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Prime Day Golf, Fitness & Sports Deals 2020: Early Treadmill, Exercise Bike, Nike & Adidas Apparel, Golf & Gym Equipment Sales Identified by Save Bubble

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Amazon Prime Day 2020 researchers at Save Bubble have shared the latest early sports and fitness deals for Amazon Prime Day 2020, featuring deals on golf apparel and equipment, stationary bikes, treadmills, ellipticals, running shoes, sportswear and more. Check out the full range of deals in the list below.

Best golf deals:

Best sport & fitness products deals:

Best exercise bike & treadmill deals:

Best Nike & Adidas sports gear:

Want some more Adidas, Nike, and more fitness gear deals? Click here to shop the entire selection of deals on the Amazon Prime Day page.

Amazon Prime Day 2020 discounts last for a certain length of time. Save Bubble earns commissions from purchases made using the links provided.

Prime Day gives shoppers an exciting opportunity to take advantage of a huge number of deals across Amazon’s broad range of products.

Not yet an Amazon Prime member? Start your 30-day free trial now and unlock all the best Prime Day deals.

Prime Day gives shoppers an excellent opportunity to save on golf and sports equipment, fitness and exercise machines, and gym clothing and footwear. As a hobby, golf requires numerous specialty equipment such as golf club drivers and iron sets. Complete golf club sets from Strata, Pinemeadow, and PreciseGolf are available in sizes for men, women, and children. Golf balls from Titleist, Callaway, and TaylorMade, as well as various training equipment such as putting greens and golf chipping nets can allow enthusiasts to practice their swings and putts at home.

Fitness equipment such as exercise bikes and treadmills are also highly popular on Amazon. Schwinn exercise bikes and Marcy recumbent bikes are some of the top-selling exercise equipment, along with under-desk pedal exercisers from DeskCycle, which allow indoor cycling even while you’re working. NordicTrack and Sunny Health & Fitness treadmills are highly rated and come in folding variants for easier storage.

Sports footwear and fitness clothing are necessary for enhanced freedom of movement while working out. adidas, Nike, Under Armour, Reebok, and similar active wear brands all have extensive lines of running shoes, activewear apparel, and more.

This year’s Prime Day sale taking place later in the year marks a first in Prime Day history.

Want some more sports and fitness deals? Click here to browse the full selection of deals on the Amazon Prime Day sale page.

About Save Bubble: Save Bubble round-up the latest online sales news. As an Amazon Associate Save Bubble earns from qualifying purchases.

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SPORTS MEDICINE: Vitamin D more vital than ever | John Doherty

The best opportunity for preventive care, according to Wojtys, occurs in the teenage years, decades before diagnosis. “Peak bone mass is dependent on 5 main factors: sex, race, hormones, nutrition and physical activity,” he wrote. “Sex and race are nonmodifiable, while nutrition, physical activity and hormones are.

“While all the first 20 years of life are important in bone development, approximately 40% to 60% of adult bone mass is achieved during adolescence. Interestingly, 25% of peak bone mass is acquired during the two-year span around peak height velocity: 12.5 years of age for girls and 14 years of age for boys. Nearly all (90%) peak bone mass will have accrued by the age of 18 years, often determining our fracture risk for the rest of our lives.”

Dietary calcium is key for developing strong bones.

Wojtys advises teenagers get 1,300 mg per day for optimal growth. “Keeping in mind that an 8-ounce serving of milk provides 300 mg of calcium” Wojtys wrote, “it is clear that the calcium demand for optimal growth is not easily met. I don’t know of many teenagers who drink four glasses of milk per day. For those restricted to vegetable diets and who do not consume milk or other calcium-fortified plant milks, the challenge to obtain enough calcium becomes much more difficult.”

To optimize absorption of calcium, Vitamin D is necessary. Without Vitamin D, bones are able to absorb only 10-15% of available dietary calcium, according to Wojtys. This vital substance is found in milk, eggs, fish, breakfast cereal and multivitamins. Play outside in warm weather, in a T-shirt and shorts, and the sun and your skin will combine to make it for you.

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Early school sports reduce ADHD symptoms for girls in later years

Girls who played after-school sports in elementary school seem to have fewer symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder once they reach middle school, a new study suggests.

The research included both boys and girls, but the effect of sports on attention and behavior symptoms was only significant in girls.

“Girls, in particular, benefit from participation in sport when it comes to ADHD symptoms,” said lead author Linda Pagani. She’s a professor at the University of Montreal School of Psychoeducation in Quebec, Canada.

