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Don’t Overdo the Halloween Candy, or Your Smile May Suffer | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

SUNDAY, Oct. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) – – COVID-19 may change the look of Halloween this year, but dressing up and indulging in some sweets is all part of the fun, even if your kids can’t go door to door.

And experts say one night of eating candy won’t have a big effect on your teeth if it’s done in moderation.

“It is all about having self-control or parental control,” said Dr. Gregory Olson, chair of pediatric dentistry at the University of Texas Health School of Dentistry.

“Having a piece of candy here and there won’t do too much damage to a healthy mouth, but the type of candy you pick, how many you eat, how long it lasts, and how you care for your teeth afterward could make all the difference,” Olson said in a school news release.

The worst candies for teeth are hard or chewy candies like gummy worms and taffy, Olson said. That’s because they’re in your mouth longer and can stick to your teeth, causing harm if not washed out.

“Sour candy adds another level of harm to gummies because they are both sticky and acidic. Although it’s extra-tasty, eating a lot of this candy can cause tooth enamel to break down or weaken, leading to cavities,” Olson said.

It might be best to pick up chocolate, the darker the better. Chocolate is the best candy for your teeth, Olson said. “It melts in your mouth pretty quickly, meaning it won’t stick around as long to cause cavities.”

To retain your smile, Olson suggests the following:

  • Brush your teeth, at least two times a day.
  • Floss at least once a day – – more often if food is stuck between the teeth.
  • Watch children as they brush their teeth to ensure they are brushing thoroughly.
  • Schedule visits to the dentist.
  • Limit sweets.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight: association

By Cecile Mantovani



a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: FILE PHOTO: A nurse wearing protective gear is seen inside a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sampling room of the Synlab laboratory, at El Dorado airport in Bogota


© Reuters/LUISA GONZALEZ
FILE PHOTO: A nurse wearing protective gear is seen inside a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sampling room of the Synlab laboratory, at El Dorado airport in Bogota

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight: association

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The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey. 

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

(Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood)

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Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight – association

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

FILE PHOTO: A nurse wearing protective gear is seen inside a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sampling room of the Synlab laboratory, at El Dorado airport in Bogota, Colombia September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez/File Photo

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey.

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood

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Nurses suffer burn-out, psychological distress in COVID fight

By Cecile Mantovani

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey.

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

(Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood)

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Nurses Suffer Burn-Out, Psychological Distress in COVID Fight: Association | World News

GENEVA (Reuters) – Many nurses caring for COVID-19 patients are suffering burn-out or psychological distress, and many have faced abuse or discrimination outside of work, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) said.

Supplies of personal protective equipment for nurses and other health workers in some care homes remain insufficient, it said, marking World Mental Health Day on Saturday.

“We are extremely concerned about the mental health impact on nurses,” Howard Catton, a British nurse who is the ICN’s chief executive, told Reuters Television at the association’s headquarters in Geneva.

“Our most recent survey of national nurses’ associations shows that more than 70% of them (the associations) were saying that nurses have been subject to violence or discrimination and as a result of that they are very concerned about extreme cases of psychological distress and mental health pressure,” he said.

The figure was based on responses from roughly a quarter of its national nurses’ associations in more than 130 countries.

Nurses face a broad spectrum of issues that affect their mental health, including physical and verbal abuse, Catton said.

“There are nurses who have been subject to discrimination, where their landlord has not renewed their lease for their apartment, or they can’t get child care for their children,” he said, without giving specifics of physical or verbal abuse.

ICN has lobbied for better protection and working conditions for nurses on the front lines of the pandemic.

“We still continue to see problems with the supplies personal protective equipment. There have been improvements, particularly in hospitals,” Catton said.

But some care homes and long-term care facilities in Europe, and in North and South America still lack supplies, he said, citing its members’ survey.

The World Health Organization said last Monday that services for mentally ill and substance abuse patients have been disrupted worldwide during the pandemic, and COVID-19 is expected to cause further distress for many.

(Reporting by Cecile Mantovani; writing by Stephanie Nebehay and editing by Giles Elgood)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Care home workers suffer Covid trauma, anxiety: study

Nearly half of care home workers in northern Italy may be suffering from post-traumatic stress or anxiety following the first wave of the pandemic, new research showed Wednesday. 

As Covid-19 began its spread throughout Europe, northern regions of Italy — home to a high proportion of elderly people — were at the frontline as intensive care units were inundated with patients.

While much attention was focused on the physical health of first responders and doctors, far less study has been given over to the mental well-being of the nurses, cleaners and caterers at care homes.

Researchers in Italy and Britain conducted an anonymous survey of more than 1,000 care home workers to check their levels of stress and anxiety after months of caring for sick residents.

They found that 43 percent of respondents passed the symptom threshold for anxiety and PTSD.

“Due to the severity of the situation, we were expecting a reasonably high prevalence, but not as high as we found,” Elena Rusconi, from the University of Trento’s Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science, told AFP.

– Overlooked –

Authors of the research, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, said care home workers had faced exceptionally testing conditions during the first wave.

Unlike emergency health staff, care home workers often form tight bonds with residents, making it all the more emotionally taxing when one gets ill or dies. 

In addition, they had to manage communication with families who were unable to see their loved ones because of the virus.

The workers frequently lacked sufficient personal protective equipment and materiel for hygiene and safety protocols. 

Rusconi said the research showed how governments and society at large often overlook care home workers, especially in times of crisis.  

She said that care work required skill and dedication, yet often went underappreciated.

“They deal with a part of society that we don’t want to think too much about, perhaps from a sense of guilt,” Rusconi said. 

Noting that “many (not all) care home staff in Italy come from abroad,” she added: “Although they may have resided in Italy for a long period and have citizenship, they originally came to take on a job that is, perhaps, considered undesirable and is certainly less esteemed compared to that of hospital doctors and nurses.”

As Europe braces for a resurgence of cases, the authors called for an “urgent in-depth assessment of the psychological status” of all care home workers.

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