Showing: 1 - 4 of 4 RESULTS

Kids struggle with Covid-19 and its months of aftermath

She is a Covid-19 long hauler, along with her sister Audrey and mother Jamie.

One of her friends came home in March after spending two years in Wuhan, China. That may have been the source of the virus that would cut across the whole Richmond family and leave them with six months — and counting — of fatigue, pain and uncertainty in its wake.

Jamie Richmond has tallied $6,000 in medical bills for two girls who were healthy until March.

Both girls now have a host of problems, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, which causes a person’s heart rate to shoot up upon standing and lead to dizziness or fainting.

“It’s been horrific to go through this for so long,” Richmond said.

1 in 10 US cases are children

More than 657,000 children and teens across the United States had tested positive for the virus as of October 1, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association.

That figure is just over 10% of the more than 7 million US coronavirus cases so far, but it’s likely underreported because it relied on state data that is inconsistently collected.

Researchers looking into the long-term effects of Covid-19 are taking notice about how long-haul symptoms are affecting children.

I can't shake Covid-19: Warnings from young survivors still suffering

These researchers include a team at DePaul University in Chicago, who have launched two separate surveys, one for adults and the other for children, to help capture data on how patients are faring longer term after being diagnosed with Covid-19.

Long-haul children may be the most important cohort to research for a couple reasons, according to Leonard Jason, a professor of psychology at DePaul and director of the Center for Community Research, who leads that study.

“Kids are often more defenseless and don’t have the age, maturity or resources to stick up for themselves,” he said. “And kids are less complex in a lot of ways, so there are fewer extraneous factors.”

He has spent much of his career studying post-viral symptoms across a range of diseases and trying to extract lessons from the aftermath of past epidemics.

How to recognize Covid-19 symptoms in children, based on pediatricians' advice

“If you look at all the pandemics from the Spanish flu on down, a certain number of people never get better,” he said. “At least 10% six months later seem to still be having symptoms. With Covid-19, I think the rates could be very much higher.”

His team just completed a four-year study seeking to determine how many college students who contract mononucleosis ultimately develop chronic fatigue syndrome. He sees many of the same concerns with longer-term illnesses children with Covid-19 might develop.

“I fear that a lot of the people will fall through the cracks,” he said.

Maggie Frentheway got sick at the end of March. She later tested positive for coronavirus antibodies, but she still experiences crushing fatigue among other symptoms.

Concerns about gaslighting

The Richmond family in Boise does feel it’s falling through the cracks, despite the parents’ income and ability to take their kids to specialists for issues that have popped up, including vision loss and Sjogren’s syndrome.

“We are incredibly privileged,” Jamie Richmond said. “We are White and upper middle class. We

Halfway house residents struggle to buy food, medicine after facility issues run of bad checks | Premium

Residents of a private halfway house in Colorado Springs say they struggled for weeks to access personal funds for food, medication and other necessities while their halfway house-issued checks were rejected by banks and check-cashing services.

The snag at Community Alternatives of El Paso persisted despite administrators’ promises to fix the problem and held up money that belongs to residents, who are required to hand over their paychecks and other income as a condition of their incarceration. The halfway house takes out money for rent and restitution and issues residents periodic allowances.

Remaining funds in the residents’ accounts are returned, minus any rent and restitution, after their release.  

Starting in late August, CAE’s bank, Community Banks of Colorado, repeatedly refused to honor the allowance checks, but not before some residents believed they had successfully deposited them.

The resulting confusion caused some residents to overdraw their personal checking accounts, deepening their financial woes as they prepared for release, several residents told The Gazette. Others were turned away from check-cashing services, forcing them to borrow money from family members and friends to cover their expenses.


Colorado Watch | Colorado halfway houses: Violence, sex and drugs as promised reforms lag

Although food is provided at CAE, many residents leave on work release and eat outside the facility, and others avoid the food that’s served, which comes from the El Paso County jail.

For Robert Thompson, the issue was the latest hurdle to obtaining a critical seizure medication while incarcerated at CAE.

After being transferred to CAE from the El Paso County jail in July, Thompson said he went two days without his daily medication. When administrators took him to an urgent care center after his repeated complaints, a provider there prescribed him half of his normal dose of 1,000 mg twice daily.

Thompson attributes his struggle over medications for contributing to seizures while in CAE custody that led to two trips by ambulance to UCHealth Memorial Hospital Central, where doctors restored his normal prescription and said his seizures could cause brain damage and even death.   

“They are endangering my life,” said Thompson, 59, who estimated that up to a third of the population — about 170 people as of August — struggled to access their money.

Thompson provided receipts from Walmart and King Soopers showing that his CAE checks were rejected by check-cashing services at a time he said he needed to refill his prescription. He eventually received a new check from CAE and purchased a refill two days before running out.

He said Walmart and King Soopers had so many problems with checks from CAE that they stopped accepting them.