ADHD is a condition that includes ongoing patterns of inattention, hyperactivity and/or impulsivity — issues that interfere with a person’s functioning or development, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

ADHD signs and symptoms include: Making careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work or during other activities; having difficulty paying attention in tasks like a lecture or lengthy reading assignment or during play; seeming not to listen when spoken to directly; interrupting others; fidgeting; leaving one’s seat when staying seated is expected; running around in inappropriate situations or feeling restless, in teens and adults.

The current study included nearly 1,500 children born in Quebec in 1997 and 1998. The group included 758 girls and 733 boys with complete data from age 6.

Parents were asked if kids participated in an extra-curricular physical activity with a coach or instructor between the ages of 6 and 10.

When kids were 12, teachers were asked to compare their ADHD symptoms and behaviors to their peers’. Teachers only looked for symptoms suggestive of ADHD, not a formal diagnosis, Pagani said.

Girls who consistently participated in organized sports were less likely to have ADHD symptoms than girls who didn’t, the study found. The researchers didn’t find a similar link for boys.

Pagani said organized sports likely help reduce ADHD symptoms in several ways: During an organized physical activity, kids have to listen and focus on what their coach is saying. It’s different from an unstructured after-school program where kids can do whatever they want.

Sports also help inhibit distraction and promote planning behavior, Pagani explained. Plus, sports get kids away from their screens and switching from one app to the next, and give them a chance to shake off some energy.

So, why wouldn’t sports make a difference for boys, too?

They probably do, Pagani said, but the upside wasn’t strong enough to be statistically significant.

“Boys are over-identified when it comes to any kind of ADHD symptoms,” she said. “For every three boys with ADHD, only one girl will get identified. Girls may not be getting pharmacology [medications] and psychotherapy that boys often do. In this particular domain, because girls are under-identified and under-treated, they tend to benefit a lot from sports.”

All kids — both girls and boys — can benefit from taking part in organized sports, Pagani said.

Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y., reviewed the findings.

“Although the researchers found an association in girls between organized sports

How the Agent Behind Some of the Biggest Sports Stars Stays in Shape

From Men’s Health

Casey Wasserman keeps a three-year-old photo on his iPhone. In it, he’s standing next to NBA star Russell Westbrook.

Westbrook boasts the jacked arms and chiseled body. Wasserman? He’s 200 pounds of out-of-shape PR maven. “I saw that picture,” he says, remembering the moment, “and I’m like, ‘I’m done. I need to make a change.’”

The photo is Wasserman’s inspiration, and it’s driving him right now, as he takes off for a 20-yard sprint up his driveway hill on this sunny morning in Beverly Hills. It’s the final run in a 45-minute hill session. Yet Wasserman, 46, is just starting his workout.

Five days a week, he wakes before sunrise, then pushes through workouts with trainer Christine Khuri that may last three hours. “As difficult as it is sometimes to get started, I just know how much better [I’ll feel] and how much more energy and focus I’ll have when I’m done working out,” Wasserman says.

Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men’s Health

He needs that focus because he spends the workday pulling double duty, as chairman and CEO of Wasserman—a company that brokers endorsement deals for people like Westbrook and Giancarlo Stanton—and as chair of LA 2028, the committee tasked with prepping the city for the 34th Olympiad. That means overseeing deals that land NFL safety Malcolm Jenkins two clothing lines one moment and studying Olympic venue plans the next. And no, the Olympic prep isn’t all fun, especially when Wasserman gets a brief on rush-hour traffic flow.

Photo credit: Collin Erie
Photo credit: Collin Erie

Training clears his head. On this day, he goes from hill to home gym—a1,150-square-foot sweat zone that looks like a mini Equinox—and knocks out five sets of wide-grip pullups. TRX rows, dumbbell rows, and biceps curls follow, leaving him massaging his arms.

Until three years ago, Wasserman wasn’t training like this. He’d played tennis when he was young and had always been active. But he kept an intense travel schedule, frequently flying to Europe, Asia, and South America. “I used to wear this badge of honor that I traveled a lot and worked hard,” he says.

Then, just before the Westbrook wake-up call, his doctor told him he wasn’t in great shape. Wasserman knew he had to make some adjustments. He hasn’t missed a training session since and has dropped to 165 pounds, a weight he’s maintained for 18 months. “I don’t want to find out what happens when you take your foot off the gas,” he says.

Photo credit: Collin Erie
Photo credit: Collin Erie

Wasserman constantly finds new ways to drive his body. Some days he pushes the bounds of his breathing and flexibility with yoga. Or he does more hill sprints. Soon after social distancing was ordered in L.A., Wasserman mapped out and ran his own half-marathon course through Beverly Hills. Anything, he says, to prevent reverting to his pre-Westbrook days. “In anything, that anxiety and that fear means you care,” he says. “I care about my health.”

