Showing: 1 - 9 of 9 RESULTS

Asia Today: China city says it’s tested 3 million for virus

Authorities in the eastern Chinese port city of Qingdao said they have completed coronavirus tests on more than 3 million people following the country’s first reported local outbreak of the virus in nearly two months

The National Health Commission, however, said Tuesday that at least six new cases of the virus were found in Qingdao in the past 24 hours.

The reason for the discrepancy was not immediately clear. China’s methods for logging and reporting of virus numbers has been questioned since the pandemic first began late last year in its city of Wuhan.

The National Health Commission numbers released Tuesday reported a total of 30 new virus cases in the previous 24 hours nationwide. It broke down those numbers into 13 cases in which people had symptoms and 17 cases in which they had no symptoms. The total number of locally transmitted cases, both with and without symptoms, was 11, while the rest were listed as imported.

China has reported a total of 4,634 deaths from coronavirus among 85,591 cases it has reported. It has not provided a running total of asymptomatic cases, believed to number in the thousands.

Qingdao is a major commercial harbor and industrial center known for electronics and the country’s most famous brewery, as well as the home of the Chinese navy’s northern fleet.

China’s last reported local outbreak was in the northwestern city of Urumqi in the far western Xinjiang region, with all cases since then found among those arriving from outside China.

China has relaxed masking and social distancing requirements in the wake of falling case numbers, but has maintained robust testing as it seeks to return the economy to full functioning.

In other developments in the Asia-Pacific region:

— South Korea has reported 102 new cases of the coronavirus, its first daily increase of more than 100 in six days. The rise is a cause of concern as officials lowered social distancing restrictions this week after

Asia Today: China City Says It’s Tested 3 Million for Virus | World News

BEIJING (AP) — Authorities in the eastern Chinese port city of Qingdao said Tuesday that they have completed coronavirus tests on more than 3 million people following the country’s first reported local outbreak of the virus in nearly two months.

The city’s health department said no new positive cases had been found among the more than 1.1 million test results returned thus far. The city said it had a total of 12 cases, six with symptoms and six without, since the new outbreak was first spotted over the weekend at a hospital.

The National Health Commission, however, said Tuesday that at least six new cases of the virus were found in Qingdao in the past 24 hours.

The reason for the discrepancy was not immediately clear. China’s methods for logging and reporting of virus numbers has been questioned since the pandemic first began late last year in its city of Wuhan.

The National Health Commission numbers released Tuesday reported a total of 30 new virus cases in the previous 24 hours nationwide. It broke down those numbers into 13 cases in which people had symptoms and 17 cases in which they had no symptoms. The total number of locally transmitted cases, both with and without symptoms, was 11, while the rest were listed as imported.

China has reported a total of 4,634 deaths from coronavirus among 85,591 cases it has reported. It has not provided a running total of asymptomatic cases, believed to number in the thousands.

Authorities in Qingdao have said they plan to test all 9 million people in the city by the end of the week, similar to previous mass testing campaigns in other cities where outbreaks have been detected. Testing began with “close contacts, close contacts of those close contacts and more casual contacts,” gradually expanding to all districts of the city, the health department said.

Qingdao is a major commercial harbor and industrial center known for electronics and the country’s most famous brewery, as well as the home of the Chinese navy’s northern fleet.

China’s last reported local outbreak was in the northwestern city of Urumqi in the far western Xinjiang region, with all cases since then found among those arriving from outside China.

China has relaxed masking and social distancing requirements in the wake of falling case numbers, but has maintained robust testing as it seeks to return the economy to full functioning.

In other developments in the Asia-Pacific region:

— South Korea has reported 102 new cases of the coronavirus, its first daily increase of more than 100 in six days. The rise is a cause of concern as officials lowered social distancing restrictions this week after concluding that the viral spread was slowing after a spike in mid-August. The figures released by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency brought the national totals since the pandemic began to 24,805 infections and 434 deaths. Fifty-eight of the new cases was reported from the Seoul metropolitan area, while 33 of the new cases have

Asia Today: Australian state warns non-complying public | St. Louis business news

Subscribe for $3 for 3 months

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The premier of Australia’s Victoria state is stepping up his fight with members of the public who don’t comply with pandemic regulations, saying close contacts of those infected who refuse a test will have to spend 21 days in quarantine.

The state government has announced mandatory quarantine will be extended by 10 days for close contacts if they decide not to be tested on the 11th day of isolation. The change will come into effect at midnight Sunday.

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said a “very, very high percentage” of people had submitted to testing but the rule was designed to provide authorities with an even more complete picture.

“This is just double-checking, triple-checking that you haven’t, in fact, still got the virus,” he said.

Victoria reported one more death and 12 new cases on Sunday, ending a three-day stretch without a fatality. The figures take Victoria’s death count from the virus to 810 and the national toll to 898.

Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Source Article

Trump hopes to be released from hospital today

President Donald Trump was hoping for a Monday discharge from the military hospital where he is being treated for COVID-19, a day after he briefly ventured out while contagious to salute cheering supporters by motorcade in a move that disregarded precautions meant to contain the deadly virus that has killed more than 209,000 Americans.

White House officials said Trump was anxious to be released after three nights at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where doctors revealed on Sunday that his blood oxygen level dropped suddenly twice in recent days and that they gave him a steroid typically only recommended for the very sick. Still, the doctors said Trump’s health is improving and volunteered that he could be discharged as early as Monday to continue the remainder of his treatment at the White House.

“This is an important day as the president continues to improve and is ready to get back to a normal work schedule,” White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told Fox News on Monday. He said the determination on whether Trump would leave the hospital won’t be made until later in the day after the president is evaluated by his medical team, but that Trump was “optimistic” he could be released Monday.

Less than one month until Election Day, Trump was eager to project strength despite his illness. The still-infectious president surprised supporters who had gathered outside the hospital, driving by in a black SUV with the windows rolled up. Secret Service agents inside the vehicle could be seen in masks and other protective gear.

The move capped a weekend of contradictions that fueled confusion about Trump’s health, which has imperiled the leadership of the U.S. government and upended the final stages of the presidential campaign. While Trump’s physician offered a rosy prognosis on his condition, his briefings lacked basic information, including the findings of lung scans, or were quickly muddled by more serious assessments of the president’s health by other officials.

In a short video released by the White House on Sunday, Trump insisted he understood the gravity of the moment. But his actions moments later, by leaving the hospital and sitting inside the SUV with others, suggested otherwise.

“This is insanity,” Dr. James P. Phillips, an attending physician at Walter Reed who is a critic of Trump and his handling of the pandemic. “Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days. They might get sick. They may die.”

“For political theater,” the doctor added. “Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater.”

White House spokesman Judd Deere said Trump’s trip outside the hospital “was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.” He added that precautions were taken, including using personal protective equipment, to protect Trump as well as White House officials and Secret Service agents.

Joe Biden’s campaign, meanwhile, said the Democratic presidential nominee again tested negative for coronavirus Sunday. The results come five days after

Trump’s hospital ride criticized as irresponsible; could be released today

Oct. 5 (UPI) — President Donald Trump could be discharged from the hospital as soon as Monday, as criticism mounts over his brief ride outside to greet supporters.Trump made a surprise excursion Sunday evening outside Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., where was admitted Friday for treatment of COVID-19. He wore a cloth mask while sitting in the back seat of an SUV and waved at cheering supporters around the hospital. At least two people were seen in the car with him.

Doctors criticized the trip as careless and said it flagrantly flouted precautions designed to contain the coronavirus.

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days. They might get sick. They may die. For political theater,” Walter Reed attending physician Dr. James Phillips, who is also a doctor of emergency medicine at George Washington University, tweeted.

“Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater. This is insanity.”

“That presidential SUV is not only bulletproof, but hermetically sealed against chemical attack,” he wrote in another post. “The risk of COVID-19 transmission inside is as high as it gets outside of medical procedures. The irresponsibility is astounding.”

The Washington Post reported that current and former Secret Service officials criticized the drive, as well as Trump aides.

Trump announced his diagnosis early Friday and he was flown the hospital later that evening aboard Marine One. White House physician Dr. Sean Conley told reporters Sunday Trump has shown improvement.

The White House dismissed concerns about Trump’s motorcade drive outside the hospital, saying it had been cleared by medical staff.

“Appropriate precautions were taken in the execution of this movement to protect the president and all those supporting it, including PPE,” spokesman Judd Deere said. “The movement was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.”

Doctors said Sunday the president could be moved back to the White House as early as Monday. But Conley acknowledged the president’s oxygen levels had dropped twice since Friday and that he’d been treated with the powerful steroid dexamethasone, which is recommended only for COVID-19 patients who need oxygen, including those on ventilators.

Administering the drug risks a systemic inflammatory response that can lead to lung injury and multisystem organ dysfunction, the National Institutes of Health warns.

Trump also received two doses of the antiviral drug remdesivir that was authorized for emergency use in May for treating hospitalized patients with the coronavirus.

Some experts have voiced concern about a premature release.

“For someone sick enough to have required remdesivir and dexamethasone, I can’t think of a situation in which a patient would be okay to leave on day three, even with the White House’s medical capacity,” University of California, San Francisco professor Robert Wachter told The Washington Post.

Doctors say COVID-19 patients remain especially vulnerable to complications for as many as 10 days after their first symptoms — and sometimes deteriorate suddenly. Trump’s age and weight place him

NBC’s ‘Today’ Launches Fitness, Cooking Classes Via Streaming Video



Carson Daly, Craig Melvin, Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb, Al Roker sitting at a table


© NBC/NBCU Photo Bank


Click here to read the full article.

