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Coronavirus live updates: US reports more than 41,000 new cases

There were 41,653 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Monday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

The latest daily tally is down by less than 3,000 from the previous day and falls well under the country’s record set on July 16, when there were 77,255 new cases in a 24-hour-reporting period.

An additional 317 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded Sunday, down from a peak of 2,666 new fatalities reported on April 17.

A total of 7,804,336 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 215,086 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.

By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July. The daily tally of new cases has gradually come down since then but has started to climb again in recent weeks.

Week-over-week comparisons show the number of new cases reported across the nation continues to go up, as does the usage of intensive care units, but the number of new deaths are down, according to an internal memo from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that was obtained by ABC News last week.

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Washington Coronavirus Updates Paused Until Tuesday Afternoon

SEATTLE, WA — A glitch in Washington’s coronavirus reporting system kept the state from releasing coronavirus updates for a second day, officials announced Monday.

On Sunday, the Washington State Department of Health said a data processing issue prevented its dashboards from reflecting up-to-date information. Full reporting had been expected to resume the next day. But on Monday afternoon, the state said it would require another day to complete the fix.

On October 11, the Washington State Department of Health discovered a data issue that required a rollback of the COVID-19 data dashboard to include only data current as of 11:59 p.m. on 10/9/2020. We will need until tomorrow to fully test and implement required revisions and update this dashboard. This issue also means that the COVID-19 risk assessment dashboard reflects data current as of 11:59 p.m. on 10/8/2020.

We plan to update both dashboards tomorrow afternoon (10/13/2020). We apologize for any confusion this delay may cause.

As of 11:59 p.m. Friday, 93,035 patients had tested positive in the state since the crisis began, and at least 2,190 people have died from complications linked to COVID-19. Over the last seven days, 3,988 new illnesses have been confirmed in Washington, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s case tracker.

Despite ongoing issues on the state level, county-level reporting remains functional. In King County, Public Health reported 152 new cases Monday as several “key indicators” continued to trend in the wrong direction.

In recent weeks, the state’s most populous county briefly fell to the low end of the moderate range for case counts reported over 14 days. But the latest update shows King County back above the threshold for the highest bracket, at 86 cases per 100,000 residents, and well above the target range. Public Health – Seattle & King County has scheduled a Tuesday afternoon news conference to discuss COVID-19 spread.

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Here are the statewide totals, broken down by county, from the last available update:

County

Confirmed Cases

Hospitalizations

Deaths

Adams

887

52

10

Asotin

146

16

5

Benton

4,797

402

132

Chelan

1,908

76

16

Clallam

243

8

1

Clark

3,667

305

69

Columbia

14

3

1

Cowlitz

719

44

7

Douglas

1,202

60

9

Ferry

30

1

0

Franklin

4,476

319

66

Garfield

13

0

0

Grant

3,115

158

23

Grays Harbor

573

39

11

Island

330

38

12

Jefferson

76

11

0

King

23,805

2,492

784

Kitsap

1,356

107

16

Kittitas

593

24

22

Klickitat

202

11

3

Lewis

621

45

8

Lincoln

63

3

1

Mason

464

25

8

Okanogan

1,069

48

10

Pacific

95

8

3

Pend Oreille

104

7

0

Pierce

8,648

894

210

San Juan

29

2

0

Skagit

1,160

99

22

Skamania

65

6

1

Snohomish

7,434

836

218

Spokane

7,830

534

178

Stevens

213

19

3

Thurston

1,269

113

20

Wahkiakum

7

0

0

Walla Walla

945

57

6

Whatcom

1,448

102

48

Whitman

1,509

12

1

Yakima

11,566

802

263

Unassigned

344

8

3

Total

93,035

2020 Election Live Updates: Trump Will Hit the Trail as the Barrett Hearings Begin

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

The event that conservatives hoped would reshape the 2020 election is upon us: The Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett begin Monday at 9 a.m. Eastern time and promise to last most of the week. Republicans have regarded her nomination as an opportunity to reinvigorate voters on the right and refocus the broader electorate on matters other than the coronavirus pandemic.

