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Doctor says Trump no longer a transmission risk to others

The White House did not say, however, if the president has tested negative for the virus

On Saturday night, a little over a week after President Donald Trump announced his COVID-19 diagnosis, White House physician Sean Conley released a memo stating that the president “no longer poses an infection risk” to others.

The White House did not say, however, if the president has tested negative for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that, in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” Conley wrote in the memo.

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According to The Hill, the White House has not provided the exact date when the president last tested negative for COVID-19. But Conley’s memo gives Trump permission to resume holding public gatherings.

Read More: Trump makes 1st public appearance since his hospital stay

On Saturday, the president spoke from a balcony to hundreds of supports standing on the South Lawn of the White House. At the event, social distancing guidelines were ignored and mask-wearing was minimal at best, showing that Trump’s approach to the virus has not changed, despite being personally stricken by the disease that has killed almost 215,000 in the country at Sunday afternoon’s check of Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that most patients should isolate for at least 10 days after the start of their symptoms, and can end isolation at the point where their symptoms ebb and they have gone at least 24 hours without a fever. However, the agency says that some severely ill patients may need to isolate for 20 days.

Read More: Trump to give White House balcony speech on ‘law and order’

In the memo, Conley also said that Trump has been “fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved,” but he did not specify the last time the president had a fever.

Conley wrote that diagnostic tests indicated “there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus.” Conley said that moving forward, he will continue to clinically monitor the president as he returns to an active schedule.

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The post Doctor says Trump no longer a transmission risk to others appeared first on TheGrio.

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Community Transmission Extent Remains Low In Northern Virginia

VIRGINIA — On Sunday, 811 additional coronavirus cases and four deaths were reported in Virginia. The cumulative case total is 158,716, while 11,519 people have been hospitalized and 3,358 have died.

Most of the regions moderate community transmission, according to the VDH Pandemic Metrics Dashboard on transmission extent. Here is the outlook for the regions in the week ending on Oct. 3:

  • Northern: Low community transmission, decreasing trend

  • Northwest: Moderate community transmission, fluctuating trend

  • Eastern: Moderate community transmission, decreasing trend

  • Central: Moderate community transmission, decreasing trend

  • Near southwest: Substantial community transmission, fluctuating trend

  • Far southwest: Moderate community transmission, fluctuating trend

Across Virginia, 2,256,820 PCR tests have been completed, an increase of 18,616 from Saturday. The statewide positive average of PCR tests stands at 4.6 percent as of Oct. 7.

According to the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association, there are 924 current COVID-19 hospitalizations across the state. That includes 201 patients in the intensive care units and 98 on ventilators. Ventilator use among all hospital patients is at 22 percent, while ICU occupancy is at 79 percent. No hospitals are experiencing difficulty obtaining personal protective equipment or other medical supplies in the next 72 hours. There have been 18,492 COVID-19 patients discharged from hospitals as of Sunday.

Here is the latest breakdown of cases and deaths by age group:

  • 0-9: 5,873 cases, 0 deaths

  • 10-19: 15,880 cases, 1 death

  • 20-29: 32,971 cases, 7 deaths

  • 30-39: 27,033 cases, 32 deaths

  • 40-49: 24,259 cases, 90 deaths

  • 50-59: 22,181 cases, 233 deaths

  • 60-69: 14,596 cases, 531 deaths

  • 70-79: 7,768 cases, 855 deaths

  • 80 and up: 6,845 cases, 1,605 deaths

  • Not reported: 1,310 cases, 4 deaths

Here are the latest coronavirus data updates for our coverage area between Saturday and Sunday:

  • Alexandria: 4,027 cases, 323 hospitalizations, 73 deaths; increase of 18 cases

  • Arlington County: 4,187 cases, 510 hospitalizations, 152 deaths; increase of 17 cases

  • Fairfax County: 21,952 cases, 2,191 hospitalizations, 599 deaths; increase of 91 cases and one hospitalization

  • Fairfax City: 144 cases, 13 hospitalizations, eight deaths; increase of one case

  • Falls Church: 74 cases, 13 hospitalizations, seven deaths; no changes

  • Loudoun County: 7,217 cases, 447 hospitalizations, 128 deaths; increase of 36 cases

  • Manassas: 1,982 cases, 130 hospitalizations, 24 deaths; increase of two cases

  • Manassas Park: 625 cases, 56 hospitalizations, eight deaths; increase of one case

  • Prince William County: 13,110 cases, 944 hospitalizations, 213 deaths; increase of 31 cases and one hospitalization

  • Fredericksburg: 566 cases, 50 hospitalizations, five deaths; increase of three cases

  • Spotsylvania County: 2,260 cases, 138 hospitalizations, 46 deaths; increase of 10 cases

  • Stafford County: 2,155 cases, 165 hospitalizations, 19 deaths; increase of 17 cases

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This article originally appeared on the Kingstowne-Rose Hill Patch

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Trump No Longer a COVID-19 ‘Transmission Risk,’ White House Doctor Says

President Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, his doctor said Saturday evening, nine days after the president first tested positive for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Conley added.

