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Radford woman started career as dentist, but now spends time creating art

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) – Teresa Regil is an artist who discovered her passion for painting almost by accident after years of being a dentist.



a painting of a man and a woman posing for a photo: She said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.


© Janay Reece
She said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“In 2009 I tried to do something to relax and I started drawing and I said “Oh.” I did a portrait of my mom in watercolor and watercolor is so difficult and she looked like my mom. And oh, maybe I can start doing this,” said Regil.

She had a long career as a pediatric dentist for children with special needs in Maryland.

“To me it was just a continuum from dentistry to painting to art,” said Regil.

Regil said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“I think that had a lot to do with my painting and what I use. I am ambidextrous. Sometimes my right hand – when I was doing root canals and things like that, I’d use my left hand too—the same with painting,” said Regil.

Many of Regil’s paintings are of her family. She’s an abuela or grandmother to many of theses faces.

“They are my life. They are my oxygen,”said Regil.

The museum’s director says Regil is a good example of a local artist who simply wants to share her art. Regil is self-taught, guided by masters such as John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. She creates her portraits in oil and incorporates a myriad of techniques, including alla prima, indirect approach and mixed media. Often her backgrounds are made with acrylics and the main subject or figure with oil.

“She is not a professional artist, she is self-trained, but she is out there doing her art and wanting her art to be out there for people to see.”

“Some days I say, ‘Why am I painting?’ Cause I have to. I just have to,” said Regil.

Regil is donating one of her paintings for a silent auction to help benefit the Glencoe Museum. The painting is a master copy of a work by her artistic inspiration John Singer Sargent. The piece will be open for bidding until December 4.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

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A Radford woman started her career as a dentist, but now spends time creating art

RADFORD, Va. (WDBJ) – Teresa Regil is an artist who discovered her passion for painting almost by accident after years of being a dentist.



a painting of a man and a woman posing for a photo: She says doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.


© Janay Reece
She says doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“In 2009 I tried to do something to relax and I started drawing and I said “Oh” I did a portrait of my mom in watercolor and watercolor is so difficult and she looked like my mom. And oh, maybe I can start doing this,” said Teresa Regil.

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Ahe had a long career as a pediatric dentist for children with special needs in Maryland.

“To me it was just a continuum from dentistry to painting to art,” said Regil.

Regil said she doesn’t see a difference between dentistry and art because either way she’s using her hands.

“I think that had a lot to do with my painting and what I use. I am ambidextrous. Sometimes my right hand – when I was doing root canals and things like that, I’d use my left hand too—the same with painting,” said said Regil.

Many of Regil’s paintings are of her family. She’s an abuela or grandmother to many of theses faces.

“They are my life. They are my oxygen,”said  Regil.

The museum’s director says Regil is a good example of a local artist who simply wants to share her art. Regil is self-taught, guided by masters such as John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. She creates her portraits in oil and incorporates a myriad of techniques, including alla prima, indirect approach, and mixed media. Often her backgrounds are made with acrylics and the main subject or figure with oil.

“She is not a professional artist she is self-trained, but she is out there doing her art and wanting her art to be out there for people to see.”

“Some days I say, ‘Why am I painting?’ Cause I have too. I just have too,” said Regil.

Rigil is donating one of her paintings for a silent auction to help benefit the Glencoe Museum. The painting a master copy of a work by her artistic inspiration John Singer Sargent. The piece will be open for bidding until December 4th.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

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Trump’s fight with COVID-19 adds fresh fuel to the misinformation fire he started

With the president hospitalized, his doctors evading basic questions and an election 29 days away, chaos reigned after Trump tested positive for the virus that’s killed more than 200,000 Americans. Now, after a four-day stay at Walter Reed medical center, the president said he will return to the White House. But more questions than answers remain.

Unlike a normal residence, the White House has its own medical unit, offering “full-time” care and facilities for emergency surgery, including the ability to administer supplemental oxygen — which he previously received at the White House — and even a crash cart for resuscitation.