So far, Judge Barrett’s appointment has not worked out that way. The White House event at which President Trump announced her election became a major transmission point for the coronavirus — Dr. Anthony S. Fauci called it a “super-spreader event” — and at least two Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee have been infected. Mr. Trump’s bout with the disease, and rising case counts across most of the country, have relegated the Supreme Court fight to the political background for most of the last few weeks.

There is still hope within the G.O.P. that Democrats might fumble the hearings in a way that could be politically useful to them — a concern some Democrats share, given the apparently diminished capacities of Senator Dianne Feinstein of California, the top Democrat on the panel that will screen the nomination. And at the very least, the hearings give Republicans something to talk about besides Mr. Trump and the virus, even if that is where most voters remain focused. That could be no small favor in red states where Senate seats are at stake.

It is unlikely, however, that Mr. Trump will cooperate with efforts to shift the spotlight this week. He is due on Monday to campaign in Florida, making his first in-person appearance outside Washington since he tested positive for the coronavirus. The president’s insistence on returning to the campaign trail while there are still huge unanswered questions about his medical condition, including about the continued presence of the coronavirus in his body and his ability to transmit it to others, has the potential to become a bigger story than the opening stages of the judicial confirmation process.

That may be doubly the case if Mr. Trump and his supporters continue their practice of flouting basic public-health guidelines for large events, as has been their tendency up to this point.

The question for Democrats — not just Joseph R. Biden Jr. but the party’s whole ticket — may be how much time and political capital they will put into making a strenuous public case against Judge Barrett, at a moment when Mr. Trump continues to serve up generous quantities of easier political fodder for the election that is only weeks away.

Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

Coronavirus live updates: Mexico confirms 1st case of someone with both COVID-19 and influenza

There were 44,614 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Sunday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

The latest daily tally is down by more than 10,000 from the previous day and falls well under the country’s record set on July 16, when there were 77,255 new cases in a 24-hour-reporting period.

An additional 400 coronavirus-related fatalities were also recorded Sunday, down from a peak of 2,666 new fatalities reported on April 17.

A total of 7,762,809 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 214,771 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.

By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July. The daily tally of new cases has gradually come down since then but has started to climb again in recent weeks.

Week-over-week comparisons show the number of new cases reported across the nation continues to go up, as does the usage of intensive care units, but the number of new deaths are down, according to an internal memo from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that was obtained by ABC News last week.

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Covid-19 Live Updates: Fauci Says a Trump Campaign Ad Misrepresented His Comments

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Pool photo by Graeme Jennings

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the U.S. government’s top infectious disease expert, took issue Sunday with a decision by the Trump campaign to feature him in an advertisement without his consent and said it had misrepresented his comments.

“I was totally surprised,” Dr. Fauci said. “The use of my name and my words by the G.O.P. campaign was done without my permission, and the actual words themselves were taken out of context, based on something that I said months ago regarding the entire effort of the task force.”

CNN first reported Dr. Fauci’s displeasure with the campaign ad.

The spot seeks to use Mr. Trump’s illness with Covid-19 and apparent recovery to improve the negative image many Americans have of his handling of the coronavirus.

“I can’t imagine that anybody could be doing more,” the ad shows Dr. Fauci saying — though in fact he was talking about the broader government effort.

Dr. Fauci, who said he had never publicly endorsed a political candidate in decades of public work, has long had an uneasy relationship with President Trump. Just a little over a week ago, he clashed with his boss over his position on mask-wearing.

In his debate with former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Mr. Trump claimed that Dr. Fauci had initially said “masks are not good — then he changed his mind.” When Mr. Biden said wearing masks could save tens of thousands of lives, Mr. Trump contended that “Dr. Fauci said the opposite.”