Conley’s announcement came hours after Trump held his first public event since his October 1 diagnosis, which had been followed by a three-day stay at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Ahead of the event, the White House would not say whether Trump had yet tested negative for the coronavirus.

Trump delivered remarks in a brief 18-minute address on law and order from the White House balcony to a crowd of several hundred mostly- masked supporters on the South Lawn.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, only briefly mentioning his health.

He said he was thankful for the good wishes and prayers he received and said the pandemic was “disappearing,” though it has killed more than 210,000 Americans and shows no signs of slowing down.

Conley issued a statement Thursday evening saying that he anticipated Trump would be able to hold public events again by Saturday.

“Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley wrote, adding that, “Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the president’s safe return to public engagement at that time.”

The president has also announced he would hold a campaign rally on Monday in Florida, as well.

More than two dozen coronavirus cases have been tied to the White House or people who spent time with Trump, according to NPR. A number of attendees of the White House’s ceremony for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett have tested positive, including the president, several top staffers, senators and military officials. 

Dr. Anthony Fauci on Friday called the September 26 event in the Rose Garden, in which most attendees closely mingled mask-less, a “super-spreader” for the coronavirus.

Ahead of Trump’s Saturday remarks on law and order, in a show of newfound concern over the virus, guests were asked to wear a mask on the White House grounds and told they would be subject to temperature checks and a brief questionnaire about recent symptoms, the Wall Street Journal reported.

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CDC revises coronavirus guidance to acknowledge that it spreads through airborne transmission

3D illustration of coronavirus on a colored background.

Leonello Calvetti | Stocktrek Images | Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revised its coronavirus guidance Monday, acknowledging that it can sometimes spread through airborne particles that can “linger in the air for minutes to hours” and among people who are more than 6 feet apart.

The CDC cited published reports that demonstrated “limited, uncommon circumstances where people with COVID-19 infected others who were more than 6 feet away or shortly after the COVID-19-positive person left an area.”

“In these instances, transmission occurred in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces that often involved activities that caused heavier breathing, like singing or exercise,” the CDC said in a statement. “Such environments and activities may contribute to the buildup of virus-carrying particles.”

The agency added that it is “much more common” for the virus to spread through larger respiratory droplets that are produced when somebody coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes. People are infected through such droplets mostly when they are in close contact with an infected person, the CDC said. 

“CDC’s recommendations remain the same based on existing science and after a thorough technical review of the guidance,” the agency said. “People can protect themselves from the virus that causes COVID-19 by staying at least 6 feet away from others, wearing a mask that covers their nose and mouth, washing their hands frequently, cleaning touched surfaces often and staying home when sick.”

The updated guidance comes after the agency mistakenly posted a revision last month that said the virus could spread through aerosols, small droplets that can linger in the air. The guidance was quickly removed from the CDC’s website because it was just “a draft version of proposed changes,” the agency said.

To what degree the coronavirus can spread through airborne particles has been a contentious debate among scientists for months. Some epidemiologists have charged that the World Health Organization as well as federal regulatory agencies in many countries have been slow to accept that the virus can spread by air. It’s a debate that could have implications for the importance of air filtration in reopening businesses and schools. 

Dr. Bill Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University, said the new guidance is largely in line with what he says the science indicates about the coronavirus spreading through the air. He said in a phone interview after reviewing the new guidance that airborne transmission is something of a “side street” for spread. 

“Some cars do get through on the side street,” he said. “But the highways of transmission are close in, usually within enclosed spaces and for periods of time longer than 15 minutes with people standing within 3 to 6 feet of each other.”

Schaffner added that the new guidance doesn’t necessarily change how he thinks about reducing the risk of infection for most people. Wearing a mask, socially distancing and avoiding large indoor gatherings remain the most important steps people can take, he said. 

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CDC updates coronavirus guidelines to include airborne transmission

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says COVID-19 can be spread through airborne transmission, according to updated guidance on the agency’s website. The update, which is now available on the agency’s “How It Spreads” page, says that people who are more than six feet away from each can still become infected from droplets that hang in the air, especially in enclosed spaces that have poor ventilation.

The revised guidance comes after the CDC updated its website to include airborne transmission last month, but then removed the information, saying it was still under review. Now, the CDC compares the respiratory spread possibility to different infections like tuberculosis, measles, and chickenpox, all viruses that spread through airborne transmission. 

“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than six feet away,” reads the new guidance. “These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising.”

So what does this mean for the average person? The CDC still asserts that close contact with someone infected with COVID-19 is the most common way to contract and spread the disease. However, the guidance on airborne transmission confirms that going maskless in poorly ventilated areas, such as restaurants and bars, where a person with COVID-19 has been could still result in infection. 