Workout of the Century

Photo credit: Collin Erie
Photo credit: Collin Erie

Matt Provencher | Fox Sports PressPass

Renowned orthopedist Dr. Matt Provencher and his company Proven Performance Technology (PPT) deliver data-driven injury insights to football fans. In this first-of-a-kind role as Athlete Injury and Performance Analyst for FOX Sports’ digital platforms, Provencher provides important predictive player health and recovery information about post-injury performance, the impact of weather, field conditions and more — serving hometown team loyalists, fantasy league owners and wagering interests.

Provencher first created the core algorithm for PPT’s proprietary insights while working as the Navy Special Forces (SEAL Teams) Head Orthopedic/Sports Surgeon and now leads a team of world-class data scientists and technologists with more than 50 years of collective professional sports league experience, at PPT.

Captain Matthew T. Provencher, MD MC US, a native of Barrington, New Hampshire, attended the United States Naval Academy, where he was appointed the Deputy Brigade Commander (Second in command), graduated with Distinction (Highest Honors) with a Major in Electrical Engineering, and was Secretary of the Navy Distinguished Graduate. He was also a 4-year varsity oarsman and First-Team All-American at Navy and named Most Valuable Oarsman. He completed his medical education at Dartmouth Medical School where he graduated with honors and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.

CAPT Provencher served as an Orthopaedic Surgeon at the Naval Medical Center San Diego from 2004 to 2013, and was The Director of the Sports Medicine and Surgery from 2007 to 2013. As the Head Orthopaedic Team Physician for the Navy Seal Teams 1, 3, 5 and 7, he was also instrumental in setting up the Special Forces Tactical Athlete Program (TAP) – a comprehensive wellness, injury prevention and rehabilitation program for Naval Special Forces.

In 2012, Dr. Provencher then took on the positions of Chief of Sports Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Visiting Professor of Harvard Medical School, and Medical Director and Head Team Physician for The New England Patriots football team. He was the Medical Director of the Patriots during the 2014 Super Bowl Championship season and pioneered a wellness and injury prevention program for the team. He also serves as a 2nd opinion orthopaedist for the NFL, MLB, and the NHL. In addition to these positions, he also acted as an assistant team physician for the Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins. Following his time at MGH, Dr. Provencher began his orthopaedic duties at The Steadman Clinic and Steadman Philippon Research Institute in March 2016.

Dr. Provencher was recently named one of the Top 28 Shoulder Surgeons in the United States and also one of the Top 28 Knee Surgeons in the United States by Orthopaedics Today. He is also recognized by Becker’s Orthopaedics as “One of 59 Great Orthopaedic Surgeons.” His research includes over 245 peer-reviewed publications and articles, 148 chapters, and has authored 6 textbooks. He has given over 500 peer-reviewed and invited national and international presentations in the realm of sports medicine and leadership. He continues his duties in the Navy as a Reservist and is assigned to Navy Seal

SPORTS MEDICINE: National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Month a time to look back | John Doherty

When the season did resume for the Blues, though, in a bubble in Edmonton in July, the team announced that Bouwmeester was not going to be with them.

It is unlikely he will ever be with the Blues — or any other NHL team — again. Yet, the former Olympic gold medalist (Sochi 2014) should still be thankful. The presence of medical professionals and their swift use of the AED made his chance of survival much greater.

A study published in 2018 in Sports Health identified 132 cases of SCA suffered among athletes age 11 to 27 between 2014 and 2016. Survival to discharge from a hospital was the result for 64, or 48% of the victims. However, if an AED was present and used promptly, the survival rate increased to 89%. Furthermore, whether an AED was available or not, if an athletic trainer was in attendance, the survival rate was 83%.

Had Bouwmeester been stricken at home or on a city street, his chance of survival would have been only 10%. Multiple studies have consistently demonstrated that rate nationwide.

A more recent study, since the onset of COVID-19, reported worse numbers. The decreased survivability was blamed on bystanders declining to do CPR, because of being fearful of catching the virus, and paramedics taking longer to arrive, due to having to don extra equipment to protect themselves from the virus.

If more members of the general public were trained and willing to do CPR, the success rate found in athletic arenas would be duplicated elsewhere.

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Nina Agdal gets heart rates soaring in a red sports bra as she leads fitness class

In quarantine, Danish supermodel Nina Agdal has made the transition from walking runways to leading workout classes. 

The 28-year-old stunner whose been spending her time in the Hamptons with boyfriend Jack Brinkley Cook, 25, was spotted arriving at her socially distanced workout class in Amagansett. 