In fact, in the early days of the pandemic, Dr. Fauci and other health experts discouraged the general public from rushing out to buy masks because they were worried about shortages for health workers. Their position changed when it became clear that asymptomatic transmission was spreading the virus.

Dr. Fauci may favor measured language, but his criticisms of the White House — and, implicitly, the man in the Oval Office — over the handling of the pandemic have not gone unnoticed — including by hard-core Trump supporters who claim he is part of a “deep state” conspiracy to undermine the president.

On Friday, Dr. Fauci called the White House ceremony announcing Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court a “superspreader event.”

“It was in a situation where people were crowded together and not wearing masks,” he said. “The data speak for themselves.”

Judge Barrett’s confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee begins on Monday. The proceedings will play out partially by video to allow senators who may be sick or worried about infection to participate remotely. No members of the public will be allowed in the hearing room, which will be sparsely populated with senators and spectators.

Latest coronavirus news for Oct. 11, 2020: Live updates

The Latest

Illinois’ positivity rate creeps back up to 4% with latest 2,905 coronavirus infections

Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-Times

Illinois’ average coronavirus testing positivity rate rose to 4% for the first time in a month on Saturday as public health officials announced 2,905 more people have contracted the virus statewide.

The Illinois Department of Public Health also reported 31 more deaths were attributed to COVID-19, raising the state’s death toll to 8,975.

Illinois has recorded some of its highest daily case totals of the entire seven-month pandemic over the last week, due mostly to the fact that more people are being tested per day.

The latest cases were confirmed among 66,256 tests, while on average more than 55,000 tests have been administered daily statewide over the last month — almost triple the testing rate during the worst days of the pandemic in May.

Read the full story here.


News

7:42 a.m. Trump’s doctor says the president is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s doctor said Saturday the president is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus.

In a memo, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley says Trump meets the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for safely discontinuing isolation and that by “currently recognized standards” he is no longer considered a transmission risk.

Read the full story here.

7 a.m. Belmont Snack Shop’s future uncertain after coronavirus, devastating fire

The future of the Belmont Snack Shop is up in the air after a fierce fire engulfed the late-night diner and left behind only charred remnants of the Avondale staple.

Restaurant manager Nelson Rodriguez and his wife, who live in an apartment above the diner near Belmont and Kimball, were cooking dinner Thursday night around 7:50 p.m. when they spotted smoke rising outside their window.

Rodriguez bolted downstairs to try to put out the grease fire, but he was too late.

After evacuating the restaurant, Rodriguez stood beside his wife watching the blaze and smoke destroy the diner that has been in his family for two generations.

Read the full story by Madeline Kenney here.


New cases

  • Downstate Rep. Mike Bost, an Illinois Trump campaign chair, tests positive for COVID-19
  • Public health officials reported 3,059 newly confirmed cases of COVID-19 across Illinois on Thursday, the state’s biggest caseload since the initial peak of the pandemic nearly five months ago.
  • The state last topped 3,000 daily coronavirus cases on May 14, when 3,239 people were infected.
  • The Illinois Department for Public Health reported more than 5,300 cases on Sept. 4, but that bloated figure was the result of a three-day data processing backlog.

Analysis & Commentary

7:26 a.m. Take it from the best of American medicine: Donald Trump must go

It is rare for scientists at the highest levels to take an overt stand on the politics of the day, knowing their professional credibility depends on remaining above the fray.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, most famously, is a case in point. Fauci, the federal government’s top

Coronavirus updates: Birx warns of ‘troubling signs’ in Northeast amid ‘very different’ spread of COVID-19

“What we did in the spring is not going to work in the fall,” Birx said.

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1 million people worldwide.

Over 36.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has varied from country-to-country. Still, the actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

The United States is the worst-affected country, with more than 7.6 million diagnosed cases and at least 213,570 deaths.

California has the most cases of any U.S. state, with more than 847,000 people diagnosed, according to Johns Hopkins data. California is followed by Texas and Florida, with over 811,000 cases and over 728,000 cases, respectively.

