Showing: 1 - 3 of 3 RESULTS

I Lost 2 Stone with the Help of My Fitbit and a Calorie Deficit

To prevent herself from spiralling when she was furloughed, Shar Reid, 30, a trainee solicitor from Doncaster, focused her attention on her mental and physical wellbeing.


Earlier in 2020, I had just moved to Doncaster to start a new role as part of my training to be a solicitor. I had only been there a few days when I was sent home – I have asthma, (very mild) but it still means I was in the ‘at-risk’ category for Covid. About a week later, I was furloughed.

I was absolutely devastated – I cried a lot those first few weeks. I’d worked so hard for this training contract, going to law school part time for two years. Now I was so scared there was going to be no work for me after furlough. I felt like my life was falling apart.

To make matters worse, I was on my own. I sat and watched Netflix all day, wallowing and feeling sorry for myself. I wasn’t sleeping well, and I was eating crap and feeling pretty crap. I knew I was spiralling – and I had to do something to pull myself out of it.

Taking control

Before lockdown, I had been exercising regularly at the gym, doing a lot of weightlifting and making good progress. It was the thought of losing all that hard work that gave me the kick I needed to do something. There was so much in my life beyond my control – my job, Covid – but one of the few things I did have power over was my own health and wellbeing.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

I had a Fitbit Charge tracker, but hadn’t paid too much attention to the numbers on their before then. But in lockdown those numbers became my guide – I made it my goal to get in a workout, and at least 10,000 steps a day.

While I’ve always been a meal planner and relatively healthy eater, it was all the snacking in lockdown that really got me. I also got into baking – which can be problematic, if you’re the only one around to eat what you make! But I wanted to lose some weight and I knew that in order to do that, I had to be burning more calories than I was eating.

Fitbit Charge 4

Fitbit
johnlewis.com

£129.00

I started keeping track of my meals with the MyFitnessPal app, making sure my daily total calories in were slightly under the total calorie burn on my Fitbit every day to stay in that calorie deficit. To help prevent myself from snacking too much, I tried intermittent fasting, keeping my eating window between 12pm and 8pm, which really prevented me from falling back into the habit of late night snacking I’d developed.

Sill, I tried not to get too fixated on

‘I Got Healthy, Didn’t Starve Myself I Lost 5.5 Stone in a Year

My name is Jenny Chatelain (@jenniie_fit), and I’m 29 years old. I’m from Haiti and was raised in Canada, and I currently work as a respiratory therapist. I lost 78 pounds by staying in a calorie deficit and slowly increasing my weight lifting workouts over the course of a year.



a couple of people posing for the camera: With a calorie deficit and slowly increasing her weight lifting and HIIT workouts from 2 to 5 days a week, Jenny Chatelain lost almost 6 stone in one year.


© Provided by Women’s Health UK
With a calorie deficit and slowly increasing her weight lifting and HIIT workouts from 2 to 5 days a week, Jenny Chatelain lost almost 6 stone in one year.

When it comes to losing weight, my biggest struggle has always been my love of food. It’s so convenient to go out to eat, and I’ve loved eating my whole life. At my heaviest, I weighed 242 pounds.

When I first started my weight-loss journey, I thought I had to give up all my favorite foods and *always* eat healthy foods. I kept telling myself that it was too hard, and I wasn’t sure if I could do it. But my motivation was my health. When I was overweight, I was out of breath simply from taking the stairs. I was always tired. I couldn’t find my size in clothes I liked. I lacked self-esteem.

My turning point came when I was on the bus on my way to school. A lady who was seated asked me if I needed her seat for the baby. She thought I was pregnant.

I was so embarrassed because I wasn’t – I was just overweight. This event made me sad enough to tell myself I couldn’t stay like that. I had already thought about losing weight, but I had not taken any real action. Thinking about it is not enough – I had to put in the work, stay focused and be consistent.

I chose to start by focusing on the amount of calories I was consuming per day. I learned that all I really needed to do to lose fat was to be in a caloric deficit (eating fewer calories than your body burns). I eat protein at each meal, and eat a lot of fruit and veggies. I was able to include some of my favorite foods and treats while staying in a caloric deficit and learning how to control my portions.

I’ve never starved or punished myself. This new diet became my lifestyle. I came to the realisation that I was struggling to lose weight because I lacked the knowledge of what to really do. Now, I know I can lose fat and still eat ice cream in moderation. This method is the best for me because it’s sustainable.

What I typically eat in a day

  • Breakfast: Two full eggs and one egg white omelet with a lot of veggies. Fruits on the side.
  • Lunch: Ground turkey, avocado, broccoli.
  • Snacks: Carrots, cucumbers, almonds or a bowl of oats. I make my oats with water or oat milk and add a banana and chia seeds.
  • Dinner: Grilled salmon, sweet potatoes and green peas.
  • Dessert: Plain

Physician Prescribes a Life in Medicine; Marvin J. Stone, MD, MACP, FRCP writes book to inspire the next generation of doctors

The future of medicine is exciting. Marvin J. Stone, MD, MACP, FRCP, draws from a lifetime of practicing medicine with a passion to inspire and convey to anyone interested in a medical career the excitement and fascination intrinsic to becoming and serving as a physician in his book “When to Act and When to Refrain: A Lifetime of Learning the Science and Art of Medicine” (Revised and Updated, 2020). He invites students, young doctors, experienced physicians, and lay persons with interest in medical science and health care to an eye-opening look inside his journey through the last half-century in medicine: becoming a physician, acquiring intense training in patient care and research, and teaching at all levels.

DALLAS, Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — “Martin Stone is a classical triple-threat medical academic: accomplished in biomedical research, expert in his clinical field, and revered teacher. He has written a book of immense value.”
Jeremiah A. Barondess, MD, William T. Foley Distinguished Professor in Clinical Medicine, Weill-Cornell Medical College

“No other profession is like medicine. The future of medicine is exciting,” says Marvin J. Stone, MD, MACP, FRCP of Dallas, Texas, chief emeritus, hematology and oncology at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, a professor of internal medicine at Texas A&M College of Medicine and clinical professor of humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas. Advances in medical science are developing in dizzying speed. Despite the myriad challenges facing students and new doctors, it is reassuring to note that the number of applicants for medical schools in the United States remains high.

With the release of his book “When to Act and When to Refrain: A Lifetime of Learning the Science and Art of Medicine” (Revised and Updated, 2020). Dr. Stone draws from a lifetime of practicing medicine with a passion to inspire and convey to anyone interested in a medical career the excitement and fascination intrinsic to becoming and serving as a physician. He invites students, young doctors, experienced physicians, and lay persons with interest in medical science and health care to an eye-opening look inside his journey through the last half-century in medicine: becoming a physician, acquiring intense training in patient care and research, and teaching at all levels.

A warm and engaging autobiography, Stone says, “Looking back over my career, I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to teach, do research, and care for patients while continuing to learn the science and art of medicine. To see your students excel, to perform an experiment that yields new scientific knowledge, and especially to help some seriously ill patients recover so they can see their children and grandchildren grow up––what more could one ask?”

As we turn towards the future and our goals for 2050, he emphasizes the importance of maintaining core values. He says, “We must always bear in mind the three pillars of medicine: Competence, Caring, and Compassion. Further adding, “These core values in medicine and science are crucial to fulfilling our goals: to