The model was masked up at The Reform Club Inn, as she prepared to get heart rates soaring at her Agdal Method class. 

Agdal method: Supermodel Nina Agdal, 28, prepared to teach one of her workout classes out in The Hamptons on Saturday. The Danish born beauty wore a red sports bra and a pair of tight spandex as she taught a group in a socially distanced class

For her day of teaching, Nina showed off her statuesque physique in a red Nike sports bra that she paired with black spandex leggings. 

She toted along a green sweatshirt around her waist, tucking her cell phone in her leggings as she walked to the front of the class. 

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Preparing to get barefoot for the lesson, Nina sported a fun pair of tie dye socks and slides as she went makeup free. 

The Victoria’s Secret stunner kept her hair out of her face in a tight topknot, as she slid her sunglasses atop her head.

Toned and ready: The Danish born model walked to the front of her class with a mask on as she got ready to sweat it all out on Saturday
Sweat session: Nina led her intimate class of fitness enthusiasts outside as they switched between various strength training and toning exercises

 Making sure to protect herself and others, Nina kept her mask on very tight until she was up at the front in her designated space. 

In snaps shared to social media, followers of the method were seen standing on yoga mats with resistance bands and ankle weights as they engaged in a sculpt session. 

The fitness method which launched in app form in mid March, allows its consumers to get access to various workouts, in addition to nutrition guides and tips.  

Nina has grown a loyal following, engaging her clients in various core-strengthening workouts weekly, and holding in person classes since August. 

Workout: The fitness method which launched in app form in mid March, allows its consumers to get access to various workouts Nina does, in addition to nutrition guides and tips

Work and play: Nina rocked a unitard as she joked it was her ‘everyday uniform’ on social media, taking her from her workout classes to the streets

On Friday, Nina took to Instagram to do a Q+A with her 1.6M followers as she answered questions about fitness and her health journey. 

The model shared a lot about herself, revealing that even as a model she struggles with body image and weight. 

She wrote, ‘My weight has fluctuated like crazy the past 12 years. I started full time modeling at 18 and my weight was all over the place. I’ve been 120 pounds and I’ve

EyeGuide Adds Six Sports Medicine, Neuroscience Experts to Scientific Advisory Board

EyeGuide Inc., a health technology and bioinformatics company revolutionizing the way brain health is monitored, has announced the expansion of its scientific advisory board with the additions of Dr. Anne Naclerio, Dr. Dhiren Naidu, Dr. Jon Patricios, Dr. Kathryn Schneider, Dr. Karen Sutton and Dr. Michael Turner. Each of these leading scientific experts brings specialized skills, knowledge and experience to help the EyeGuide team build a world-class advisory board.

“EyeGuide is doing important work to improve ocular-motor assessment of athletes with suspected brain injuries, to advance brain health, and to improve the wellness and performance of athletes of all ages. This is an exciting step forward for EyeGuide as the company now gains further support from an array of respected senior experts across the field of sports medicine and neuroscience,” said Dr. Ruben Echemendia, Chairperson of EyeGuide Scientific Advisory Board, which was established earlier this year. “I am eager to work together with this impressive team of advisers as well as collaborate on providing insight and guidance to EyeGuide so its products may help improve the lives of many people across the U.S. and around the world.”

The new members of EyeGuide’s Scientific Advisory Board include:

  • Dr. Anne Naclerio has spent the past 10 years working as chief of clinical operations for the Regional Health Command Atlantic, deputy surgeon for the U.S. Army in Europe, the command surgeon for the Army National Guard, and the chief of medical readiness and policy for the U.S. Army Surgeon General. Dr. Naclerio served in the Army for over 30 years and has earned numerous decorations including the Bronze Star, Purple Heart and the Legion of Merit. She also established and led the Women’s Health Taskforce to enable the services to better understand and meet the unique needs of female service members.

  • Dr. Dhiren Naidu is a tenured associate professor in the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Alberta. He is also currently the head team physician for the National Hockey League’s Edmonton Oilers, the lead physician for the Canadian Football League’s Edmonton Eskimos, the head physician for the University of Alberta Golden Bears football team and a health physician for their varsity athletic program.

