday alone, the highest daily case total since the pandemic began. That prompted a blunt warning to young people in Quebec to take the virus seriously and stay home.

Ontario joined Quebec Friday with targeted closures in its largest urban centers that include a ban on dine-in restaurants and the closure of bars. Both Toronto and Montreal, Canada’s two largest cities, have now shuttered restaurants and bars as hospitalizations increase.

“The young people that are not respecting the rule, they will have an impact on the system,” Christian Dube, Quebec’s health minister, said during a press conference in Quebec City Tuesday. “Don’t take the risk, please don’t test the hospital system.”

As recently as last month, Canada was being lauded for its efforts to flatten the curve.

Trudeau said more targeted closures, instead of a lockdown, are now possible during this second wave because more is known about how the virus is transmitted.

Despite the increase, Canada has had a small fraction of the cases of the United States, which has had 7.5 million cases and nearly 212,000 deaths.

Stay home for Thanksgiving

On Monday, Trudeau warned Canadians to stay home even for the Thanksgiving holiday next week, saying if Canada can once again flatten the curve that the country can “turn things around for Christmas.”

“We are going in the wrong direction now, which is why it is so important for Canadians to do what is necessary, to wear a

Coronavirus cases linked to beer fest in North Carolina, attendees urged to get tested

Attendees of a recent beer fest in North Carolina should consider getting tested for COVID-19 after at least two coronavirus cases were connected to the event, according to a local report.

Those who attended “Mecktoberfest” at the Olde Mecklenburg Brewery in Charlotte from Sept. 25 to 27 may have been exposed to the virus, Mecklenburg County Public Health Director Gibbie Harris told county commissioners on Tuesday, the Charlotte Observer reported. 

“There were thousands of people there. Those folks need to be tested,” Harris said, according to the newspaper.

“There were thousands of people there. Those folks need to be tested,” Harris said, according to the newspaper.
(iStock)

The event, Harris said, involved “very few masks” and “very little social distancing.”

“There were thousands of people there. Those folks need to be tested,” Harris said, according to the newspaper.

CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK AT VERMONT APPLE ORCHARD SICKENS DOZENS OF MIGRANT WORKERS

A video from local news station Fox 46 Charlotte shows a crowded beer garden, with few attendees wearing masks.

THE CORONAVIRUS CAN SURVIVE ON SKIN FOR THIS MANY HOURS, STUDY SUGGESTS

The Olde Mecklenburg Brewery “has always and will continue to work diligently to ensure that we comply with and adhere to all county, state and national health regulations and recommendations,” a spokesman for the establishment told the Charlotte Observer in a statement. He did not directly answer questions related to Harris’ warning, according to the newspaper.

“It is also perhaps the easiest place in town to enjoy a beer or a meal with friends while social distancing,” the spokesman added.

Source Article

Texas Health Care Workers Urged To Get Immunized Ahead Of Vaccine

AUSTIN, TX — Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday urged Texas health care providers to secure immunizations in order to be able to administer vaccines for the coronavirus once they are available.

To that end, health care providers are urged to enroll in the Texas Department of State Health Services’ Immunization Program. Hospitals, medical practices, pharmacies, and long-term care facilities that want to participate are required to enroll as vaccine providers at EnrollTexasIZ.dshs.texas.gov to administer COVID-19 immunizations in Texas, the governor noted.

“While potential COVID-19 vaccines continue to undergo clinical trials, the State of Texas is taking a proactive approach to ensure the vaccine is distributed as quickly as possible once available,” Abbott said in a prepared statement. “Providing Texans with access to a voluntary vaccine and efficiently administering the immunization will be essential to containing COVID-19 and protecting the health of our communities. I urge health care providers across the state to sign up for DSHS’ Immunization Program so they are prepared to administer the COVID-vaccine to Texans who choose to be immunized.”

While vaccine production ramps up, Abbott added, the supply will be limited and provided to critical populations such as health care workers or people at a higher risk of severe disease. As more doses become available, the governor said, more of the enrolled providers will begin to receive vaccine for the people they serve.

Doses of the voluntary COVID-19 vaccine and the supplies needed to administer the immunization will be provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and shipped directly to providers after they are allocated by DSHS.

Under federal guidelines, providers who choose to participate must agree to administer vaccine regardless of a recipient’s ability to pay, provide a vaccination record to each recipient, store doses of vaccine under the proper conditions, and report the number of doses received and used. Any vaccine must be authorized by the Food and Drug Administration before it can be distributed in the United States. DSHS will host opportunities for public comment and provide more information about vaccine distribution as it becomes available.