More than 190 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least 10 of which are in crucial phase three studies. Of those 10 potential vaccines in late-stage trials, there are currently five that will be available in the United States if approved.

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Coronavirus in Illinois updates: Here’s what happened Oct. 7 with COVID-19 in the Chicago area

Officials reported 58,820 new tests in the last 24 hours, as the state surpasses 6 million total COVID-19 tests. The seven-day statewide positivity rate is 3.5%.

The new statewide numbers come as Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Wednesday that the gains that most regions in Illinois had been making in bringing down COVID-19 positivity rates in recent weeks have “cooled off a bit.” The governor noted specifically that the northeastern region that includes Lake and McHenry counties has seen a reversal after a period of decline.

“That progress has cooled off a bit, across Illinois,” Pritzker said. “We are seeing changes in positivity averages around the state level off, with three regions that were decreasing last week now sitting at a stable level.”

Here’s what’s happening Wednesday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

7:15 p.m.: CPS says clerks must report to work in person, despite labor ruling that questions COVID-19 protections in schools. CTU says the action ‘threatens jobs.’

Despite an arbitrator’s ruling that certain Chicago Public Schools employees should be allowed to work from home when feasible during remote learning, the district is continuing to require them to work in person.

An email from Chief Talent Officer Matt Lyons sent late Tuesday told clerks, clerk assistants and technology coordinators that the expectations have not changed.

“As critical members of our school community, you are integral in our collective work communicating and supporting families, staff, and students,” the email states. “This means you will continue to be expected to report to work in person, unless you have an approved or pending request for a leave of absence or accommodation.

“You may have received conflicting information recently on this reporting requirement,” the email continued, “but we are writing today to confirm CPS’ expectation and directive to report to work onsite.”

Without a leave of absence or accommodation request approved or pending, employees are not allowed to work from home, according to the email, which states that if employees don’t show up in person, “CPS will consider your absence unauthorized and proceed accordingly.”

The Chicago Teachers Union is interpreting the email as a threat of discipline and an attempt “to strongarm workers into schools in defiance of the ruling.” The union also claims CPS is stalling on bargaining over remedies.

6:55 p.m.: The Purple Pig employees hold protest over concerns of coronavirus safety negligence

After spending much of Tuesday night calling colleagues at The Purple Pig, Ryan Love felt upbeat about the five people who committed to picketing the Chicago restaurant Wednesday morning.

The protest, which ended up being four people greeting passersby with signs saying, “211K Americans dead. Tapas anyone?” and “No transparency, no accountability,” was inspired by frustration over the perceived actions of restaurant chef and owner Jimmy Bannos Jr. and other members of management. Love contends they did not take appropriate steps to keep employees and guests safe after a staff member tested positive for COVID-19 on Sept. 24.

Love, a lead server and bartender, said a full

Ex-N.J. Gov. Chris Christie spends 5th day in hospital for COVID-19. Updates on care and his spirits.

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is spending his fifth day in the hospital after contracting COVID-19, but he’s in good spirits and under good care, a source with knowledge of the situation confirmed to NJ Advance Media.

Christie’s exact condition remains unknown. The 58-year-old has not tweeted since Saturday, the day he announced he tested positive for the coronavirus and checked himself into Morristown Medical Center.

Christie’s stay is currently in line with an average COVID-19 hospitalization. Five days is the median length of hospital stays for coronavirus patients outside of China, according to an analysis of 52 studies published last month in BMC Medicine.

Meanwhile, the source, who asked for anonymity to speak candidly about the matter, shot down a rumor that bounced around social media Wednesday morning that Christie was on a ventilator.

Matt Katz, a reporter for New York public radio station WNYC, also tweeted Wednesday afternoon that multiple people close to Christie say the rumor was untrue.

Only the most severe coronavirus patients required to be put on a ventilator, a life-saving machine that helps patients breathe.

Of the 591 patients across across New Jersey’s 71 hospitals with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases as of Tuesday night, 45 — or about 8% — were on ventilators, according to the state’s tracing website.