  • Dr. Jon Patricios is an associate professor in the Wits Faculty of Health Sciences and director of Wits Sport and Health (WiSH). He is also the current director of Waterfall Sports Orthopaedic Surgery in Johannesburg; founder and Director of Sports Concussion South Africa; sports concussion consultant to World Rugby; a board member of the international Concussion in Sports Group; and on the Scientific Committee for the International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport. He is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Faculty of Sports & Exercise Medicine (UK) and the International Sports Medicine Federation. Jon serves on the advisory board of the Sports Health and Safety Institute at the University of Washington, Seattle. Apart from sports concussion, he has an interest in the pediatric and aging athlete, joint disease, tendinopathy, and

Qatar- Aspetar book provides a unique insight into the world of sports medicine

(MENAFN – Gulf Times) Aspetar, the leading orthopaedic and sports medicine hospital, announced the launching of Aspetar Sports Medicine Collection, a special edition book created by the Aspetar Sports Medicine Journal, Aspetar.
This unique two-volume book brings around 200 articles which were written by more than 300 authors and carefully selected by the Editor-in-Chief, Prof Dr Nebojsa Popovic, and his co-editors. Volume 1 focuses on topics in sports science, medicine of sport, and exercise & lifestyle medicine, whilst Volume 2 addresses subjects relevant to injuries of the upper and lower extremity.
With more than 1,400 pages, Aspetar Sports Medicine Collection aims to help its readers, whether they are medical professionals, coaches or students, improve their understanding of sports medicine to make better-informed decisions in assisting the athletes.
Through its new publication, Aspetar aims to appeal to a wide range of readers interested in the sports and medical fields and to build awareness, locally, regionally and internationally around its world-class facilities, cutting-edge technologies and break-through research. This helps to realise its mission of becoming a global leader in the fields of sports medicine, orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation.
Commenting on the publication, Khalid Ali al-Mawlawi, Chief Administrative Officer of Aspetar said: ‘This collection contributes to the Aspetar’s efforts of spreading knowledge amongst healthcare practitioners, students, and athletes locally and Globally. Several topics have been raised in this issue by publishing more than 200 scientific articles through the participation of the most prominent scientists and researchers from various parts of the world, in addition to sharing the experiences that the hospital has with the medical community, which aligns with Aspetar’s vision to be a leader in sports medicine in the region and around the world.
As a part of Aspetar’s commitment to free knowledge sharing, the book will not be available for sale. Instead, 1,000 hard copy will be gifted to authors, relevant institutions and distinguished individuals in Qatar and around the world. It will also be distributed to renowned organisations worldwide, such as: International Olympic Committee (IOC) and FIFA, and other sports federations and clubs.
Prof Dr Nebojsa Popovic said, ‘This Collection would not have been possible without so many enthusiastic individuals sharing their expertise, time and passion in supporting the multidisciplinary, global education, that benefits Qatar and the rest of the world. For that reason we have a moral obligation to announce in the coming weeks, the way in which this collection will be accessible, free of charge, to all those protecting the health of the athletes. All together we have to be ready for the FIFA World Cup in Qatar 2022.
Aspetar journal present a multidisciplinary approach to athlete care with topics including sports science, sports medicine, sports surgery, sports rehabilitation and sports radiology, written by international experts in their field.
Launched in April 2012, the Aspetar Sports Medicine Journal is a scientific magazine published by Aspetar hospital, where athletes are provided with the highest possible medical treatment for sports-related injuries in a state-of-the-art facility, staffed by some of the

Detroit Medical Center drops plans for sports medicine institute near Little Caesars Arena

DETROIT (WXYZ) — The Detroit Medical Center has announced it “will not move forward with plans” to join a $70 million development near Little Caesars Arena in Detroit.

Olympia Development of Michigan and DMC announced the 20-year agreement to build and operate an innovative, state-of-the-art 50,000-square-foot sports medicine facility adjacent to Little Caesars Arena 2 back in June 2018.

The $70 million building would replace a former surface parking lot at Sproat Street and will bring four floors of Class A office space and 17,000 square feet of street-level retail to The District Detroit, according to officials.

Read the full statement below:

The last several months have brought about unprecedented change for the health care industry. Stay-at-home orders and restrictions prohibiting elective procedures caused hospitals everywhere to reevaluate their core services.

The Detroit Medical Center is committed to ensuring full preparedness for both the pandemic and the ongoing needs of our local community’s health care needs.

After careful consideration, we have made the decision to focus on our core mission and the DMC will not move forward with plans to lease space for a sports medicine institute. Our decision allows us to reallocate resources appropriately in this changing environment.

We appreciate the efforts of Olympia Development of Michigan and value our relationship with the organization. We have come to this decision in cooperation with them and we appreciate their support for the DMC’s core mission.

The DMC will continue to provide outstanding medical care and training for athletes in its existing facilities. Services are provided at Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan’s outpatient therapy sites across the region and the DMC Sports Performance clinic site in Pontiac in addition to the extensive array of orthopedic care options available through the DMC network.

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