For more information on the DSHS Immunization Program, visit the Immunization Program Portal.

This article originally appeared on the Austin Patch

Source Article

Churches Urged to Go Virtual Again

The Wisconsin Council of Churches released a statement Tuesday in which they recommended churches across the state return to remote operations as the COVID-19 crisis deepens in Wisconsin.

The most recent state Executive Order to limit indoor gatherings to 25% of building capacity exempts religious services and places of worship. That means churches are free to continue operations as they have been, but the ecumenical organization recommends that that they not gather in person.

“Our obligation as faithful people is not to the minimum standard, but to behavior that demonstrates care for the most vulnerable and the well-being of the entire community,” said the Rev. Kerri Parker, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Council of Churches. “In view of the high level of COVID-19 in Wisconsin, it is neither prudent nor pastoral to gather groups of people together at this time. We urge you to put a hold on any plans for worshiping or having fellowship together in physical place for the time being.”

Approximately 25% of mainline Protestant churches are offering worship indoors so far this fall, according to the organization’s survey. The others are holding worship outdoors. Many continue worship online.

“Being a faithful people is not abstract; it is about applying our faith when it matters,” continued Rev. Parker. “This virus is not going to get itself under control. We have a responsibility to each other. We are able to worship, pray, provide faith formation and pastoral care, and address other community needs in ways that limit the risk of spreading COVID, to save lives and relieve the strain on the health system. We have a moral imperative to do so.”

The Wisconsin Council of Churches is a network of Christian churches and faith-based organizations committed to working together across differences, according to the organization.

The organization counts twenty Christian traditions representing over 2,000 congregations in its membership.

For more news and information like this, subscribe to your community’s Patch site for free! If you have an iPhone, click here to get the free Patch iPhone app; download the free Patch Android app here.

This article originally appeared on the Across Wisconsin Patch

Source Article

Doctors urged to tackle malnutrition in obesity

A recent editorial calls on doctors to address the underrecognized problem of malnutrition among individuals with obesity to help prevent early death from cardiovascular events.

A study has found that malnutrition is common among people with acute coronary syndrome, which is the sudden reduction of blood flow to the heart that causes angina or a heart attack.

The researchers — at the University Hospital Álvaro Cunqueiro in Vigo, Spain — found that malnutrition in these individuals was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality and major cardiovascular events, such as stroke or another heart attack.

Surprisingly, they found that malnutrition was common even among those with overweight or obesity.

The results appear in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In an accompanying editorial, two cardiologists write that physicians commonly perceive malnutrition to be a problem that only affects people who are “undernourished” — in other words, underweight.

In fact, individuals with overweight or obesity are often malnourished as a result of their low intake of micronutrients and the poor quality of the foods that they eat.

“Malnutrition is a largely underrecognized and undertreated condition in patients with increased body mass index, as increased abdominal girth is too often mistaken for overnutrition rather than undernutrition,” says Dr. Andrew Freeman, director of cardiovascular prevention and wellness at National Jewish Health in Denver, CO.

Dr. Freeman co-authored the editorial with Dr. Monica Aggarwal, who is an associate professor of medicine at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

“It’s important to dispel the thought that weight is correlated with food quality and that [patients with obesity] are not at risk of malnutrition,” says Dr. Freeman.

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimate that 462 million adults have underweight worldwide, whereas 1.9 billion have overweight or obesity. However, they note that the term malnutrition can apply to both of these groups.

The researchers in Spain conducted a retrospective analysis of 5,062 people admitted to the University Hospital of Vigo with acute coronary syndrome.

They calculated the body mass index (BMI) of each person and scored their nutritional status using three standard measures: the Controlling Nutritional Status score, the Nutritional Risk Index, and the Prognostic Nutritional Index.

These measures use different combinations of values, such as BMI and blood levels of albumin, white blood cells, and cholesterol, to estimate the quality of the nutrition that a person is receiving.

According to these three measures, between 8.9% and 39.5% of all of the participants — depending on the specific measure — were moderately or severely malnourished.

Although those whose BMI labeled them as having underweight were the most likely to be moderately or severely malnourished, between 8.4% and 36.7% of those whose BMI suggested they had overweight or obesity fell into these categories.

Moreover, up to 57.8% of those with overweight or obesity had some degree of malnutrition, again depending on the index used.

During the median follow-up period of 3.6 years, 20.7% of the participants had a major cardiovascular event, and 16.4% of them