The news comes as cases in the U.S. continue to rise. Even the White House found COVID-19 hard to escape as President Trump announced he and first lady Melania Trump had both tested positive for the virus — just hours after aide Hope Hicks tested positive. Since then, more White House officials and others close to Mr. Trump and staff have also begun to test positive, including White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany. With the U.S. still leading the world in virus cases, experts hope the updated guidelines might keep residents at home and away from crowded spaces as much as possible. 

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CDC says coronavirus can spread through airborne transmission

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Monday that coronavirus can spread through “airborne transmission” to people who are more than 6 feet away under certain conditions. 

The update on the agency’s website is an important change to the understanding of how the virus spreads, and one that many experts have been pointing to for months.  

The new guidance comes after the CDC sparked confusion last month by posting a document online about airborne transmission, only to take it down and say it was still being reviewed. 

Now, the agency has finally posted the guidance, which is careful to say that airborne transmission “sometimes” happens but that the virus “most commonly” spreads between people who are within 6 feet of each other. 

The danger of airborne transmission beyond 6 feet largely occurs indoors in poorly ventilated space, which is part of the reason why outdoor activities are considered safer. 

“CDC continues to believe, based on current science, that people are more likely to become infected the longer and closer they are to a person with COVID-19,” the agency said in a statement. “Today’s update acknowledges the existence of some published reports showing limited, uncommon circumstances where people with COVID-19 infected others who were more than 6 feet away or shortly after the COVID-19-positive person left an area. In these instances, transmission occurred in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces that often involved activities that caused heavier breathing, like singing or exercise.” 

The CDC continues to advise people to avoid spreading the virus by staying six feet away from others, wearing a mask, and washing their hands. To help prevent airborne transmission, which occurs through smaller particles that can linger in the air, the CDC also advises: “Avoid crowded indoor spaces and ensure indoor spaces are properly ventilated by bringing in outdoor air as much as possible. In general, being outdoors and in spaces with good ventilation reduces the risk of exposure to infectious respiratory droplets.”

Linsey Marr, a Virginia Tech professor who has long warned of airborne transmission of coronavirus, wrote on Twitter that the document is “an accurate, sorely-needed update acknowledging airborne spread and importance of masks at all times around others and of ventilation. Hooray!”

–Updated at 2:22 p.m.

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N.J. reports 637 new coronavirus cases, 1 new death. Rate of transmission rises for 7th consecutive day.

New Jersey reported 637 new coronavirus positive tests and one additional death on Sunday as the state’s rate of transmission climbed for the 7th consecutive day and has remained above the key benchmark indicating the outbreak is expanding for the past month.

Ocean County, a COVID-19 hotspot that has emerged in recent weeks, once again led the state with 150 new cases. Gov. Phil Murphy traveled to the county on Friday to discuss the ongoing outbreak there, which has been linked to Lakewood and its significant Orthodox Jewish community.

The statewide rate of transmission increased to 1.26, up from 1.24 a day earlier and marking a week of steady increases. The transmission rate was 1.11 last Sunday. Any number above 1 indicates that each new case, on average, is leading to at least one additional case and the outbreak is growing. The rate remains is now the highest it’s been since 1.32 on Aug. 5.

Hospitalizations related to COVID-19 across the state remained below 500 for the second day, with 480 patients across 71 hospitals.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the latest figures on social media. He did not reveal when the newly reported deaths occurred.

The update comes as the state continues an investigation into whether people were infected at a fundraiser President Donald Trump held at his Bedminster golf course Thursday, hours before he announced he tested positive for the virus. Everyone in attendance has been asked to self-quarantine and get tested, Murphy said. As many as 300 people attended the fundraiser, and some paid for a photo opportunity with the president.

Trump remained Sunday at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where doctors say his condition is improving and he could be discharged by Monday.

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tested positive for the virus on Friday, after spending time with Trump for the presidential debate on Tuesday and attending the formal nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. Christie, who has asthma, was admitted to Morristown Medical Center in what he called a preventative measure Saturday afternoon.

Fellow New Jersey natives Kellyanne Conway, a former Trump advisor, and Bill Stepien, Trump’s campaign manager, have also tested positive for the virus.

New Jersey has reported a total of 208,202 COVID-19 cases out of more than 3.73 million tests administered in the nearly seven months since the state announced its first positive test March 4. That’s the eight most positive tests among American states.

The state of 9 million people has reported 16,136 deaths attributed to the virus in that time — 14,349 lab-confirmed and 1,787 considered probable. The state’s death toll is third highest in the U.S., after New York and Texas, which recently surpassed New Jersey. California is closely behind New Jersey, with 11 fewer deaths. The Garden State has the nation’s highest COVID-19 death rate per 100,000 residents.

New Jersey’s daily numbers have decreased dramatically over the summer after peaking in April, when officials routinely announced hundreds of new deaths