In a memo posted Sept. 23 at CAE, and obtained by the newspaper, administrators instructed inmates not to cash checks issued between Aug. 20-Sept. 22, citing a “system error at the bank.”  

Two other residents said they had checks returned prior to that period, and receipts examined by the newspaper showed problems continued afterward.


Coronavirus outbreak at Colorado Springs halfway house widens,

Depressed teens may struggle in school

By about age 16, teens diagnosed with depression have substantially lower educational attainment, a new British study finds.

Targeted educational support might be of particular benefit to teens from poor backgrounds and boys, but all children with depression can benefit from such help, the study authors suggested.

For the study, the researchers used British health and education records to identify nearly 1,500 kids under 18 years of age with depression. Typically, their depression was diagnosed around age 15. Their educational attainment was compared with a group of young people who were not depressed.

Among students with a diagnosis of depression, 83% reached expected educational attainment at ages 6 to 7, but only 45% hit more advanced thresholds in English and math by age 15 to 16. Researchers said that’s much lower than the 53% who met the threshold locally and nationwide.

“Previous research has found that, in general, depression in childhood is linked to lower school performance,” said researcher Alice Wickersham, a doctoral student at NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre of King’s College London.

But young people who developed depression in secondary school typically showed a performance decline on the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exams. The exams — taken by most pupils at about age 15 to 16 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland — dovetailed with the time of diagnosis for many young people.

The pattern appeared to be consistent across different genders, ethnicities and economic groups, Wickersham said in a research center news release.

“While it’s important to emphasize that this won’t be the case for all teenagers with depression, it does mean that many may find themselves at a disadvantage for this pivotal educational milestone,” Wickersham said.

“It highlights the need to pay close attention to teenagers who are showing early signs of depression. For example, by offering them extra educational support in the lead up to their GCSEs, and working with them to develop a plan for completing their compulsory education,” she added.

Researcher Dr. Johnny Downs, senior lecturer in child and adolescent psychiatry at King’s College London, said the findings have two key policy implications.

“It demonstrates just how powerful depression can be in reducing young people’s chances at fulfilling their potential, and provides a strong justification for how mental health and educational services need to work to detect and support young people prior to critical academic milestones,” he said.

The findings were published online Oct. 8 in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

More information

For more about teens and depression, head to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source Article

‘Long Covid’ sufferers struggle to return to work

From migraines to fatigue, coronavirus patients say they are continuing to suffer debilitating symptoms months after first becoming infected, in what has become known as “long Covid.” 



a person standing in front of a window


© Provided by CNBC


Claire Twomey, 33, a social worker in County Meath, Ireland, told CNBC via telephone that it was in her first week back at work, around six weeks after she first became ill with the coronavirus, that her symptoms re-emerged. 

She initially thought she had become re-infected with the virus when the headaches came back, followed by a fever, coughing and shortness of breath. But hospital tests found no underlying issues, she said. 

Twomey said she felt “absolutely floored” when the symptoms re-emerged. “I was back in bed, I couldn’t even read a book or watch TV for longer than half an hour.” 

More “insane, weird (and) strange” symptoms appeared in this relapse with the illness, including gastrointestinal issues, hair loss and skin rashes.

Twomey said she felt “frustrated” as the illness lingered, and worried about the future after being out of work for so long. “I’ve been on pause for six months,” she said. 

By mid-September, Twomey found she was having fewer “bad days” but knew that she still couldn’t return to working as she had before. 

Twomey applied for another part-time position in social care, but spent the eight days prior to the job interview bedridden with migraines. “I thought I was going to have to cancel the interview.” 

Fortunately, she was able to do the interview and got the job, which she is set to start in a few weeks. 



a close up of a woman: Claire Twomey, 33, a social worker from Ireland has suffered with


© Provided by CNBC
Claire Twomey, 33, a social worker from Ireland has suffered with

‘A bigger public health problem’

Three health care bodies in the U.K. announced Monday that they were working on a formal definition of “long Covid” and how to identify symptoms, so that the National Health Service can officially recognize the illness. The “long Covid” guidelines are expected to be published by the end of the year. 

In a paper published Monday by the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change on “long Covid,” Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, warned so-called “long haulers … could turn out to be a bigger public-health problem than excess deaths from Covid-19.” 

The paper also highlighted new findings from the Covid Symptom Study, led by Spector, indicating that around 10% of people surveyed in the U.K. had suffered with “long Covid” symptoms for a month, while up to 2% were still experiencing them after three months. 

With nearly 4.3 million downloading the study’s app to record coronavirus symptoms, it is said to be the largest public science project of its kind in the world. There have been 532,779 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in the U.K. and 42,535 related deaths, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University.  

Based on extrapolated data, the researchers estimated that of those affected by the first wave of the virus in the U.K., 300,000 people would