Showing: 1 - 2 of 2 RESULTS

Capital Health Earns National Recognition for Excellence in Stroke Care

Capital Health Earns National Recognition for Excellence in Stroke Care

PR Newswire

TRENTON, N.J., Oct. 9, 2020

Capital Health Regional Medical Center (RMC) has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Award

TRENTON, N.J., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Capital Health Regional Medical Center (RMC) has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Award. This award recognizes the hospital’s commitment and success in ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

“When the residents of our community need the most advanced stroke care in the region, they look to Capital Health,” said Al Maghazehe, president and CEO of Capital Health. “Over the last decade, we have made an unparalleled commitment to providing high level stroke care. Our recognition through the American Heart Association’s Get with the Guidelines-Stroke initiative at RMC demonstrates that we never stop working to improve the high quality of care we offer our stroke patients.”

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of adult disability. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds and more than 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

Capital Health Regional Medical Center earned the Get With The Guidelines® Stroke Gold Plus Award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients should also receive education on managing their health, get a follow-up visit scheduled, as well as other care transition interventions

Additionally, RMC received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Target: StrokeSM Honor Roll Elite award. To qualify for this recognition, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke.

Capital Health Regional Medical Center, located in Trenton, New Jersey, is the only Comprehensive Stroke Center in the region certified by The Joint Commission, and one of only nine such hospitals in New Jersey. As part of Capital Health’s Capital Institute for Neurosciences, it is available for patients who require the most advanced treatments for neurovascular and stroke care including neuroendovascular, neurosurgical and stroke services. In addition, Capital Health launched its innovative Mobile Stroke Unit in early 2017, designed to bring time-critical stroke care to patients at their home, or wherever it is dispatched to assess them. When it first went into service, Capital Health’s Mobile Stroke Unit

Arm squeezes with blood pressure cuffs may help stroke recovery

After administering clot-busting drugs to treat a stroke, using blood pressure cuffs to squeeze each arm might aid recovery, a new, small Chinese study suggests.

In the technique — called remote ischemic post-conditioning — the flow of oxygen-rich blood is repeatedly interrupted and restored using blood pressure cuffs on the arms. Earlier studies have found that the technique may prevent tissue damage by helping the body handle changes in blood flow and the damage that may occur from a stroke, researchers say.

“The findings show a promising future prospect of remote ischemic post-conditioning and have important clinical implications,” said researcher Dr. Guo-liang Li, of First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an and Jiaotong University in Xi’an, China.

“As we all know, the therapy has a lot of advantages,” he said, calling it noninvasive, easy-to-use, cost-effective and safe.

Even though clot-busting drugs have saved many stroke patients, 32% do not have a favorable outcome. This is partly because blood flow is not completely restored and vessels can clot even after clot-busting drugs are given, Li said.

“Remote ischemic post-conditioning can be a complementary treatment that can improve the prognosis in stroke patients,” he said.

This study was done in China, but Li said the technique has also been studied in the United Kingdom, France and Denmark.

For the study, Li’s team randomly assigned 68 people (average age: 65) who suffered a stroke. All were treated within 4.5 hours with a medication that dissolves blood clots called tPA. Half also received ischemic post-conditioning therapy.

Over an average of 11 days, post-conditioning participants wore blood pressure cuffs on both arms for 40 minutes, alternating cycles of inflation for five minutes and deflation for three minutes. Treatments were done twice a day.

Stroke recovery was gauged on a scale of no symptoms no significant disability despite some symptoms or slight disability. People who had no symptoms after three months were considered to have had a favorable recovery.

Seventy-two percent of those who wore the blood pressure cuff had a favorable recovery, compared with 50% of those who didn’t, the researchers found. These findings remained significant even after taking into account age, stroke severity and other factors.

During the trial, two people dropped out — one because the cuffs caused skin redness and the other because the pressure applied during the procedure was uncomfortable. Researchers don’t know how long the treatment is needed to be most effective.

They caution that ischemic post-conditioning is still experimental and isn’t something that should be tried on recovering stroke patients at home.

“In the future, more studies are needed to confirm that the combined therapy of clot-busting drugs and remote ischemic post-conditioning is safe and effective in much larger groups of people before this experimental therapy can be performed at home,” Li said.

Dr. Larry Goldstein, chairman of the Department of Neurology at the University of Kentucky, reviewed the findings.

“This single hospital study was aimed at determining whether the technique might be helpful in improving outcomes of patients with stroke