MORE: Here’s the type of treatments doctors say Christie may be getting

Christie announced Saturday morning he tested positive for the the coronavirus — a day after President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump announced they had tested positive. Since then, more than a dozen aides and officials in Trump’s orbit have also tested positive.

Christie — who has struggled with his weight and has a lifelong history of asthma — tweeted Saturday night that despite “feeling good” and having only “mild symptoms,” he checked himself into the hospital Saturday as a precautionary measure. Because of his conditions, he’s at higher risk of developing complications from the virus.

The Mendham resident hasn’t shared what symptoms he has or how he’s being treated.

Star-Ledger columnist Tom Moran spoke on the phone with Christie on Monday. The ex-governor said King Abdullah of Jordan had called to wish him well, ribbing Moran, who had doubted their friendship in a 2012 column. Moran also wrote Christie sounded “raspy but didn’t cough once” during their 10-minute phone call, and that Christie would not discuss his condition.

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Homepage

In the week before his positive test, Christie spent four days helping Trump prepare for the first presidential debate, often in a room with five or six people where no one wore masks. Christie — a longtime Trump friend and ally and fellow Republican — also attended the now-infamous Rose Garden ceremony where Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

At least 10 others at the Rose Garden event on Sept. 28 have since tested positive, including New Jersey natives Kellyanne Conway, a former adviser to the

COVID-19 in Illinois updates: Here’s what’s happening Thursday

The daily number of new known coronavirus cases announced by Illinois officials on Thursday was the highest in nearly five months, except for a day in early September when the state caught up on a testing backlog.

The 3,059 new known cases represents the first time the daily count has topped 3,000 since May 14, when the Illinois Department of Public Health reported 3,239 cases. The department reported 5,368 new cases on Sept. 4, but that was due to a backlog in processing test results.

In addition to the newly confirmed cases, which bring the total number known infections to 310,700 statewide since the pandemic began, officials on Thursday reported 32 more fatalities. That brings the death toll to 8,910. Officials also reported 72,491 new tests in the last 24 hours. The seven-day statewide positivity rate is 3.7%.

The new numbers come as Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Wednesday that the gains that most regions in Illinois had been making in bringing down COVID-19 positivity rates in recent weeks have “cooled off a bit.” The governor noted specifically that the northeastern region that includes Lake and McHenry counties has seen a reversal after a period of decline.

Here’s what’s happening Thursday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

6:20 p.m.: IHSA doctor says high school basketball could happen in Illinois if players wear masks

The senior member of the Illinois High School Association’s sports medicine advisory committee said Thursday that high school basketball might be possible this year if all players wear masks.

Dr. Preston Wolin said that idea is being considered by the Illinois Department of Public Health, whose COVID-19 guidelines place restrictions on high school and youth sports. As of now, basketball is considered a medium risk for virus transmission, meaning athletes can scrimmage but not compete against other schools.

The high school basketball season is supposed to start Nov. 16.

Wolin said recent communication between the IHSA and the state has included “a draft considering allowing a basketball season to proceed with everybody being masked. As to whether there is actually an IDPH policy that has been promulgated describing this, that I don’t think I can answer.”

Asked for comment, an IDPH spokeswoman responded: “There are no updates to the guidance planned at this time.”

An IHSA spokesman did not return a request for comment.

5:05 p.m.: Winnetka businessman charged with price gouging in sale of protective masks during pandemic

A North Shore businessman was charged in federal court in Chicago on Thursday with illegally price gouging customers seeking to purchase protective masks amid the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Krikor Topouzian, 60, of Winnetka, was charged in a criminal information with violating anti-price gouging laws. The charge carries a maximum of one year in prison.

According to the charge, Topouzian, who owns a medical supply company based in Skokie, accumulated in March and April a stockpile of nearly 80,000 respirator masks, including N95 masks, for roughly just over $5 per mask.

Topouzian later sold nearly 40,000