NBC’s “Today” has a new digital-video recipe for the cooking and wellness segments that are a staple of its morning schedule.

Between October 5 and 9, the program’s streaming-video counterpart, “Today All Day,” will host 30-minute “Get Moving With” fitness classes at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. During the week of October 12, the outlet will feature cooking classes that give viewers the chance to sign up for emails with ingredient shopping lists that will be delivered in advance iof the session. The “Get Cooking With” shows will stream at 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. eastern.

The “All Day” feed is available on NBC’s Peacock streaming-video hub as well as Today’s web site.

“This is a way to meet the demand we’re seeing from our audience for full-length programming and to experiment with appointment viewing to drive consistent and scheduled viewership,” says Ashley Parrish, vice president of strategic content and executive editor of Today Digital.

NBC News launched “Today All Day” in July in a bid to extend the flagship morning program to digital venues as younger consumers migrate to new streaming venues. The round-the-clock feed, which offers four six-hour blocks, contains segments from recent show archives as well as  original shows starring current “Today” hosts.

The classes will feature a range of instructors and experts. Fitness teachers will include celebrity trainer Isaac Boots and Olympic water polo player Ashleigh Johnson. Cooking teachers will include Nyesha Arrington of Bravo’s “Top Chef” and reality-TV personality Jessie James Decker, as well as “Today” mainstay Al Roker.

“In a time when the pandemic is making it difficult to take classes in-person, head to the gym or get together with friends for a meal, these classes offer a way for viewers to stay healthy and are a fun activity for friends and family to enjoy together virtually,” says Melissa Dunlop, senior producer for Today Digital.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Op-Ed: Trust and Tracing | MedPage Today

The fight against COVID-19 requires regaining and maintaining immigrants’ trust in our public health system. The Trump administration’s public charge rule, which empowers the U.S. government to deny green cards to immigrants who receive welfare benefits, could prove to be a public health problem by reducing immigrants’ willingness to engage in contract tracing and testing and trust leaders.

With 70% of immigrants in the labor force serving as essential workers, whether it be as healthcare providers or meatpacking plant workers, immigrants are at greater risk of being exposed to COVID-19. In fact, reports across the country show that migrant farmworker communities face not only higher COVID-19 exposure, but also more damaging effects from the current West Coast wildfires.

This news is concerning as immigrants are more likely to lack health insurance, with 23% of immigrants with legal status and 45% of undocumented immigrants lacking insurance, compared with 8% of citizens.

If this trend wasn’t bad enough, reports have shown that Trump’s public charge rule has made immigrants afraid to seek healthcare. The Kaiser Family Foundation has found that immigrants are disenrolling in healthcare benefit programs like Medicaid. A report from the Chicano Federation shows that this is not a theoretical issue as places like San Diego county struggle to convince community members to share personal information with contact tracers: it is an urgent one, with potentially catastrophic public health implications.

This lack of confidence is exactly why improving immigrants’ trust in the U.S. public health system is an issue of public concern. If immigrants distrust testing and contact tracing programs, there is an increased likelihood that COVID-19 will spread undetected in all communities — hampering states’ abilities to re-open their economies and contain the pandemic.

As individuals in the medical field and the children of immigrants, ensuring that immigrants trust COVID-19 testing and contact tracing programs is medically necessary and deeply personal. This understanding is why we have outlined some immediate policy steps to rebuild immigrants’ trust in public health systems during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • First, the public charge rule should be rescinded. This would ensure that immigrants are not afraid to use the many community clinics that serve people regardless of citizenship status or ability to pay. These clinics are often key resources for necessary testing that must take place. In addition, immigrants wouldn’t withdraw their children from important insurance programs, like the Children’s Health Insurance Program, that provide access to care for low-income children. Furthermore, removing green card penalties for obtaining necessary food and housing assistance programs will increase immigrants’ willingness to access testing and contact tracing programs
  • Second, the federal government should make good on its promise to cover testing fees for all citizens and residents. This is very important as those who lack insurance face exorbitant testing costs. Covering the costs of testing fees will make it more likely that immigrant communities are able to access tests
  • Third, on the state level, public health departments should work with community organizations to share information and emphasize the

Trump Wants to ‘Walk Out’ of Walter Reed Today, President’s Physicians Say He’s Doing ‘Very Well’

President Donald Trump’s physician Dr. Sean Conley said he is doing “very well” Saturday morning and all of his coughing and congestion conditions are steadily improving. Trump’s medical care team said the president has been fever-free for over 24 hours and that he’s in “good spirits.”



a man wearing a suit and tie: White House physician Sean Conley gives an update on the condition of US President Donald Trump, on October 3, 2020, at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. - Trump was hospitalized on October 2 due to a Covid-19 diagnosis.


© BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images/Getty
White House physician Sean Conley gives an update on the condition of US President Donald Trump, on October 3, 2020, at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. – Trump was hospitalized on October 2 due to a Covid-19 diagnosis.

Speaking outside of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Saturday morning, Dr. Conley said Trump’s vitals are normal, and that the president is not on oxygen and “there is no cause for concern” as of Saturday morning. Conley said Trump is not currently taking hydroxychloroquine but the two discussed taking the anti-malarial drug.

Loading...

Load Error

Dr. Sean Dooley, a pulmonary critical care physician on-hand for treatment, quipped that the president is ready to get all of the work done that White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows has prepared for him during his illness. Conley declined to say how or when exactly Trump became infected.

“I feel like I could walk out of here today,” the president said Saturday morning, according to Dooley, adding that Trump is getting around the hospital without any assistance. First lady Melania Trump did not require health care or treatment at Walter Reed.

“We are extremely happy with the progress the president has made,” Conley added, noting that all of his vitals and liver and kidney functions are performing normally.

In a Thursday statement, Conley confirmed both President Trump and the first lady tested positive for COVID-19. Trump initially experienced a low-grade fever, chills, nasal congestion and a cough before being sent to Walter Reed Medical Center for continued treatment Friday evening. Conley issued a memo Friday night saying Trump was doing “very well,” and ABC News reported Saturday morning that Trump was no longer experiencing shortness of breath.

World Reacts To Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Testing Positive For Coronavirus

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

A Morning Consult poll published Saturday found only 44 percent of Americans trust the president’s physician to truthfully report Trump’s true health condition.

Trump on Friday took a single dose of the experimental antibody Remdesivir through an IV at the “compassionate use” request of his physician, The Associated Press reported Saturday. Trump is said to only be experiencing mild symptoms including fatigue. The treatment is not authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Conley, a U.S. Navy officer, became the president’s official physician in May 2018, but it wasn’t until May 2020 that he was put in the national spotlight. Two months into the U.S. coronavirus pandemic, Trump announced he was taking hydroxychloroquine as a preventative measure against coronavirus at the direction of Conley.

“After numerous discussions he and I had regarding the evidence for and against the use of hydroxychloroquine, we concluded the potential

Dax Shepard’s Opioid Relapse | MedPage Today

Actor/comedian Dax Shepard has always been open about his past struggles with addiction and how he has been sober for the past 16 years. However, it was still surprising when, on the September 25th episode of his podcast Armchair Expert, Shepard revealed that he relapsed and has again been taking opioids.

About 6 months ago, Shepard broke his right hand, which required the temporary placement of a pin. Then in August, the avid motorcycle rider went over the handlebars of a bike during a race, breaking four ribs and shattering his shoulder. He again underwent surgery. Although he was prescribed hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin) for the pain, monitored by his wife, actress Kristen Bell, Dax began to “supplement” these pills with others that he purchased on his own.

As he told his podcast co-host, Monica Padman: “For the last 8 weeks maybe, I don’t really know … I’m on them all day … And I’m allowed to be on them at some dosage, because I have a prescription, and then I’m also augmenting that. And then all the prescriptions run out, and I’m now just taking 30 mil oxys that I’ve bought whenever I decide I can do [it].”

As he was still able to fulfill his daily responsibilities, including his twice-weekly podcast, he thought everything was under control. But then he started lying: “And I hate it, and I’m lying to other people. And I know I have to quit. But my tolerance is going up so quickly that I’m now in a situation where I’m taking, you know, eight 30s a day, and I know that’s an amount that’s going to result in a pretty bad withdrawal. And I start getting really scared, and I’m starting to feel really lonely. And I just have this enormous secret.”

Monica eventually called him out, and he came clean to her and Kristen. He immediately gave his pills to his wife and Monica to titrate down, began to go to AA meetings, and underwent withdrawal symptoms: “I’m sweating bullets; I’m jerky; my back kills. It’s terrible.”

Shepard went on to apologize to his friends, family, and his fans for deceiving them. He felt it was his responsibility to come forward and be honest about his struggles in the hope that others can also come forward and get the help they need.

Prescription Opioids

Prescription opioids can be used to treat moderate-to-severe pain and are often prescribed following surgery or injury, or for health conditions such as cancer.

In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the acceptance and use of prescription opioids for the treatment of chronic, non-cancer pain, such as back pain or osteoarthritis, despite serious risks and the lack of evidence about their long-term effectiveness.

According to the CDC:

  • More than 168 million opioid prescriptions were dispensed to American patients in 2018
  • There is a wide variation of opioid prescription rates across states; healthcare providers in the highest prescribing state, Alabama, wrote almost three times as many of these