If the president leaves the hospital Monday evening, the situation could become even more opaque. Trump is eager to return to an image of normalcy, but he’s still a high-risk patient in the throes of a wildly unpredictable and deadly virus that seldom charts a linear course to recovery. And because it’s clear that Trump is eager to feign normalcy at any cost with less than a month to go before the election, his return to the White House is not a reliable sign that he’s anywhere near being in the clear.

One result of obfuscating the president’s health? The internet is left to eagerly fill in the gaps.

Top-down misinformation

Doctors provided the first update about the status of Trump’s health on Saturday, but that event backfired, with White House Physician Dr. Sean Conley later admitting that he omitted information in order to keep the president’s spirits high. Conley also threw the timeline of Trump’s diagnosis into question — confusion that’s only been partially resolved since.

The White House’s coronavirus outbreak is a big opening for opportunists, according to Yonder, an AI company that monitors online conversations and tracks disinformation. In an online info ecosystem the company says is “broken,” a fresh crisis is rocket fuel for false claims and conspiracies.

“From groups suggesting the diagnosis was a hoax for political gain to QAnon supporters suggesting it was all part of a plan to isolate and protect the President from his adversaries in the ‘deep state,’ social media continues to act as a weaponized rumor mill,” Yonder CEO Jonathon Morgan said.

“In every case, agenda-driven groups on social media are using another national crisis to their advantage, and obscuring the truth in the process.”

On Friday, left-leaning conspiracy theories like #TrumpCovidHoax posited that the

Trump Started on Dexamethasone, Has ‘Expected’ Lung Findings

President Trump was administered dexamethasone therapy for COVID-19 treatment, and had two episodes of low oxygen saturation levels that required supplemental oxygen, said doctors at Walter Reed Medical Center at a press conference on Sunday.

“In response to transient low oxygen levels, we did initiate dexamethasone therapy [and] our plan is to continue that for the time being,” said Brian Garibaldi, MD, of Johns Hopkins University. He also confirmed the president received his second dose of remdesivir.

White House physician Sean Conley, DO, said the team “debated on whether or not to start” dexamethasone, but added, “the potential benefits probably outweighed any risk at this time.”

Dexamethasone is a low-cost steroid that has shown the most benefit for the sickest patients with COVID-19. According to the U.K.’s RECOVERY trial, incidence of mortality was significantly lower for patients receiving mechanical ventilation, and those receiving supplemental oxygen without mechanical ventilation, but there was no significant benefit for those not receiving respiratory support.

The NIH currently recommends dexamethasone for hospitalized patients with “severe COVID-19.”

Doctors also said the president was receiving X-rays and CT scans. When asked by reporters if there were signs of pneumonia, lung involvement or damage to the lungs, Conley said there were some, “expected findings, but nothing of any clinical concern.”

Conley confirmed that President Trump’s oxygen levels dropped to 93%, that he did receive supplemental oxygen on Friday “for about an hour,” though he continued to stress “it wasn’t in the low 80s or anything like that.”

When pressed about the two incidences of a drop in oxygen levels, Conley said he would have to “check with the nursing staff” about the second round of supplemental oxygen.

“If he did [receive it], it was very limited,” he said.

After he was asked if the president’s oxygen levels ever dipped below 90%, Conley responded, “we don’t have any records here of that.” He described President Trump’s current oxygen levels at 98%.

Conley also confirmed the president had “a momentary episode of high fever and temporary drop in [oxygen] saturation” on Friday, which prompted the medical team to move him to Walter Reed.

Garibaldi said the president’s liver and kidney function remain normal. Conley said that like every patient, lung spirometry was performed on President Trump and it was “over 2,500 ml each time.”

When asked if the president is being treated in a negative pressure room, Conley maintained he was “not going to get into specifics” of care.

The hope is for President Trump to be discharged to the White House as early as tomorrow where he can continue his treatment course, Garibaldi noted.

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    Molly Walker is an associate editor, who covers infectious diseases for MedPage Today. She has a passion for evidence, data and public health. Follow

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